Biological and Biomedical Sciences (joint degree with National University of Singapore) BSc (Hons)

  • Entry: September
  • Duration: 4 years
  • Study Abroad: Yes
  • Study Mode: Full Time
  • UCAS: B9C1
Life Sciences Building
microscope
TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework

Spend the first part of your degree in Dundee, Scotland, to build your skills and knowledge in cutting-edge biology theory and techniques before attending the National University of Singapore (ranked No.1 university in Asia and No.11 in the world, QS Rankings 2019) for 18 months to complete your honours project. You'll gain valuable international experience as well as attending two of the world's best-known universities for biological and biomedical sciences.

You'll be making the most of each university’s strength in the field of biosciences. The course will provide a firm grounding in biological sciences and develop a complementary specialism in one of the following:

  • Genetic Medicine
  • Neurobiology
  • Physiology and Ageing

Through skills training and research-led theory you’ll build your confidence. You'll learn to be a self-reflective and critical thinker. In an international teaching environment, you’ll rise to tackle the challenges in this field using the latest methodologies and problem-solving techniques. There will be ample opportunity to network, collaborate, and shape your career.

You will graduate with an appreciation of different cultures and an understanding of the global aspects of life sciences research and application.

From day one, you will be enrolled at both the University of Dundee and the National University of Singapore. This means you can start collaborating and sharing experiences with your Singaporean counterparts and get access to the services of each university. You will travel abroad to study in Singapore after you have completed semester 1, level 3.

YouTube Poster Image (Cached)

 

World class research

In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF) exercise, the University of Dundee was ranked no.1 in the UK for the quality of its biological sciences research.

Degree flexibility

We designed the course with flexibility in mind. It gives you time to explore and develop a deep understanding of biological and biomedical sciences.

At the end of semester 1 in level 3, you will choose your specialisation from Genetic medicine, Neurobiology or Physiology and ageing.

YouTube Poster Image (Cached)

The following are the minimum, up-to-date entry requirements.

Courses starting 2018 and 2019
Qualification Level 1 Entry Advanced Entry to Level 2
SQA Higher/Advanced Higher AABB at Higher including biology and chemistry, plus mathematics (Standard Grade at 3 or National 5/Intermediate2 at C) Level 2 entry is not possible to this course
GCE A-Level ABB (minimum) - AAB (typical) including A-Level biology and chemistry, plus GCSE mathematics at C / 4 Level 2 entry is not possible to this course
BTEC BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma can be considered for the Foundation Year in Life Sciences. Level 2 entry is not possible to this course
International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma 30 points at Higher Level grades 5, 5, 5 to include biology and chemistry, plus Standard Level mathematics at grade 4.
A combination of IB Certificate plus other qualifications, such as A-Levels, Advanced Placement Tests or the International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme (IBCP), will also be considered.
Level 2 entry is not possible to this course
Irish Leaving Certificate (ILC) H2H2H3H3 at Higher Level including biology and chemistry, plus Ordinary Level mathematics at O2 Level 2 entry is not possible to this course
Graduate Entry
SQA Higher National (HNC/HND) A relevant HNC with grade A in the graded unit with appropriate Science units Level 2 entry is not possible to this course
Scottish Baccalaureate Distinction with AB at AH Biology and Chemistry. Mathematics at SG (grade 3) or Intermediate 2 / National 5 (grade C) Level 2 entry is not possible to this course
SWAP Access Relevant science subjects with AAA grades to include Chemistry and Biology/Human Biology at SCQF Level 6 Level 2 entry is not possible to this course
Advanced Diploma Applicants with this qualification would be considered for Level 2 entry Level 2 entry is not possible to this course
Welsh Baccalaureate Pass with A-Levels in Biology and Chemistry at AB. Mathematics at GCSE grade C / 4 Level 2 entry is not possible to this course
European Baccalaureate 70% overall with 7 in Biology and Chemistry Level 2 entry is not possible to this course
Other Qualifications
Notes

 EU and International qualifications



English Language Requirement

For non EU students

IELTS Overall 6.0
Listening 5.5
Reading 5.5
Writing 6.0
Speaking 5.5

 Equivalent grades from other test providers

 

English Language Programmes

We offer Pre-Sessional and Foundation Programme(s) throughout the year. These are designed to prepare you for university study in the UK when you have not yet met the language requirements for direct entry onto a degree programme.

 Discover our English Language Programmes

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF)

The University of Dundee has been given a Gold award – the highest possible rating – in the 2017 Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF).

Read more about the Teaching Excellence Framework

How you will be taught

  • lectures
  • practicals
  • workshops
  • tutorials
  • computer-based learning
  • media / video exercises

 

The University of Dundee achieved 100% student satisfaction for Biology

National Student Survey (2017)

How you will be assessed

All modules are assessed by a combination of in-course and end-of-course assignments. Regular assessments, such as practical reports, computer-based exercises, essays and data processing exercises, provide feedback on your progress and help prepare you for end-of-module exams.

