Dr Lizzie Bradford

Portrait photo of Lizzie Bradford
On this page

Contact

Email

ebradford001@dundee.ac.uk

Locations

Scrymgeour Building

Biography

Lizzie completed her BSc (Hons) in Psychology at the University of Kent.

She then gained an MSc in Evolutionary and Comparative Psychology at the University of St Andrews. Staying on at the University of St Andrews, Lizzie graduated in 2016 with her PhD in Cognitive Psychology from the School of Psychology and Neuroscience, working with Ines Jentzsch and Juan-Carlos Gomez.

After graduating from her PhD, Lizzie became a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at the University of Kent, working with Heather Ferguson as part of the ‘CogSoCoAGE’ Project (an ERC project examining the cognitive basis of social communication across the lifespan).

Lizzie joined the University of Dundee as a Lecturer in the Division of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, in January 2020.

Research

Lizzie's primary research interests are in Cognitive and Developmental Psychology. She is particularly interested in the field of social cognition, examining how social cognition abilities change and develop across the lifespan (ageing effects), the impact of deficits in social cognition amongst clinical populations (e.g., autism spectrum disorder), and how social cognition abilities may vary across different cultures. Lizzie’s research aims to further our understanding of how social cognition abilities (such as Theory of Mind, visual perspective taking, empathy) influence the quality of social interactions, the impact of difficulties with these abilities on day-to-day life for an individual, and factors that may underlie successful engagement of social cognition capacities (e.g., executive functions, such as working memory, inhibition, task switching, and planning).

For this research, Lizzie employs a variety of techniques, including eye-movements (e.g., lab-based and mobile eye-tracking), neuroscientific methods (e.g., EEG/ERPs), and behavioural measures.

View full research profile and publications