Making Memory

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Credits

20

Module code

HU12003

  • Level 1
  • Semester 2
  • Humanities
  • Coursework 100%
  • Highly recommended for all new Humanities students.

Description

This module centres on Memory as a key concept in the Humanities. Recent thinking has focussed on the nature of personal, collective and cultural memory as shapers of individuals and society. Rather than a stable repository, Memory is understood to be unreliable, conflicted, contested, transitory, and political. Memory is connected with suppression, repression and censorship, as well as creation and imagination.

This module allows you to explore the selective remembering of the past in the present, and the importance of why and how certain elements are contested and forgotten. It encourages you to make connections between the archive, historical and philosophical approaches, representations in fiction, comics, art, music and creative writing. Working in a small group, you will have an opportunity to create your own Memory project on a topic of your choosing.

Teaching staff

The module is team-taught by academic staff in the School of Humanities.  The composition of the team is adjusted every year.

Teaching

There are 11 weeks of continuous teaching in semester 2.

2 one hour lectures a week and one 2 hour workshop.

22 hours of lectures and 22 hours of workshop.

Workshops can take place in archives, at V&A educational space, at McManus, etc. Towards the end the second hour of seminars will be used for group projects.

Assessment

 100% Coursework:

  • Essay (1,500 words) (40%)
  • Creative project (40%) & Reflective analysis (800 words) (20%)

Reading

Access the online reading list system

Intended learning outcomes

1.  Knowledge and understanding.

  • The module concerns different approaches to memory across diverse disciplines and media.

2.  Subject-specific practical and intellectual skills and attributes.

  • Analysis and interpretation of texts (including written and visual material).
  • Building evidence-based arguments.

3.  Transferable, employability and enterprise skills and attributes

  • Creative thinking.
  • Confidence in working with others.
  • Finding data and research material.
  • Digital literacies.