Online assignments are used at levels 1 and 2, many suited to access on or off campus. Peer assessment is used to promote teamwork and group learning.

What you will study

Modules are as follows for 2017-18 but may be subject to change as part of our normal processes designed to enhance teaching quality

Level 1

Semester 1

Number of credits: 10

This module will broaden knowledge and understanding of atomic and molecular structure, enzyme function, energy and thermodynamics that can be applied to the Life Sciences.

Topics include:

  • molecular structure and biochemical properties (to include organisation and charge/polarity) of nucleotides,  lipids and phospholipids, carbohydrates and amino acids
  • protein structure (primary to quaternary)
  • biological enzymes and their importance in the catalysis of biochemical reactions
  • energy and thermodynamics relating to biochemical reactions

Credits: 10

Semester: 1

Natural selection has favoured structures whose shape and composition contribute to their function. This module aims to broaden knowledge and understanding of the evolution of animal, plant and microbial cell structure and function, including organelles and membranes.

Topics include:

  • cellular evolution
  • interpretation of phylogenetic analysis
  • evolution of organelles
  • membrane structure and transport
  • key features of life and death of animal, plant and microbial cells

Semester: 1

Number of credits: 10

This module will start with a mandatory introduction to health and safety, basic lab skills and equipment. There will be one field excursion (Botanic Gardens, Perth Road, Dundee) and a series of practical classes that will cover techniques of isolation and culture of microorganisms and gram staining, isolation and identification of terpenes from plant material, enzyme kinetics, thermodynamics and PCR.

Semester: 1

Number of credits: 10

This module will extend and develop the generic skills introduced in BS11003 with specific emphasis on health and safety and basic laboratory practice. The ability to work effectively as part of a group will form a significant part of this module. You will extend your information literacy skills by locating and accessing scientific resources to support your learning.

To support the group lab project, you will receive guidance on lab book / record keeping, experimental design and project planning, in addition to interpretation of data and presentation of project results. You'll also be encouraged to reflect on and evaluate your own learning throughout the semester, identifying areas for development and consolidation.

Semester: 2

Number of credits: 10

This module aims to broaden knowledge and understanding of the flow of genetic information (DNA to mRNA to protein), cell division (to include mitosis, meiosis and binary fission) and the cell cycle. 

Topics include:

  • cellular reproduction (DNA replication, mitosis, meiosis and binary fission)
  • an introduction to the cell cycle
  • an introduction to genes and gene expression
  • an introduction to ribosomes and their function
  • multigene, polygene inheritance of traits
  • an introduction to population genetics
  • genetical theory of natural selection

Semester: 2

Number of credits: 10

Physiological functions are often compartmentalised into different cells, tissues, organs and systems which have structures that support specialised activities. This module aims to broaden knowledge and understanding of the development of systems (e.g. neural, respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and excretory) with reference to model organisms (e.g. nematodes, Drosophila, zebra fish, chick, mouse).

Topics include:

  • an introduction to the development of an organism, with reference to the germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm)
  • an overview of the key features of the body plan
  • model organisms commonly used in scientific research (e.g. nematodes, Drosophila, zebra fish, chick, mouse)
  • developmental origins of the following systems (with reference to the selected model organisms covered previously): neural, cardiovascular, respiratory, musculoskeletal, dermal, gastrointestinal and excretory

Semester: 2

Number of credits: 10

This module will extend and develop laboratory and research skills introduced in semester 1 of Level 1

  • Optical techniques – Students will use a spectrophotometer to produce a standard absorbance spectrum, apply the Beer -Lambert Law to derive unknown concentrations from known values of absorbance and perform a Bradford Assay
  • Protein purification – Students will experience two techniques that are commonly used to separate mixtures of proteins: size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) 
  • PCR - In conjunction with its associated workshop, this laboratory exercise aims to give students a basic understanding of the practical application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the use of agarose gel electrophoresis for the analysis of DNA samples.
  • Enzyme kinetics – Students will gain practical experience of a typical enzyme assay procedure.
  • Digital skills – online scientific literature searches
  • Protein expression – Students will learn how to purify and analyse a recombinant protein.

Semester: 2

Number of credits: 10

This module will extend and develop the generic skills introduced in BS12003 with specific emphasis on data presentation, interpretation and analysis. The ability to work effectively as part of a group and the  application of peer support and peer-assessment will form a significant part of this module. Students will extend their information literacy and scientific writing skills by researching and presenting an area of current research in poster format, giving due attention to scientific writing protocols. Students will be encouraged to reflect on  and evaluate their own learning throughout the semester, identifying areas for development and consolidation and setting appropriate targets.

