• For Entry: September
  • Duration: 3 years
  • Award: BSc
  • Study Abroad: No
  • Study Mode: Full Time

We offer the only Human Computer Interaction Honours degree in the UK. You’ll gain an understanding of computing, focussing on user experience.

TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework

Applied Computing: Human Computer Interaction focuses on user experience rather than more theoretical concepts. In particular, it contains less computer programming content than our Applied Computing degree. It is the degree to study if you wish to be a market ready User Experience expert in only 3 years. 

This course will equip you with the necessary knowledge, skills and understanding in computing and software development to enable you to play a leading role in the application of computing in industry, commerce and research, especially within the field of Human Computer Interaction. 

Dundee's School of Computing has a 30-year international reputation for excellence in the area of Human Computer Interaction, particularly for specialist user populations. For example, we have a 'user pool' for those with complicated communication needs and for older adults.

State-of-the-art facilities

Students can use a range of equipment such as servers, Macs, Arduino systems and programming kit for games consoles such as the Nintendo Wii and Sony Playstation.

You will have 24-hour access to our award winning Queen Mother Building. It has an unusual mixture of lab space and breakout areas, with a range of conventional and special equipment for you to use. You can use your own laptop, if you wish to; wireless access is available throughout the building.

Who should study this course?

If you have an interest in computing, an aptitude for practical problem solving and scientific principles, and enjoy thinking outside the box, then this course is for you.

You do not need any advanced mathematics or prior programming knowledge to take this course.

YouTube Poster Image (Cached)

The following are the minimum, up-to-date entry requirements.

Courses starting 2018
Qualification Level 1 Entry Advanced Entry to Level 2
SQA Higher/Advanced Higher BB at Higher plus B at Advanced Higher including two sciences. Mathematics (Standard Grade at 3 or National 5/Intermediate2 at C) is recommended.
Please see Notes below for a list of suitable science subjects.
GCE A-Level ABB including two science subjects. GCSE mathematics at C is recommended.
Please see Notes below for a list of suitable science subjects.
Irish Leaving Certificate (ILC) Entry to this degree is not possible with this qualification
International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma 32 points at Higher Level grades 6, 5, 5 to include two science subjects (computing science is recommended). Standard Level mathematics at grade 4 is recommended.
Please see Notes below for a list of suitable science subjects.
A combination of IB Certificate plus other qualifications, such as A-Levels, Advanced Placement Tests or the International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme (IBCP), will also be considered.
Graduate Entry
BTEC A relevant BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma with DDD.
SQA Higher National (HNC/HND) A relevant HNC with A in the Graded Unit and 120 SCQF credits. A relevant HND with BB in the Graded Units
Scottish Baccalaureate Pass with BB at AH in 2 Sciences or Mathematics and a Science
SWAP Access
Advanced Diploma Grade B with ASL-A Levels in 2 Sciences/ Mathematics and a Science at AB
Welsh Baccalaureate Pass with A Levels in 2 Sciences/Mathematics and a Science at AB
European Baccalaureate 75% overall with 7.5 in 2 Sciences or Mathematics and a Science
Other Qualifications
Notes Suitable science subjects include: information technology, mathematics, chemistry, biology, human biology, physics, psychology or computing science.

 EU and International qualifications



English Language Requirement

For non EU students

IELTS Overall 6.0
Listening 5.5
Reading 5.5
Writing 6.0
Speaking 5.5

 Equivalent grades from other test providers

 

English Language Programmes

We offer Pre-Sessional and Foundation Programme(s) throughout the year. These are designed to prepare you for university study in the UK when you have not yet met the language requirements for direct entry onto a degree programme.

 Discover our English Language Programmes

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF)

The University of Dundee has been given a Gold award – the highest possible rating – in the 2017 Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF).

Read more about the Teaching Excellence Framework

How you will be taught

We know that the best way to learn how to design good software is to practise designing good software. You will learn to apply good software engineering principles, whatever the language or technology or platform: Java, C++, C#, Unity, ASP.NET, SQL, NoSQL OpenGL, UNIX and many more. In addition, you will study the interaction between humans and computers so that you can design successful systems that are intuitive and well-received.

