• For Entry: September
  • Duration: 4 years
  • Award: BEng (Hons)
  • Study Abroad: Yes
  • Study Mode: Full Time

With great career prospects, a degree in Biomedical Engineering will help you use engineering principles to solve medical and biological problems.

TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework

At Dundee we have had an active research programme in biomedical engineering for over twenty years. This means that our staff are at the forefront of groundbreaking research.

This course offers taught core components and intensive research training. You will learn to solve a variety of engineering challenges in the medical field. You will also learn about the operating environments where these technologies are expected to function.

 

This course is delivered in collaboration with Ninewells Hospital, one of the largest teaching hospitals in Europe.

What's so good about this course at Dundee?

At Dundee, we have a strong link between hospital, industry and translational medical research, so you will gain valuable real-life hospital experience.  We also offer a combination of both clinical and surgical aspects of medical imaging.   

You will gain skills for a career in the medical industry, clinical environments or professional biomedical research.

 

Gain strong practical skills to enter a range of medical-related industries

YouTube Poster Image (Cached)

The following are the minimum, up-to-date entry requirements.

Courses starting 2018 and 2019
Qualification Level 1 Entry Advanced Entry to Level 2
SQA Higher/Advanced Higher BBBB (minimum) - AABB (typical) at Higher including mathematics and a science or engineering subject (physics is preferred) AB at Advanced Higher including mathematics and a science or engineering subject (physics is preferred), plus AB at Higher in different subjects
GCE A-Level BCC (minimum) - BBB (typical) including A-Level mathematics and a science or engineering subject (physics is preferred) BBB (minimum) - AAB (typical) including A-Level mathematics and a science or engineering subject (physics is preferred)
BTEC A relevant BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma with DDM A relevant BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma with DDD.
International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma 30 points at Higher Level grades 5, 5, 5 to include mathematics and a science or engineering subject (physics is preferred).
A combination of IB Certificate plus other qualifications, such as A-Levels, Advanced Placement Tests or the International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme (IBCP), will also be considered.
34 points at Higher Level grades 6, 6, 5 to include mathematics and a science or engineering subject (physics is preferred)
Irish Leaving Certificate (ILC) H2H2H3H3 at Higher Level including mathematics and a science or engineering subject (physics is preferred) Level 2 entry is not possible with this qualification
Graduate Entry
SQA Higher National (HNC/HND) A relevant HNC with B in the Graded Unit including Mathematics for Engineering 1 A relevant HNC with A in the Graded Unit including Mathematics for Engineering 2 and 120 SCQF points.
A relevant HND with BB in the Graded Units including Mathematics for Engineering 2
Scottish Baccalaureate Pass with BC at Advanced Higher in Mathematics and a Science/Engineering subject Distinction with AB at Advanced Higher in Mathematics and a Science/Engineering subject
SWAP Access Relevant science subjects with ABB grades including Mathematics and Physics Units at SCQF Level 6 Level 2 entry is not possible with this qualification
Advanced Diploma Grade B with ASL-A Levels at AB in Mathematics and a Science/Engineering subject Grade B with ASL-A Level at AA in Mathematics and a Science/Engineering subject
Welsh Baccalaureate Pass with A level at AB in Mathematics and a Science/Engineering subject Pass with A level at AA in Mathematics and a Science/Engineering subject
European Baccalaureate 70% overall with 7 in Mathematics and a Science/Engineering subject 75% overall with 7.5 in Mathematics and a Science/Engineering subject
Other Qualifications
Notes

 EU and International qualifications



English Language Requirement

For non EU students

IELTS Overall 6.0
Listening 5.5
Reading 5.5
Writing 6.0
Speaking 5.5

 Equivalent grades from other test providers

 

English Language Programmes

We offer Pre-Sessional and Foundation Programme(s) throughout the year. These are designed to prepare you for university study in the UK when you have not yet met the language requirements for direct entry onto a degree programme.

 Discover our English Language Programmes

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF)

The University of Dundee has been given a Gold award – the highest possible rating – in the 2017 Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF).

Read more about the Teaching Excellence Framework

How you will be assessed

Assessment varies in detail from module to module.


Methods of assessment include a combination of:

  • coursework
  • group project reports
  • laboratory reports
  • written examinations

You will present a major final year project and dissertation at the end of year 4.

How you will be taught

This course is taught by academics from the School of Science & Engineering and the School of Medicine, as well as medical physicists, hospital consultants and medical industry experts.

Teaching methods include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • tutorials
  • laboratory experiments
  • design assignments
  • industrial visits
  • professional training
  • a variety of projects

In your final year, time is allocated for research project work.

What you'll study

Your first two years are designed to ensure that you achieve sound knowledge in mathematics, physics and engineering. Practical skills in the first two years are gained through workshops and projects.

Your third year builds upon the first two years of compulsory courses in science and engineering subjects.  You will follow a pathway to specialisation in medical engineering through design, optics, instrumentation, business framework and medical sciences to develop approaches to problem solving.

