Feminist Philosophies and Queer Theories

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Credits

30

Module code

PI31023

  • Level 3
  • Semester 2
  • 24 places
  • Philosophy - School of Humanities
  • Coursework 100%

Description

This module is for anyone who is interested in how feminist and queer thinkers have affected the concepts, arts and material practices of philosophy. Who gets to count as a philosopher? Why are the settings, mannerisms and styles of philosophy important, alongside its arguments and theories? What are queer theories? How do differences of sex, gender and species come to matter? What new kind of critique, imagination and collectivity have feminist and queer thinkers helped open up? Students will discuss theories of affect, embodiment, sexual difference, performativity, situated knowledge, distributed agencies, drawing on thinkers, writers and artists, who transform philosophy and its edges.More broadly, they will explore how feminist and queer philosophies traverses different ontological, ethical, epistemological and aesthetic terrains, in order to respond to a range of personal, social and environmental problems.They will engage with thinkers and writers such as: Hipparchia, Diotima, Princess Elizabeth of Bohemia, Simone de Beauvoir, Michel Foucault, Audre Lorde, Michelle Le Dœuff, Genevieve Lloyd, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva, Judith Butler, Isabelle Stengers, Donna Haraway, Elizabeth A. Wilson, Elizabeth Grosz, Karen Barad, Octavia Butler and Ursula Le Guin.

Convenor

Dr Undine Sellbach

Assessment

The assessed components on this module are:

  • Workbook (weighting 15%)
  • Group presentations (approximately 5-10 min) (weighting 15%)
  • Written reflection on presentation (750 words) (weighting 15%)
  • Essay (2,500 words) (weighting 55%)

Reading

Access the online reading list system

Module Aims

  • To provide a substantial philosophical understanding of some key issues in feminist philosophy and queer theory.
  • To develop students’ ability to experiment with the style, setting and performance of philosophy, and reflect on the ethical and political implications of this.
  • To acquaint students with some leading concepts and arguments in feminist philosophy.
  • To develop the students’ capacity to engage critically with texts, particularly in the genre(s) of feminist philosophy and queer theory.
  • To help students develop their own interpretations and responses to such texts.
  • To develop students’ understanding of the conceptual, methodological and imaginative implications of feminist philosophy and queer theory.
  • To help students develop a vocabulary to reflect on personal, social or environmental problematics which cross different ontological, ethical, political, epistemological and aesthetic terrains.

Intended learning outcomes

  • Students will have achieved a critical understanding of the philosophical complexities and questions involved at the nexus of feminism, queer theory and philosophy.
  • Students will have gained an understanding of the conceptual, methodological and imaginative contributions of feminist philosophy and queer theory.
  • Students will have explored different ways of writing, performing and practicing philosophy, and can reflect on some of the ethical and political implications of this.
  • Drawing on concepts and methods from feminist philosophy, and queer theory, students will have developed a vocabulary to reflect on personal, social and/or environmental problematics which cross different ontological, ethical, political, epistemological and aesthetic terrains.
  • Students will have formed their own views concerning some key problems in contemporary feminist philosophy and queer theory.
  • Students will have developed their skills in interpreting challenging philosophical texts.
  • Students will have developed their skills in forming arguments around complex problems.
  • Students will develop the ability to reflect on their own responses to philosophical texts and creative works, and/or to explore how creative practice can help open up new philosophical questions.
  • Students will deepen their research skills and their capacity for independent thought.
  • Students will enhance their competence in written and spoken communication