We also know how important it is to be at the leading edge of computing and so you will learn from research-active staff. Leading researchers teach from your first year through to your final year. Our smaller classes mean that we really get to know you, making for an informal and supportive community.

Industrial collaboration is part of our ethos too, so we regularly include guest experts from industry.

How you will be assessed

You will be assessed by a combination of practical coursework (20% - 60% of a module mark, typically) and end-of-semester examination.

Coursework is often very practical, e.g. writing computer programs, designing interfaces, writing reports, constructing web sites, testing software, implementing databases, analysing problems or presenting solutions to clients.

What you will study

Honours Degree

An honours degree for this programme takes three years as described below.

Typical Degree Programme

Level 1

You will cover the basics of programming, and start to think about how you can create programs for different purposes.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Iain Martin.

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer:

Dr Iain Martin, i.martin@dundee.ac.uk, 2.11 QMB

If you use email, please include "AC11001 " in the heading.


About the Module

"The best way to learn how to design good software is to think about the people who will be using it first, then to practice designing good software for those people"

AC11001 and the follow-on module AC12001 aim to provide you with the basic skills required to produce these solutions and to communicate the results effectively and professionally. They do this by providing you with extensive hands-on experience of problem-solving within an Applied Computing context, programming in Java, using a set of carefully designed and enjoyable scenarios. You will also have the opportunity to report on these solutions in a variety of ways.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 Introduction and user requirements
2 Object-oriented design
3 Coding tools: Your first Java program.
4 Methods, statements and operators in Java
5 Inheritance
6 Control structures
7 Arrays, collections and iterators
8 Working with text files
9 Project work
10 Project work (and class test)
11 Project work

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignment, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Project requirements and design 1 3 8 10
Exercises with classes 4 5 6 10
Exercises with program control 6 7 6 10
Working with text files and arrays 8 9 6 10
Individual Project 9 11 20 30
CLASS TEST 11 11 1 30

Resource List

All course material will be available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Alison Pease.

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer:

If you use email, please include "AC11002" in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of AC11002 is to give you the experience of web design through practical implementation tasks. You will use HTML and CSS as a base, and work on other client-side and server-side technologies. You will also consider the role and importance of the internet in society.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 How the web works: Historical and Social Aspects
2 Web development: html5
3 Web development: CSS
4 Web development: Javascript
5 Web development: Client Libraries
6 Independent Study
7 Designing for the Web: Accessibility and Design
8 Designing for the Web: Persona and User Stories
9 Server side Technologies, The Future of the Web
10 Website Presentations
11 Revision
12 Class Test

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Case study 1 4   20
Website development 1 9   60
Class test 1 12   20


Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Craig Ramsay

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC22004 " in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of this module is to provide a solid foundation in object-oriented analysis anddesign practices and principles, which will enable students to produce professional, high-quality specifications and designs for a software system using the industry standard UnifiedModeling Language (UML). It also considers other important areas of software engineeringsuch as software lifecycles and requirements specification.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Introduction and Software Lifecycles
2 Requirements management and specification and Use cases
3 Use Case Specifications, threat modelling 
4 Object-Oriented Analysis
5 UML Relationships
6 UML Packages and layers
7 UML sequence diagrams
8 Design patterns
9  State Transition Diagrams
10  Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Requirements, use cases and threat model 1 5   15
Structural, object-oriented design of a software model 1 8   13
Behavioural, object-oriented design and design patterns 1 10   12

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC22006 " in the heading.


About the Module

This course introduces you to physical computing, particularly programming microcontrollers, together with consideration of some of the important prototyping and testing issues concerning the use of computers systems. In particular, you will be made aware of the importance of well-designed human-computer interfaces and the extended interactional opportunities afforded by a rich range of sensors and actuators connected to
the microcontroller. 

Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Introduction to Physical Computing
2 Fundamentals of Arduino
3 Sensors
4 Actuators
5 Revision
6 Sensor project
7 The Internet of Things, Escape Rooms
8 Final Project
9 Final Project
10 Final Project
11 Revision
12  Class test

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Interesting Arduino 1 3 12 10
Sensor Project 5 7 25 20
Final Project 7 10 40 30

Reading List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Introduction to physical computing, interaction and interventions on digital objects. 