In your final year, you will develop a coherent, systematic, detailed knowledge of the disciplines in biomedical engineering as professional skills.  Research skills and ethics will be introduced. Knowledge and understanding is acquired throughout the study and will translate into biomedical engineering themed individual projects.

Modules for September 2019

Level 1 modules

About the module

Engineering relies on solid mathematical basis and we will provide students with the necessary prerequisite mathematical skills and knowledge to handle engineering degree courses. The aim is to increase student’s confidence in using and understanding mathematics.

Core contents includes:

  1. algebra, functions and graphs, inverse functions, equations and inequalities
  2. trigonometry, trigonometric formulae and equations
  3. vectors in two and three dimensions
  4. differentiation, chain rule, critical points, curve sketching
  5. integration, antiderivatives, definite integrals and area

The aims of the module are to give students the ability to appreciate the processes involved in engineering and scientific projects, while working in small multi-disciplinary teams under minimum supervision. They will develop essential communication skills in engineering drawing and sketching, essential computer skills, basic project management and reporting skills and an appreciation of Health and Safety concepts and risk assessment.

This module is preparatory for the Engineering Project II module in Semester II, where students will also work in groups.

Core contents includes:

  1.  introduction to civil, mechanical, electrical engineering and renewable energy;
  2.  IT skills encompassing word processing, spreadsheets, presentation software and introduction to CAD software;
  3.  communication of engineering data between disciplines and effective teamworking;
  4.  reading, researching, collating information;
  5.  project planning and time management;
  6.  oral presentation;
  7.  conceptual design work for Semester 2 material;
  8.  risk assessment (of project work)

Much of modern life is underpinned by a reliance on electricity. In this module students will explore the fundamental concepts that enable us to understand how electric circuits operate and the intimate connection between electrical and magnetic phenomena. Students will develop an understanding of these concepts and the appropriate mathematical and problem solving tools to allow analysis of electrostatic, circuit and electromagnetic induction problems. This course will give students the foundation for study at higher levels in physics and engineering subjects, but will also be of interest to those studying a broader range of courses with an appropriate maths and physics background.

Core contents includes:

  1. properties of electric charge, conductors and insulators, Coulomb’s Law of electrostatic attraction
  2. electric fields, electric dipoles, electric forces
  3. electric potential and potential energy, equipotentials, potential gradients
  4. circuit properties, direct current, capacitance, dielectrics, resistivity, resistance, electromagnetic force, Kirchoff’s Laws, resistive capacitive circuits
  5. magnetic fields, magnetic flux

We will introduce students to the fundamentals of engineering mechanics (statics) that will underpin future studies in engineering science and physics. We will apply these principles to engineering situations. To cultivate the skills of problem solving and efficient time management.

Core contents includes:

  1. base and derived SI units
  2. scalar and vector quantities, vector mathematics
  3. action and reaction forces – free body diagrams
  4. relationship between mass and force
  5. static equilibrium
  6. types of friction
  7. potential energy, conservative and non-conservative forces
  8. elasticity and the behaviour of springs and solids
  9. solution of problems relating to the above topics
  10. development of problem solving skills
  11. laboratory work associated with the above topics

We will provide students with the necessary pre-requisite mathematical skills and knowledge to handle engineering degree courses. The aims are also to increase student’s confidence in using and understanding mathematics while building on and advance the skills acquired in EG11003.

Core contents includes: 

  1. logarithms and exponentials
  2. further differentiation
  3. further integration
  4. further trigonometry
  5. further algebra
  6. partial fractions
  7. sequences and series
  8. plane geometry
  9. the geometry of straight lines and planes in three dimensions

 

Students will develop the ability to appreciate the processes involved in engineering and scientific projects, while working in small teams under minimum supervision.

The following skills will be developed:

  1. practical project management skills
  2. abilities in problem solving and modelling using simple materials
  3. an appreciation of health and safety concepts in action

You will use miniature robots to sense and manipulate the environment. We usually organise problem solving industrial visits as well. Students will work in small cohort groups on resolving a small engineering problem. 

Thermodynamics is the study of energy transformations involving heat, mechanical work and other aspects of energy.  It forms an indispensable part of the foundation of engineering, physics, chemistry and the life sciences. This module will introduce students to the concepts of thermodynamics necessary to underpin their future studies in engineering.

Core contents includes:

  1. physical quantities, units and temperature scales
  2. heat transfer, thermal equilibrium, thermal expansion
  3. molecular models of solids, liquids and gases
  4. volume, temperature and pressure changes, the Ideal Gas Laws, heat capacities
  5. heat transfer and work done, paths between thermodynamic states
  6. molar heat capacities, internal energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics
  7. adiabatic, isochoric, isobaric and isothermal processes
  8. reversible and irreversible processes, refrigerators, heat engines and internal combustion engines
  9. the Second Law of Thermodynamics, the Carnot cycle and concept of entropy

This module is designed to cover core areas of classical physics including equilibrium and elasticity, and mechanical waves. The module is designed for both engineering and physics students.

