Research project

RSE COP 26 International Climate Change Network

This ‘RSE COP 26 International Climate Change Network’ project addresses how initial experience in tackling climate change in Scotland and the rest of the UK may yield insights into the design of domestic laws and regulations on adaptation and resilience in the Global South in line with international legal requirements under the Paris Agreement and the Paris Rulebook’

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Status

Active

Start date

June 2021

The 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference, also known as COP26, offers a unique opportunity to demonstrate the advantages of knowledge exchange through collaborative networking to an international audience in Scotland that includes representatives from the Global South. It allows identification of specific needs to be met by research-led long-term capacity building. CEPMLP has developed this Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE) project to specifically meet that challenge.

This ‘RSE COP 26 International Climate Change Network’ project addresses how initial experience in tackling climate change in Scotland and the rest of the UK may yield insights into the design of domestic laws and regulations on adaptation and resilience in the Global South in line with international legal requirements under the Paris Agreement and the Paris Rulebook. The networking aspect permits learning better what the problems are in the Global South, on adaptation and energy transitions (elements of a ‘good’ nationally determined contribution on adaptation), on the design, implementation and building community support for action. Greater international learning in Scotland would be a result of this.

The COP26 themes will be better understood with more granular detail through this exchange of ideas. In the longer term, close collaborative partnerships and stakeholder engagement can result.

Our collaboration with the Global South has depth by focusing initially on two states, Bangladesh and Uganda, that have a considerable influence in their respective regions. These states are influential and their laws on adaptation and energy transitions will set the standard for others.

The aim for impact is that all states benefit from taking one state in their group as an example, and this has already been discussed with the negotiators and legal advisers. A North-South and a South-South dialogue is emerging among researchers/stakeholders on effective climate governance frameworks (best practices/lessons learned) and how they can be facilitated.

Project type

Research project