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Craig Ramsay

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see one of the lecturer(s):

Dr Craig Ramsay, cdramsay@dundee.ac.uk, 2.11 QMB

If you use email, please include "AC22007 " in the heading.


About the Module

 

"The best way to learn how to design good software is to design good software"

Applied Computing is about the design and implementation of original and imaginative solutions to meet the needs of users, and about communicating these solutions in a professional way.

AC12001 builds on the skills and knowledge you have gained in AC11001. The course aims to provide you with further experience in designing and implementing software, and give you further opportunities to communicate the results effectively and professionally. It does this by introducing and developing more advanced data structures and algorithms, and gives you the opportunity to apply these skills in a team project.

By the end of the course you will:

 

  • obtain further experience with the skills developed in AC11001 - programming, use of basic computer tools to develop programs, and transferable skills
  • have an understanding of the more commonly used data structures and algorithms
  • have knowledge of how these data structures and algorithms may be used in program design and implementation
  • gain experience in team work through an end of course project.

Credit Rating

There are 20 Scotcat points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 Linked Lists
2 Stacks
3 Queues
4 Sets
5 Recursion
6 Consolidation week
7 Binary Trees
8 Project work
9 Project work
10 Project work
11 Project Presentations / Revision
12  
13  

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.
Tutorial(s) count for 0 of the final module mark.


Resource List

A module handbook will be provided electronically containing worksheets and practical labsheets. It is up to you to take your own notes in class. Copies of any lecture overheads the lecturers use will be made available on Blackboard, with the handbook, and practical sheets.

Any books which you found helpful for AC11001 will also be helpful for AC12001. In addition, in the field of data structures and algorithms, there are many books about. The books mentioned below are some suggestions, but please browse in the library, and in bookshops. John Smith bookshop next to the College Shop on campus, Waterstones (Ottakars) in the city centre and Borders (near the bus station) all have reasonable selections of computing books, as do the major online booksellers.

Module reading list (from Library and Learning Centre)


Level 2

You will sharpen your degree focus with specialist modules in key areas. At this stage you are given more control over what languages you use and how you approach different problems.

Between second and third year, you can take a Work Placement which contributes to your degree. (see AC41010 Work Placement).

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Professor Chris Reed

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC31007 " in the heading.


About the Module

The course aims to give you an appreciation of agile methods in software engineering by contrasting these with more traditional methodologies. You will implement a significant software development project following the principles of Agile Software Engineering.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 Agile methods overview
2 User stories, backlogs and acceptance tests
3 Test-driven development, refactoring and pair programming
4 Test-driven development, refactoring and version control
5 Sprint 1
6 Sprint 1
7 Sprint 1 review and retrospective
8 Sprint 2
9 Sprint 2
10 Ethics, legal and professional issues, technical documentation
11 Review and retrospective
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Sprint 1 4 6 30 20
Sprint 2 7 9 30 20

Resource List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Professor John Arnott

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC31008 " in the heading.


About the Module

The course aims to equip you with a broad understanding of data communications techniques as seen in computer networks. This will be done through study of examples of data communications protocols and methods of communicating computer data.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 Introduction to Data Communications. Open Systems Integration (OSIRM), layered protocols, peer processes.
2 Data Link Layer, flow control, sliding window protocols, packet re-transmission. DNS.
3 Wide Area Networks (WANs), Packet routing, Network Layer, IP. The Internet.
4 Transport Layer, TCP, Transport connection across networks. Error Protection.
5 Local Area Networks (LANs - wired). IEEE 802 Protocols, CSMA/CD, Ethernet.
6 Physical Layer (1). Communications media and their physical characteristics; bandwidth and data rate.
7 Physical Layer (2). Modems, cellular operation, ADSL.
8 Local Area Networks (LANs - wireless). CSMA/CA.
9 Professional issues. Security.
10 Multimedia, Data compression, Application Layer.
11 Revision Week.
12 Revision Week.

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 20% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 80% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Domain Name System (DNS) and Network Monitor Exercise 4 8 15 20

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed fromMy Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.


Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Karen Petrie

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC31009 " in the heading.