Core contents includes:

  1. equilibrium and elasticity
  2. fluid mechanics
  3. simple harmonic motion and simple pendulum
  4. mechanical waves, standing and travelling waves
  5. energy in wave motion
  6. interference and superposition of waves and phase
  7. waves on a string and wave modes
  8. sound waves
  9. resonance and sound, beats
  10. Doppler Effect

Level 2 modules

The  aim  of  this  module  is  to  provide  broad  experience  of  modern engineering software as applied to both the design process and as an embedded feature in products and systems.

This module focuses on the use of major engineering software tools for use in engineering applications and across enterprises. The intention is to provide both insight into the operation of modern engineering software and comprehensive hands-on experience of the use of this engineering software as preparation for engineering in industry.

The module introduces method of presenting and visualising ideas to an engineering audience through the use of 3-D design suites (e.g. SolidWorks) for the production of basic engineering drawings and 3-D solid models.

The Embedded Controllers portion will provide an introduction to the design of microcontroller systems with hardware and software, allowing students to gain the knowledge to develop simple embedded systems for their own designs.

This module will introduce students to the basic principles and applications of medical instrumentation. This includes the nature of physiological signals and how they can be acquired, analysed and visualised. The aim of the module is to provide the students with a grounding knowledge base which allows them to understand the state of the art technology and standard principles applied in medical instrumentation. The basic physiology of physiological signals, governing physics and mathematics will be introduced along with their application in a clinical setup. Students will furthermore develop prototypes of medical instruments in an accompanying laboratory session.

Core contents includes:

  1. Fundamentals of medical instrumentation: medical instrumentation systems; requirements on medical instruments; design criteria
  2. Introduction to sensors and signal processing: transducers, sensors and instruments; calibration; accuracy and error; amplifiers; filters; software and hardware signal processing
  3. Nature of biomedical signals: physical signals (force, torque, flow, pressure as well as thermal, geometric and kinematic quantities); biopotentials; chemical signals
  4. Transducers of biomedical signals and their application: biopotential electrodes and amplifiers; pressure sensors; flow sensors; optical sensors;  electrochemical sensors
  5. Therapeutic devices: pacemakers and defibrillators; ventilators
  6. Regulations and safety measures

This module gives students a firm grounding in the principles of biomechanics and biomaterials. The module aims to equip students to undertake analysis of mechanical structures. Here the fundamental principles of mechanics will be applied to the human body as a load bearing structure. Furthermore the students will be introduced to biomaterials, in particular their properties and behaviour.

Core contents includes:

  1. Fundamental principles in solid mechanics: force diagrams, section properties, bending and deflection, torsion and shear force actions in beams; relationship between stress and strain; relationship between load and structural response; failure criteria.
  2. Introduction to biomechanics of human tissue: bone and soft tissue; load-deformation, stress-strain; elasticity, viscosity, viscoelasticity; anisotropy.
  3. Introduction to biomaterials: natural and synthetic materials; mechanical properties of biomaterials; tissue mimicking.

The aim of this module is to explore the basic structure, organisation and function of the human body.
Core contents includes:

  1. basic body forms and systems
  2. structure and organisation of the body systems including: respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, urogenital, nervous and musculoskeletal systems
  3. histology of epithelium, connective tissues, muscle and neural tissues
  4. basic biomechanics, nerve conduction and the neuromuscular junction

The module continues the development of the basic mathematics most relevant to engineers and covers material required for accreditation of degree programmes in engineering.

Core contents includes:

  1. Vectors: revision of basic properties, scalar and vector products; applications to polygon of forces, centres of mass, work, moments and three-dimensional geometry of lines and planes.
  2. Algebra: sequences and series, summation of finite series, including the binomial series; limits of sequences, infinite series.
  3. Statistics: data displays and summaries, including histograms, dot plots, scatter plots; mean and standard deviation (including variance); median, quartiles and the range; box and whisker plots. Probability including events, P(A) notation, addition and multiplication rules; the normal distribution. Statistical inference including populations and samples, sampling distributions; standard errors; confidence interval for the mean and for the difference between two means; t- tests as an alternative but less informative analysis than confidence intervals; linear regression analysis.
  4. Complex numbers: definition, arithmetic, modulus-argument form; Argand diagram; De Moivre's theorem; roots of polynomial equations; properties of ez
  5. Differential Equations: review of rules of differentiation; revision of elementary integration to include applications to the solution of first order separable ordinary differential equations; solution of first and second order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients (including general solutions and solutions satisfying initial conditions and boundary conditions).
  6. Functions of One Variable: functions of a single variable, definition and notation; standard functions and their inverses (including hyperbolic and inverse hyperbolic functions).
  7. Limits, including limits involving infinity; asymptotes; continuous and discontinuous functions; curve sketching involving rational functions (illustrating maxima, minima and points of inflection) and conic sections (including translation of axes); normals, curvature; descriptive treatment of Rolle's theorem, mean-value theorem; Taylor polynomials and Taylor's theorem; L'Hopital's rules.
  8. Integration; further examples of the standard methods of integration, applications of integration to arc length, areas, volumes and surfaces of revolution, centres of mass, moments of inertia (first and second moments of area).