Level 2

Semester 1

Number of credits: 10

An introduction to statistics for the biosciences, bringing you up to speed on the structure of datasets and how one infers differences. This will include an introduction to the design of experiments, concepts of randomisation and blocking. Regression and Multiple regression; ANOVA (including posthoc testing); principle tests of signal versus noise. You will also be introduced to appropriate graphing and representation of data. You will be expected to complete a substantial piece of coursework related to a component of the indicative content.

Semester 1

Number of credits: 10

To introduce and broaden knowledge and understanding of key inter- and intra-cellular communication mechanisms with reference to selected examples of relevance to both biological and biomedical contexts. This module will provide you with an overview of inter- and intra-cellular communication mechanisms (e.g. paracrine, endocrine, hormonal and neural) and subsequent cell responses.

On successful completion of the module you will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • key extracellular signalling molecules, receptor types and cell response (e.g. changes in gene expression and protein modifications)
  • the general modes of action of steroid and peptide hormones
  • neurotransmission (e.g. compare and contrast with hormones)
  • nitric oxide signalling in the cardiovascular system
  • plant cell signalling
  • regulation of the cell cycle

Skills:

  • access and use a range of defined and self- selected (with guidance) learning resources to further your studies
  • evaluate own learning, identifying strengths and weaknesses within criteria largely set by others
  • use the knowledge gained to solve a set of typical problems in the biological sciences
  • work individually and in groups to extract pertinent information from the scientific literature

Semester 1

Number of credits: 10

This module will broaden and strengthen both your practical, laboratory research and generic skills by building on your Level 1 or other previous experience (direct Level 2 entrant students will have an opportunity to learn skills and techniques at the start of Semester 1).

  • an introduction to basic lab techniques and the use of commonly-used lab equipment
  • interpretation of experimental data through use of basic descriptive statistical analyses and graphical  representation (using R)
  • introduction of the concepts of osmolarity and tonicity
  • retrieval of sequence information (genetic, cDNA and amino acid) from internet databases and to use this information to perform basic sequence alignments
  • comparison of kinetic and thermodynamic control in protein folding and application of the concept to a series of problems during a work shop session
  • the broad use of antibodies in Biological Sciences
  • use of aseptic techniques through handling of bacteria

Semester 1

Number of credits: 10

Students will carry out two laboratory projects which will allow them to gain experience in the use of laboratory equipment and techniques.  The projects will cover basic organic synthesis of biological molecules and also a forensic chemistry investigation.  These projects will allow them to improve their experimental planning, risk assessment, report writing and data analysis skills.  Group work will involve oral and written presentation skills and provide team building experience.

Module not available to non-Life Science students except forensic anthropology and anatomical science students

Semester 2

Number of credits: 20

The aim of this module is to introduce you to the physiology, pharmacology and anatomy of specific topics within the Biomedical Sciences, including:

  • Nerve and muscle: the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), muscle contraction and body movements
  • Cardiovascular system: heart function and integrated control of blood pressure
  • Pharmacology of NMJ and cardiovascular system
  • Respiratory system: mechanics of ventilation and factors influencing gas exchange

Number of credits: 20

The aim of this module is to give you a sound foundation in biomolecular mechanisms and processes. This module will study the main mammalian metabolic pathways and their control including the molecular processes involved. The module will also look at current topics in microbiology including disease and resistance and introduce immunology and virology.

Semester 2

Number of credits: 20

The aim of this module is to broaden and strengthen both the practical and generic skills of students by building on experience gained at level 1 and semester 1 of level 2.

The module will expand on techniques and skills introduced in earlier practical modules.  Practicals will be accompanied by data handling and manipulation workshops.  Basic concepts in ethics in the Biosciences will be introduced in a workshop.  Careers and employability exercises will help students to decide on their future career paths.  Generic skills will be reinforced by updating students’ PDP.

Module not available to non-Life Science students except forensic anthropology and anatomical science students

In order to progress to study in National University of Singapore, you must attain a minimum average of B3 (16 points out of 23) at the University of Dundee.

Biological and Biomedical Sciences BSc (Honours) – Levels 3 and 4

You'll spend the first semester of level 3 at the University of Dundee. You will then choose your specialism and transfer to the National University of Singapore for the remainder of your degree

Semester 1

Number of credits: 15

The aim of this Module is to introduce specific topics within the area of molecular structure and interactions analysis that will underpin the more specialised areas which students will encounter in Semester 2 of Level 3 and in Level 4. The module also aims to introduce students to the study of interactions that underpin biological events or early-stage drug discovery and strengthen students’ skills in scientific writing, critical analysis of scientific literature and in self-directed learning.

Topics covered in the module are High-throughput DNA sequencing and genome annotation, Secondary structure, disorder, post-translational modification, cloning, single crystal X-ray diffraction methods, Use of bioinformatics resources and databases, Scientific paper analysis.