About the Module

The course aims to explore contemporary concepts in games development. A comprehensive individual game project allows you to implement a game on a platform of your choice. The module is assessed entirely by coursework to allow time for full development of your game.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Game Design
2 Hardware and Software
3 Moral and Ethical Considerations
4 Graphics and Audio
5 Event driven programming and games programming
6 Design patterns
7 Design patterns group work
8 Design patterns group work
9 Game specific programming
10 Security in game programming
11 Elevator pitches for game
12 Time to work on game

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Games Concept Pitch 1 4 20 10
Elevator pitch 1 11 20 10
Create a tutorial 6 8 40 20
Professionalism 1 16 20 10
Full game development 1 16 100 50

Reading List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC32005 " in the heading.


About the Module

This module explores key concepts in Human Computer Interaction through practical tasks and critical evaluation of the research literature. This includes elements of the history and development of HCI, mobile HCI, situational impairments, review of published research papers, and a quantitative experiment to assess the quality of an interface.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 History of HCI
2 Presentations
3 Interaction Elements
4 Quantitative Methods
5 Experimental Design
6 Data
7 Statistical Analysis
8 Mobile HCI & Situational Impairments
9 Current Trends in HCI
10 Revision
11 Revision
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.


Assignments

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Presentation 1 2 20 20
Paper Discussion 3 5 10 10
Experiment Report 5 9 20 20

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Iain Murray

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC32006 " in the heading.


About the Module

This course aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the various database architectures, and teach the theory and practice of database design. We will study the relational model of databases, both from the theoretical standpoint of understanding why it has become so important, and from the more practical standpoint of how to design and build a database using this model. Practical illustration of theory is given throughout the course. The database engine that will be used will be primarily MySQL; however alternative relational databases will be discussed.

Alternative database topics, including data warehouses, OLAP and data mining will also be covered.

The aim is to give you a sound understanding of the principles of database design and for you to develop the ability to employ this understanding in building databases which will work correctly and efficiently in a real-world context.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Introduction / Review - Conceptual Database Design / ER Diagrams
2 Review - Physical Database Design / Guest lecture: Data Warehousing
3 Transactions / Views / Security
4 PHP as a database interface
5 Hypermedia and Graph Databases
6 Online Analytical Processing (OLAP)
7 Data mining
8 Data Visualisation
9 Multimedia Databases
10 Real-time and Object-Oriented Databases
11 Revision
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Database design  2  5  8 10
Database implementation  6  10  20 30

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Level 3

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Iain Martin

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC41001 " in the heading.


About the Module

The unit covers three-dimensional, interactive, colour computer graphics.

The two main aims of the unit are:

  • To study the algorithms that underpin modern computer graphics.
  • To provide experience in programming computer-generated images of 3D scenes

The unit begins by looking at environments for writing modern graphics code and understanding how to create and render basic scenes. The theory of the graphics pipeline and shader coding is discussed at an early stage and revisited throughout the module with an emphasis of relating theory to practical examples. Some elementary theory from co-ordinate geometry is reviewed in order to understand more complex computer graphics algorithms that are used later. We then examine three-dimensional, colour and interactive graphics, along with animation techniques.

As each topic is addressed, the underlying algorithms will be discussed, and their practical implementation will be described with practical programming experience through labs and assignments. A major objective of the unit is to provide students with first-hand experience of modern graphics programming.


Credit Rating

There are 15 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1  
2  
3  
4 Graphics programming environments, OpenGL and our first graphics programs.
5 The graphics pipeline, GPU shaders, vectors, matrices.
6 Transformations and projections
7 Colour, lighting and shading
8 Textures, depth buffer, blending, antialasing, fog
9 Procedural graphics generation, L-systems, fractal surfaces, noise
10 Shadow casting, normal mapping and particle animations
11 Geometry and tessellation shaders, ray tracing and radiosity
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Programming assignment 1 6 8 20 20
Programming assignment 2 9 12 20 20

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Craig Ramsay

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC41004 " in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of the module is to provide you with an opportunity to increase your knowledge and understanding, and to refine your skills in software development as a member of a project team working on an assignment set by an industrial client. The project also enables you to consolidate and put into practice the knowledge, skills and understanding which you have previously gained in areas such as HCI & Usability Engineering, Software Engineering and GUI programming.