The goal of this module is to introduce students to key concepts in electricity and magnetism that underpin honours level studies in topics that range from photonics to solid state systems. It will also develop students understanding of electromagnetic waves and the propagation of light.

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Name and describe a range of electrostatic and magnetic phenomena making use of calculus and vector mathematics
  • Describe the concepts of electromagnetic induction, inductance and electromagnetic energy
  • Analyse alternating current circuits making use of inductors, capacitors and resistors
  • Apply the concept of waves to electromagnetic systems to develop Maxwell’s description of electromagnetism.
  • Apply the concept of an electromagnetic wave to the understanding of light and its interactions

This module provides an introduction to analogue and digital electronics and software for application in measurement and control systems. It also serves as prerequisite in subsequent modules in electronics, and project work. It is offered to Physics, Electronic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering students.

Core contents includes: the ideal op-amp and applications, combinational and basic sequential logic, sensors and actuators, block diagrams and equivalent circuits, non-idealities, frequency and transient response, noise and linearity, signal sampling and A to D conversion, D to A conversion and reconstruction, data transmission and interfaces, programmable instruments, LabView programming for measurement and control, test protocols and troubleshooting. 

This module gives students a firm grounding in the principles of machines and to equip them to undertake analysis and design of machines.

Core contents includes: electric motors, hydraulic and pneumatic systems, logic and programmable control, dynamic analysis, design for reliability. 

Level 3 modules

The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the computational and mathematical methods used in biomedical signal and image processing. The course gives the students a fundamental education in the theory, skills and understanding of many of the classical methods used to enhance and extract useful information from medical signals and images. This will provide students with an opportunity to practice working in a team and communication with other students. Several advanced methods for image and signal processing will also be covered to broaden students’ knowledge.

Core contents includes: Fourier transform, Fourier spectra analysis, convolution, digital filter design, wavelet transform and filter, EMD filter, image histograms, image thresholding, segmentation, morphological image processing, image filtering as well as the modern theory and applications of image filtering and 3D reconstruction.

A variety of clinical data, i.e. clinical EEG/ECG signal and radiological diagnostic scenarios and applications are also included in this course as examples in laboratory sessions to motivate the methods. Students interested in medical signal and image processing, as well as health and medicine, will find this course useful.

This module introduces students to techniques and instrumentation used in medical imaging and surgical procedures. Students will be provided with an understanding of the fundamental methods of surgery, surgical planning, training and diagnostics as well as medical imaging. The aim of the module is to generate a grounding knowledge base for the students which allows them understanding the technology and principles applied in a surgical environment. The governing physics and mathematics will be introduced along with their application in a clinical setup. During practical sessions the students will be presented with applications of the taught content.

Core contents includes:

  1. Introduction to medical imaging: X-ray: Radiography and X-ray computed tomography, X-ray equipment, windowing, adverse effects; magnetic resonance imaging: spin and resonance, image reconstruction, MRI equipment; ultrasound: basic principles of US imaging, technology; hybrid imaging
  2. Introduction to surgical techniques: laparoscopic surgery: instruments and procedure; endoscopy: instruments, procedure, imaging; robotic surgery; cardiovascular surgery: stents, occluder, catheters, equipment, procedures; surgical training and medical phantoms
  3. Image guided surgery: registration and navigation of surgical tools; visualisation of tool paths; surgery planning

This module is an introduction to the skills required in research and development in engineering. Students will be introduced to the processes in R&D projects as well as methods for the successful conception and completion of a project. This will also include the processes for the commercialisation of a product.

Furthermore students will learn how to present research outputs and they will be introduced to potential issues related to intellectual property and ethics in R&D. Students will apply their knowledge in coursework assignments and during practical sessions.

The course aims to introduce students to design strategies of biomedical devices. Furthermore the module aims to provide students with the opportunity to further their problem solving skills and gain experience which is essential for their later employment. As part of this the students will visit industrial partners who provide them with projects based around current engineering problems. The students will also work on a design project related to biomedical devices which allows them to further their skills and apply their knowledge in a practical project.

Core contents includes:

  1. design of products and components;
  2. statistical approaches (factor of safety and reliability, testing and design);
  3. plastics product design;
  4. material selection in product innovation;
  5. engineering design case studies;
  6. industrial problem solving ability;
  7. use of 3D CAD/CAM systems;
  8. project work:
    1. design project based on relevant topics in Biomedical Engineering
    2. problem solving project in collaboration with links to research, development and industry.