Semester 1

Number of credits: 15

The aim of this module is to introduce specific topics within the area of Biochemistry and Cell Biology that will underpin the more specialised areas that you will encounter in Semester 2 of Level 3 and in Level 4. The module also aims to strengthen your skills in critical analysis of scientific literature, in science communication and in self-directed learning.

Topics covered in the module are separated into four distinct themes: Core Biochemistry (including how proteins function at the molecular level, energy metabolism and photosynthesis); Core Cell Biology, From Tissues To Cells (including cell adhesion, the extracellular matrix and molecular motors); Core Cell Biology, Cell Signalling (including metabolic and developmental signalling pathways); and Systems & Synthetic Biology (including new ways of working and applications of synthetic biology).

Semester 1

Number of credits: 15

The aim of this module is to introduce you to specific topics within the area of Gene Regulation and Expression that will underpin the more specialised areas, which you will encounter in Semester 2 of Level 3 and in Level 4. This module will focus on the principles underlying the following fundamental processes: transcription, RNA splicing, RNA modification, chromatin and epigenetics, DNA replication, chromosome segregation, DNA recombination and repair. You will come away with a fundamental understanding of these processes in molecular biology in relation to cellular function and will be able to apply this knowledge to explain mechanisms in biomedically relevant disease states.

Genetic Medicine - Levels 3 and 4

Neurobiology - Levels 3 and 4

Physiology and Ageing - Levels 3 and 4

Level 4

You will undertake a research project as part of a world-class research lab. This project will require you to draw upon a wide range of skills and knowledge gained in the preceding 3 years to produce a significant piece of independent research. This research should address a scientific question relevant to your degree specialisation. 

You’ll develop as an effective communicator and have ample opportunity to gain a range of transferable skills: IT, information sourcing, evaluations, problem solving, team-working and project management. You’ll also get an appropriate understanding of ethical and regulatory issues.

Our graduates find employment in a wide variety of destinations related to biomedicine and healthcare, including:

  • research in universities, research institutes and the pharmaceutical industry
  • teaching in schools, colleges and universities
  • graduate entry to a degree in medicine or dentistry

The scientific training and problem-solving skills you’ll gain are highly valued in other areas, such as:

  • government research institutes
  • pharmaceutical, biotechnology & food industries
  • academic research & teaching

What do our students go on to do?                   

  • wildlife management MSc
  • medical science writer
  • investment banking in life science stocks
  • PhD
  • business technology consulting
  • production assistant at BBC
  • monitoring officer for International Organisation for Migration (Somalia)
  • international big-pharma research (USA)

Our Global Reputation

  • Royal Society of Biology Accreditation for all Biological and Biomedical Sciences BSc Hons degree programmes
  • No.1 in UK for overall student satisfaction for Biology degrees NSS 2017
  • In the world’s top 100 for Biological Sciences in QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017
  • No.1 in UK and 26 in the world for research impact on global innovation (Nature Index 2017)
  • Ranked no.1 biology department in the UK in the National Student Survey 2016
    • Staff are good at explaining things
    • Staff are enthusiastic
    • The course is intellectually stimulating
    • Plus, all four learning resources criteria

The fees you pay will depend on your fee status. Your fee status is determined by us using the information you provide on your application.

 Find out more about fee status

Fees for students starting 2019-20

Fee categoryFees for students starting 2019-20
Scottish and EU students £1,820 per year of study
Rest of UK students £9,250 per year of study See our scholarships for rest of UK applicants.
Overseas students (non-EU) £20,950 per year of study See our scholarships for international applicants.

Scottish and EU students can apply to the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) to have tuition fees paid by the Scottish Government.

Rest of the UK students can apply for financial assistance, including a loan to cover the full cost of the tuition fees, from the Student Loans Company.

Tuition fees for Overseas (non-EU) students are guaranteed not to increase by more than 3% per year, for the length of your course.

Additional costs

You may incur additional costs in the course of your education at the University over and above tuition fees in an academic year.

Examples of additional costs:

One off costOngoing costIncidental cost
Graduation feeStudio feeField trips

*these are examples only and are not exhaustive.

Additional costs:

  • may be mandatory or optional expenses
  • may be one off, ongoing or incidental charges and certain costs may be payable annually for each year of your programme of study
  • vary depending on your programme of study
  • are payable by you and are non-refundable and non-transferable

Unfortunately, failure to pay additional costs may result in limitations on your student experience.

For additional costs specific to your course please speak to our Enquiry Team.


Unistats data set (formerly the Key Information Set (KIS) Unistats data set - formerly the Key Information Set (KIS)

  Degree UCAS Code
Apply NowBiological and Biomedical Sciences (joint degree with National University of Singapore) BSc (Hons)B9C1