Working in small teams (5-7), you will undertake a user-centred software development project to the brief given at the first meeting with the client. During the course of the project your team will be required to:

  • Design and develop a series of evolving prototype solutions;
  • Present your prototype solutions to the client for feedback;
  • Organise the team's effort to maximise use of its skills;
  • Provide regular updates to the senior management team on progress and plans;
  • Negotiate with the customer on changes in requirements to ensure timely delivery of the final product;
  • Deliver a maintainable software solution;
  • Manage the expectations of the customer;
  • Manage workloads such that team members operate within their capacity;

The team, with you as a member, will be responsible for all aspects of project planning including time allocation, task assignment, etc. As a team you will be required to design, implement and test the solution and to report on progress to the project manager and other reviewers at various stages throughout the project.

You are expected to produce reliable, usable and maintainable software.

Each team member should maintain a personal log documenting their contribution to the team's goals and their individual deliverables.


Credit Rating

There are 15 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

The module will be run in the first semester during weeks 1-3 and will occupy 100% of the available time of each team member during that period. You will have no other modules running during this time.

During these three weeks you will have regular meetings with the lecturer and the client in order to track your progress.


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Final report and presentation 1 3 120 100

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC42001 " in the heading.


About the Module

Research Frontiers is a final year module which runs in the second semester. In this module, you will be exposed to highly focused areas of leading edge research in computing. You will gain a detailed understanding of computing research topics, which developing transferable skills connected with approaches to research and advanced development.

AC42001 is a 30 credit module and AC42002 is a 15 credit module. It consists of two blocks; from which you will select topics to study. The topics available will be indicated to you in a presentation at the end of semester 1. These will be drawn from the research expertise within computing.

AC42001: You will select a total of four units, two from the first block and two from the second block.

AC42002: You will select a total of two units, one from the first block and one from the second.


Credit Rating

There are 30 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject

1

Block 1

2

Block 1

3

Block 1

4

Block 1

5

Block 1

6

Block 2

7

Block 2

8

Block 2

9

Block 2

10

Block 2


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments. Assignments will be made available within each option. The total coursework mark for each option is worth 25% of your overall grade.


Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

One module from the following

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Iain Martin

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC41001 " in the heading.


About the Module

The unit covers three-dimensional, interactive, colour computer graphics.

The two main aims of the unit are:

  • To study the algorithms that underpin modern computer graphics.
  • To provide experience in programming computer-generated images of 3D scenes

The unit begins by looking at environments for writing modern graphics code and understanding how to create and render basic scenes. The theory of the graphics pipeline and shader coding is discussed at an early stage and revisited throughout the module with an emphasis of relating theory to practical examples. Some elementary theory from co-ordinate geometry is reviewed in order to understand more complex computer graphics algorithms that are used later. We then examine three-dimensional, colour and interactive graphics, along with animation techniques.

As each topic is addressed, the underlying algorithms will be discussed, and their practical implementation will be described with practical programming experience through labs and assignments. A major objective of the unit is to provide students with first-hand experience of modern graphics programming.


Credit Rating

There are 15 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1  
2  
3  
4 Graphics programming environments, OpenGL and our first graphics programs.
5 The graphics pipeline, GPU shaders, vectors, matrices.
6 Transformations and projections
7 Colour, lighting and shading
8 Textures, depth buffer, blending, antialasing, fog
9 Procedural graphics generation, L-systems, fractal surfaces, noise
10 Shadow casting, normal mapping and particle animations
11 Geometry and tessellation shaders, ray tracing and radiosity
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Programming assignment 1 6 8 20 20
Programming assignment 2 9 12 20 20

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Jianguo Zhang

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC41002" in the heading.


About the Module

Providing computers with the ability to "see" is the subject of continuing and fast-moving research. This course provides a practical introduction to both the underlying technology and its applications. Applications areas include automated inspection in manufacturing, biomedical image analysis, vehicle guidance, face and gesture recognition, and robotics. The aim of this course is to provide you with an understanding of Computer Vision techniques and their application, through practical experiences.