This module introduces students to techniques and instrumentation in surgical environments. Students will be provided with knowledge and understanding of surgical and medical instrumentation as well as workflow and ergonomics in operating theatres. The aim of this module is to generate a knowledge base for the students which allows them to understand the technology and methods applied in the surgical environment of a hospital.

Content includes:

  1. surgical technology, energy application and surgical training
  2. medical instrumentation, sterilisation and auxiliary equipment
  3. operating theatres: lighting, airflow, ergonomics, workflow

The module continues the development of the mathematics most relevant to engineers and covers material required for accreditation of degree programmes in engineering.

Core contents includes:

  1. Matrices and linear systems (11 lectures): linear transformations and matrices; matrix algebra; transpose; symmetric and skew-symmetric matrices; linear equations; reduction to row echelon form; Gaussian elimination, partial pivoting; linear dependence, rank of a matrix; inverse of a non-singular matrix, determinants (brief treatment); eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
  2. Calculus of two or more variables (12 lectures): partial derivatives, mention of partial differential equations; chain rule; Taylor’s Theorem, maxima and minima; transformations; Jacobians, reciprocal theorem; iterated integrals, double integrals, change of order, change of variables.
  3. Numerical methods (4 lectures): interpolation polynomials, Newton’s formula; numerical integration; trapezium rule and Simpson’s rule;  solution of a single nonlinear equation, Newton’s method.
  4. Fourier series and transforms (6 lectures): periodic functions, orthogonality relations for trigonometric functions; Fourier series: definitions and examples for general, odd and even functions; Fourier transforms and inverse transforms: definition, linearity and shift properties, examples.

The principal aims are twofold: first to give students a working knowledge of the way lumped parameter systems vibrate and how to calculate important quantities of that vibration such as natural frequency and nodal positions; second to introduce automatic control systems so that they can design controllers for a variety of simple systems.

Core contents includes: vibration of two-degree-of-freedom systems, vibration absorption, transverse vibration of beams, three term controllers, steady state errors, frequency response, introduction to Laplace Transform, the concept of stability, Routh-Hurwitz criterion, gain and phase margins, the Nyquist criterion, block diagram manipulation, Root Locus method (introduction only), practical control elements - actuators, sensors, simulation via MATLAB.

The aim of the module is to develop students’ understanding of the purpose, concepts and the key processes of managing a business, and their career as an engineer.

On completing the module students will: understand the key functions of business including finance, marketing, organisation, and law; be able to prepare a business plan for a new business; be able to develop a professional business profile that would be appropriate for a graduate engineer.

Core contents includes: enterprise and entrepreneurship, market analysis and planning, markets and promoting ideas, legal issues in business, what is a contract, what is an engineer, and professional issues, aptitude testing and recruitment, the application process and commercial awareness.

Level 4 modules

This module is an introduction to biomedical optics (or biophotonics). Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of optics, electronics, human and cell biology as the basic background needed to understand the subject.

This will proceed to further discussion of light sources, detectors and photonics systems involved. Historical overview of the optical microscope will be given to reveal the evolution of one of the most fundamental tools in biology. The module will then proceed to discussing tools and components in more advanced microscopies as well as recent advances in tissue imaging such as optical coherence tomography. Diverse nature of biophotonics will be illustrated by contrasting advanced instrumentation in life science laboratories (e.g. selective plane illumination microscopy and super-resolution microscopy) to biomedical tools found in clinics and industry (endoscopes, point-of-care instruments, biotechnology tools).

Furthermore students will learn how to link optical and photonic system architecture to image and data acquisition and basic image and signal processing. Software skills will be encouraged to explore light-tissue interactions via Monte Carlo simulations (e.g. in Matlab). Students will apply their knowledge in coursework assignments and during practical sessions.

The principal aim of this module is to give the students a good working knowledge of the tools and techniques for advanced control system analysis and design.  

This encompasses linear and nonlinear systems.  Linear continuous analysis and design methods include Bode and Nyquist techniques including compensation, root locus and pole placement.  With a substantial proportion of industrial control being computer based, the module also aims to introduce students to sampled data systems, digital control system theory and its implementation. The whole is backed up by the use of MATLAB/SIMULINK and its toolboxes for analysis, design and simulation.

This module provides an introduction to the use of the computer as a tool for  solving  general  engineering  problems,  particularly  in  the  areas  of aerodynamic  simulation,  structural  analysis  and  the  design  of  dynamic systems. Students will learn and apply the basic computational/numerical methods that are necessary to solve real engineering problems. The software packages used (ANSYS, SolidWorks and COSMOS Express) are all industry standards, so the student will be well prepared for computer aided engineering in modern engineering industries. The module is divided into three parts namely finite element methods, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and 3-D solid model mechanism design and analysis.

