Dr Nikola Krstajic

Lecturer

Biomedical Engineering, School of Science and Engineering

Portrait photo of Nikola Krstajic
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Contact

Email

n.krstajic@dundee.ac.uk

Phone

+44 (0)1382 385103

Location

Fulton Building

Biography

I graduated from the University of Salford in 1997 (MEng in Electronics). During my industrial work 1997-2003, I engaged in designing various aspects of STM microscopes (image acquisition), ECG monitoring devices (embedded software) and precision mechanics control (digital electronics and embedded software). I completed a PhD in Medical Physics in 2007 at the University of Surrey tackling optical analysis of 3D radiation dosimeters. Since 2007, I have delved into several exciting bio-imaging techniques including optical coherence tomography and fluorescence microscopy/endoscopy. In 2011 I joined a team of electronics engineers designing advanced single photon array detectors (CMOS Sensors group in Edinburgh led by Robert Henderson). While working on time resolved spectroscopy and imaging, I had the fortune of working closely with physicists developing advanced microscopes exploiting cutting edge applications in waveguides and light-in-flight. I joined University of Dundee as Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering in January 2018, based in the School of Science and Engineering.

Research

My research focus is on time-resolved spectroscopy & imaging and endomicroscopy. I also have broad interests across biomedical engineering, photonics, but also fundamental physics and biology. I designed a variety of imaging instruments including fluorescence microscopes, optical coherence tomography instruments and endoscopy tools. I enjoy tackling challenging clinical and biology problems with novel components and techniques. This requires broad expertise and I have been working closely with clinicians, biologists and chemists as well engineers and physicists. One of my key goals now is to provide affordable tools for endomicroscopy allowing in vivo cell biology of disease processes in humans clinically. This stems from my recent work in the Medical School at the University of Edinburgh where I designed a multi-colour endomicroscope for multiparameter imagingĀ in vivo in situ.

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Stories

Surgery image

Press Release

University of Dundee researchers have received funding that could help re-define the way blood flow is monitored during keyhole surgery.

Published on 13 January 2020