Credit Rating

There are 15 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1  
2  
3  
4 Introduction, histograms and thresholds, colour
5 image formation, sampling, spatial and frequency domains
6 Filters, scale, edges, optic flow
7 Feature points, feature matching
8 Grouping and segmentation
9 Classification and recognition
10 Recognition and tracking
11 Tutorial and debate
12 Presentations and revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 30% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 70% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Computer Vision Software 6 11-12 30 30

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Professor Annalu Waller

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC41007" in the heading.


About the Module

AC41007 will have students develop a commercial market understanding that complements technical and computer science knowledge and an understanding for product management. Ultimately, students will have an understanding of the roles of product development and product marketing and the potential career path of product development for engineers. The module is a mix of case studies, practical exercises, and theoretical topics. The
theoretical topics will be delivered by business professionals and staff from the University. There will be a number of case studies which will involve entrepreneurs giving a talk about their work, how they develop products for the market, and how they market these. We are hoping that their enthusiasm will ignite the class and provide a unique view of the business world.

Credit Rating

There are 15 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

Week 
1  
2  
3  
4 Introduction to module; Project Management Session 1 
5 Project Management Session 2
6 Project Management Session 3
7 Intellectual Property
8 Guest Lectures
9 Project Management Session 4
10 Project Work
11 Project Presentations
12 Revision Week

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.
TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Market Report and Presentation 4 12 60 50

Reading List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Careers

BSc (Hons) Applied Computing is accredited by the British Computer Society, the Chartered Institute for IT professionals in the UK and abroad.

Our students are highly employable:

  • They develop the expertise that employers want from computing graduates - our Industrial Advisory Board includes experts from a range of industries including Amazon, Scottish Enterprise Tayside, NCR, Chevron and Microsoft.
  • Many modules contain industrial case studies or projects where you can solve problems that our industrial partners are facing at that time.
  • They can gain work placement experience for degree credit - if you want, take a work placement in the summer vacation between Level 3 and Level 4 - it gives you valuable 'real world' work experience and a good insight into working in the computing industry. Recent work placements have been with Microsoft, NHS, Avian, Yahoo!, NCR and Cohort Studios.
  • They are prepared for a wide range of good career prospects in computing - the UK faces a massive shortage of graduates qualified to fill the 120,000 new jobs in computing and IT every year.

Boris Borisov, BSc Applied Computing, Intelligent Point of Sale Ltd

“I work for Intelligent Point of Sale Ltd, who develop point of sale solutions for iPads. I am in charge of all the server side aspects of developing our software. My studies prepared me really well for the job I am doing now. The course allowed me to develop specific knowledge in areas that have become really handy. I’m really happy that I chose Dundee and I’d recommend it to anyone who is considering studying at the University.”

Lyuben Todorov, BSc Applied Computing, Big Data Developer

“I am a big data developer. I work with Cassandra and other leading-edge technologies. My day-to-day involves working with extremely large systems. There was a very specific course on big data which I studied in my final year. The course gave me a great insight into what industry is looking for and what the next hot technology will be. They just knew the way software development would turn. They saw a pattern which pointed towards big data. Everyone uses big data now.”

The fees you pay will depend on your fee status. Your fee status is determined by us using the information you provide on your application.

 Find out more about fee status

Fees for students starting 2018-19

Fee categoryFees for students starting 2018-19
Scottish and EU students £1,820 per year of study (for Sept 2017 entry). Fees for September 2018 will be confirmed by the Scottish Government in early 2018.
Rest of UK students £9,250 per year of study. See our scholarships for rest of UK applicants.
Overseas students (non-EU) £19,950 per year of study. See our scholarships for international applicants.

Scottish and EU students can apply to the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) to have tuition fees paid by the Scottish Government.

Rest of the UK students can apply for financial assistance, including a loan to cover the full cost of the tuition fees, from the Student Loans Company.

Tuition fees for Overseas (non-EU) students are guaranteed not to increase by more than 3% per year, for the length of your course.


Unistats data set (formerly the Key Information Set (KIS) Unistats data set - formerly the Key Information Set (KIS)

  Degree UCAS Code Unistats Data
Apply NowApplied Computing: Human Computer Interaction BScI140