Topics include:

  1. Finite element methods: matrix methods applied to frames, displacement distribution and shape functions, 2-d elements, equation solving – optimisation, creating an FE model – care in selecting elements & application of boundary conditions, use of symmetry, mesh creation, model & result verification, experience of commercial package – ANSYS.
  2. Computational fluid dynamics: equations of motion, equation types, solution methods, potential flow, grid optimisation, experience of commercial package – ANSYS, associated course work (computer exercises).
  3. 3-D Solid Model Mechanism Design and Analysis: creation of simple mechanisms, animation of simple mechanisms, creation of frames of reference, allocation of material properties to models, analysis of simple mechanisms, verification of motion results.

This course is intended to give students an appreciation of the theory and application of mechatronics and robotics in real engineering situations. The aim of the course is to show that modern machines and products depend on the integration of many facets of engineering science and technology in the realisation of successful working systems. Examples of the principles of modern sensors, actuators and interfaces, including case study material will be used to demonstrate the interdependency of specialisms in a range of mechatronic and robot applications and mechatronic products.

Robot Motion: Robot design and applications. Analysis and control of robot motion. Joint, world and tool coordinate frames. Transformation between coordinate frames. Forward and inverse kinematics. Denavit-Hartenberg homogeneous transformations.

Robot Programming and Interfacing: Levels of sophistication of robot programming. On and offline programming. Text based systems, graphical systems, algorithmic programming. Programming in the VAL robotics language, with practical demonstrations.

Mechatronics:  The evolution of mechatronics. Computers and microcontrollers. Intelligence in mechatronic systems. Applications of mechatronics in industry and medicine.

Vision and Imaging: Image processing and analysis:  image data reduction, segmentation, feature extraction, object recognition. Camera location and perspective transformation. Integration of vision systems with mechatronic and robotic systems.

Sensors and Actuators: Force and tactile sensors, microfabricated sensors; piezoelectric, shape memory alloy and other smart actuators, robotic and mechatronic systems applications in industry and medicine.

The module aims to develop a critical appreciation of the research process in biomedical engineering and imaging technology, expose students to highly focused areas of leading edge research in biomedical engineering, imaging and biotechnology and offer students a detailed understanding of some of the biomedical research topics in University of Dundee, whilst developing generic skills connected with approaches to research and advanced development.

Topics addressed also include professional development opportunities, and career development skills; including creating a plan of study, informational and job interviewing, writing a resume, technical writing, preparing effective oral presentations, and peer-editing.

Credit rating: SHE H (SCQF 10), 60 SCQF credits

Aims of module

  • An opportunity to develop skills in research, investigative methods and design in an area of biomedical engineering that interests you.
  • A high level of competence in a particular biomedical engineering topic.
  • Confidence in the conduct of a project which requires individual responsibility and initiative.
  • Steering and encouragement to work independently on a project.

Improved skills in project planning and implementation, team working and communication with peers and experts.

The module comprises:

  • A project which will be selected by the student in conjunction and negotiation with the project supervisor.
  • Preparation and presentation of an interim report, summarising the main aims of the project work, research strategy and literature review related to the project.
  • A thesis. 

The process requires you to:

  • Define and negotiate a project topic; projects will generally be part of a larger group research activity and will require you to work as a team member within the group.
  • Identify appropriate techniques, project structure and timetable.
  • Undertake an investigation of the published literature. Produce an interim report summarising and reviewing the literature on the project topic. The report should conform to the conventions of academic writing. An oral presentation will form part of the interim report.
  • Undertake a period of research or development work, or a combination of both, according to the project type.
  • Attend regular progress meetings with the project supervisor.
  • Present a critical analysis of the results or findings, draw conclusions and make recommendations for further work.
  • Describe the project in its entirety in a written dissertation that complies with academic publishing conventions.
  • Prepare and deliver a presentation, expand upon any aspect of the project and propose future work in an oral examination.

Intended learning outcomes

Upon successful completion of the module, the students should be able to:

  • Establish a testable hypothesis or project aim (objective) within a biomedical engineering context.
  • Demonstrate competence in project management including planning, scheduling and resource identification.
  • Display mastery of a complex and specialised area of knowledge and skill, including the ability to undertake a critical review of the published literature.
  • Demonstrate competence in conducting a research project, including designing and executing a significant piece of independent research work to test a hypothesis or achieve a project aim.
  • Analyse, evaluate and appraise experiment results.
  • Demonstrate competence and skills in writing within accepted academic norms.
  • Demonstrate competence and skills in delivering a presentation to a professional standard; to demonstrate confidence in oral defence of original work.
  • Demonstrate skills in self-management, independent learning, critical thinking, problem-solving and communication.

Assessment strategy and types

The intended learning outcomes of the module will be assessed by coursework (1 oral examination, 1 poster presentation; 20%) and thesis examination (80%).

Assessment type

Weighting (%)

Coursework

20%

Thesis examination

80%

Practical exams

0%

Teaching and Learning

You are expected to be self-motivated in conducting their honours project, enhancing their technical competence and building self-sufficiency.

Supervisors will provide support and guidance.

There will be a total of 600 module hours.

Learning activity

Indicative number of hours (and percentage of total learning time)

Scheduled contact time: Lectures, tutorials & demonstration.

100

Approximate breakdown of scheduled contact time

Face to face guidance

60

Tutorials & Demonstration

40

Time in guided independent study including the completion of assessment tasks

500

Time on placement relevant to the module

 

Mode of study

Mode of study

Supervised research project

Mode of attendance

Regular meetings with project supervisor

Location of attendance for face-to-face teaching

N/A

This module aims to provide the student with a broad overview of medical ultrasound systems. It will aid students to develop the required skills in clinical ultrasound imaging, therapy and surgery. It will also provide research training in literature searching and critical appraisal, experimental design, data analysis and communication skills.

Core contents includes:

  • basic physics of ultrasound
  • basic concepts and principles of medical imaging instrumentation
  • production, propagation and interactions of ultrasound
  • ultrasound devices and instrumentation
  • ultrasound systems including imaging, high intensive ultrasound for therapy, and high power ultrasound for surgery
  • image function, quality, resolution, artefacts and safety

This module is designed to give the student a broad view of understanding of the medical engineering industry and applications in healthcare system. The aims are:

  • To provide a formal training on medical instrumentation applications and design, medical ethics and safety issues.
  • To provide an grounding in the theory of biomedical measurement systems, including sensors, signal conditioning methods, measurement techniques, patient interfacing and instrumentation used in biomedicine.
  • To impart the fundamentals of the special aspects of instrumentation design that are required for biomedical instruments.
  • To demonstrate how modern biomedical instruments combine traditional instrumentation techniques and technological innovation, including software presentation and analysis of data.
  • To provide training related to the legislative and professional framework that governs medical instruments together with associated managerial, professional and inter-professional issues encountered in clinical practice. The resulting framework of knowledge and skills supports safe and equitable practice.

Core contents includes:

  1. basic concepts and principles of medical instrumentation used in physiological measurement
  2. basic concepts and principles of medical imaging instrumentation, static and dynamic characteristics of measurement systems, noise and noise reduction
  3. measurement constraints in the clinical environment, invasive and non-invasive measurements and medical imaging
  4. biomedical and chemical biosensors
  5. measurement of blood pressure, blood flow and blood volume, pulse oximetry and respiratory performance
  6. clinical laboratory instrumentation and applications in patient monitoring
  7. protection and safety: medical ethics, general safety, electrical safety, biological hazards, chemical safety, radiation protection

 

Modules for starting in September 2020

Level 2, Semester 1

The  aim  of  this  module  is  to  provide  broad  experience  of  modern engineering software as applied to both the design process and as an embedded feature in products and systems.

This module focuses on the use of major engineering software tools for use in engineering applications and across enterprises. The intention is to provide both insight into the operation of modern engineering software and comprehensive hands-on experience of the use of this engineering software as preparation for engineering in industry.

The module introduces method of presenting and visualising ideas to an engineering audience through the use of 3-D design suites (e.g. SolidWorks) for the production of basic engineering drawings and 3-D solid models.

The Embedded Controllers portion will provide an introduction to the design of microcontroller systems with hardware and software, allowing students to gain the knowledge to develop simple embedded systems for their own designs.

This module will introduce students to the basic principles and applications of medical instrumentation. This includes the nature of physiological signals and how they can be acquired, analysed and visualised. The aim of the module is to provide the students with a grounding knowledge base which allows them to understand the state of the art technology and standard principles applied in medical instrumentation. The basic physiology of physiological signals, governing physics and mathematics will be introduced along with their application in a clinical setup. Students will furthermore develop prototypes of medical instruments in an accompanying laboratory session.

Core contents includes:

  1. Fundamentals of medical instrumentation: medical instrumentation systems; requirements on medical instruments; design criteria
  2. Introduction to sensors and signal processing: transducers, sensors and instruments; calibration; accuracy and error; amplifiers; filters; software and hardware signal processing
  3. Nature of biomedical signals: physical signals (force, torque, flow, pressure as well as thermal, geometric and kinematic quantities); biopotentials; chemical signals
  4. Transducers of biomedical signals and their application: biopotential electrodes and amplifiers; pressure sensors; flow sensors; optical sensors;  electrochemical sensors
  5. Therapeutic devices: pacemakers and defibrillators; ventilators
  6. Regulations and safety measures

This module gives students a firm grounding in the principles of biomechanics and biomaterials. The module aims to equip students to undertake analysis of mechanical structures. Here the fundamental principles of mechanics will be applied to the human body as a load bearing structure. Furthermore the students will be introduced to biomaterials, in particular their properties and behaviour.

Core contents includes:

  1. Fundamental principles in solid mechanics: force diagrams, section properties, bending and deflection, torsion and shear force actions in beams; relationship between stress and strain; relationship between load and structural response; failure criteria.
  2. Introduction to biomechanics of human tissue: bone and soft tissue; load-deformation, stress-strain; elasticity, viscosity, viscoelasticity; anisotropy.
  3. Introduction to biomaterials: natural and synthetic materials; mechanical properties of biomaterials; tissue mimicking.

The aim of this module is to explore the basic structure, organisation and function of the human body.
Core contents includes:

  1. basic body forms and systems
  2. structure and organisation of the body systems including: respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, urogenital, nervous and musculoskeletal systems
  3. histology of epithelium, connective tissues, muscle and neural tissues
  4. basic biomechanics, nerve conduction and the neuromuscular junction

The module continues the development of the basic mathematics most relevant to engineers and covers material required for accreditation of degree programmes in engineering.

Core contents includes:

  1. Vectors: revision of basic properties, scalar and vector products; applications to polygon of forces, centres of mass, work, moments and three-dimensional geometry of lines and planes.
  2. Algebra: sequences and series, summation of finite series, including the binomial series; limits of sequences, infinite series.
  3. Statistics: data displays and summaries, including histograms, dot plots, scatter plots; mean and standard deviation (including variance); median, quartiles and the range; box and whisker plots. Probability including events, P(A) notation, addition and multiplication rules; the normal distribution. Statistical inference including populations and samples, sampling distributions; standard errors; confidence interval for the mean and for the difference between two means; t- tests as an alternative but less informative analysis than confidence intervals; linear regression analysis.
  4. Complex numbers: definition, arithmetic, modulus-argument form; Argand diagram; De Moivre's theorem; roots of polynomial equations; properties of ez
  5. Differential Equations: review of rules of differentiation; revision of elementary integration to include applications to the solution of first order separable ordinary differential equations; solution of first and second order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients (including general solutions and solutions satisfying initial conditions and boundary conditions).
  6. Functions of One Variable: functions of a single variable, definition and notation; standard functions and their inverses (including hyperbolic and inverse hyperbolic functions).
  7. Limits, including limits involving infinity; asymptotes; continuous and discontinuous functions; curve sketching involving rational functions (illustrating maxima, minima and points of inflection) and conic sections (including translation of axes); normals, curvature; descriptive treatment of Rolle's theorem, mean-value theorem; Taylor polynomials and Taylor's theorem; L'Hopital's rules.
  8. Integration; further examples of the standard methods of integration, applications of integration to arc length, areas, volumes and surfaces of revolution, centres of mass, moments of inertia (first and second moments of area).

This module provides an introduction to analogue and digital electronics and software for application in measurement and control systems. It also serves as prerequisite in subsequent modules in electronics, and project work. It is offered to Physics, Electronic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering students.

Core contents includes: the ideal op-amp and applications, combinational and basic sequential logic, sensors and actuators, block diagrams and equivalent circuits, non-idealities, frequency and transient response, noise and linearity, signal sampling and A to D conversion, D to A conversion and reconstruction, data transmission and interfaces, programmable instruments, LabView programming for measurement and control, test protocols and troubleshooting. 

This module gives students a firm grounding in the principles of machines and to equip them to undertake analysis and design of machines.

Core contents includes: electric motors, hydraulic and pneumatic systems, logic and programmable control, dynamic analysis, design for reliability. 

Biomedical engineering offers a huge opportunity for growth, exploration and innovation.  The strong analytical, practical and transferable skills that you will gain from this course will enable you to enter a wide range of medical related industries in the UK and abroad, as well as the NHS.

Many students continue as professional engineers into careers such as Medical Engineering and Medical Physics or work for leading industrial companies such as GE or Phillips.

The fees you pay will depend on your fee status. Your fee status is determined by us using the information you provide on your application.

 Find out more about fee status

Fees for students starting 2019-20

Fee categoryFees for students starting 2019-20
Scottish and EU students £1,820 per year of study
Rest of UK students £9,250 per year, for a maximum of 3 years, even if you are studying a four year degree. See our scholarships for rest of UK applicants.
Overseas students (non-EU) £20,950 per year of study

Scottish and EU students can apply to the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) to have tuition fees paid by the Scottish Government.

Rest of the UK students can apply for financial assistance, including a loan to cover the full cost of the tuition fees, from the Student Loans Company.

Tuition fees for Overseas (non-EU) students are guaranteed not to increase by more than 3% per year, for the length of your course.

Additional costs

You may incur additional costs in the course of your education at the University over and above tuition fees in an academic year.

Examples of additional costs:

One off costOngoing costIncidental cost
Graduation feeStudio feeField trips

*these are examples only and are not exhaustive.

Additional costs:

  • may be mandatory or optional expenses
  • may be one off, ongoing or incidental charges and certain costs may be payable annually for each year of your programme of study
  • vary depending on your programme of study
  • are payable by you and are non-refundable and non-transferable

Unfortunately, failure to pay additional costs may result in limitations on your student experience.

For additional costs specific to your course please speak to our Enquiry Team.


Unistats data set (formerly the Key Information Set (KIS) Unistats data set - formerly the Key Information Set (KIS)

  Degree UCAS Code
Apply NowBiomedical Engineering BEng (Hons)H160