• For Entry: September | January
  • Duration: 12 months
  • School: Social Sciences
  • Study Mode: Full Time+Part Time

This course examines sustainability, one of the defining issues of the 21st century. You will learn about the principles of sustainability, its impact and success in policy application at international, national and local levels.

TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework

You will examine the relationship between energy, environment and climate change and how they relate to sustainability throughout all sectors in society.

You will develop your ability to analyse, evaluate and critically review theory and policy debates relating to sustainability and to draw on international perspectives and examples of best practice in relation to methods of evaluation and assessment of sustainability. You will design and plan interventions for creating change to promote greater sustainability across different scales, and design and undertake a dissertation to address significant areas of theory and/or practice.

This course is an excellent opportunity for students from all backgrounds to convert to a degree which fosters wider, more holistic skills, while also using previous skills and knowledge to work with colleagues from diverse backgrounds, nationalities and cultures to develop skills in interdisciplinary thinking and practice.

Along with the flagship MSc in Sustainability, there are three specialised pathways: 

  • MSc in Sustainability and Water Security
  • MSc in Sustainability and the Transition to a Low Carbon Economy
  • MSc in Sustainability: Climate Change and the Green Economy

Who should study this course?

  • this course is suitable for a wide range of graduates from environmental backgrounds (e.g. geography, planning, environmental studies, natural sciences, law and political science) looking to upskill and achieve a deeper understanding of sustainability and the transformational change in society
  • you will have access to a wide range of modules in energy, environment and social transformation from across the School of Social Sciences and beyond
  • you will be assigned an individual supervisor for your dissertation and taught by an internationally renowned faculty based on campus
  • you will attend guest lectures delivered by high level speakers from international organisations. These sessions provide excellent opportunities to become connected with industry

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF)

The University of Dundee has been given a Gold award – the highest possible rating – in the 2017 Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF).

Read more about the Teaching Excellence Framework

TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework

How you will be taught

The MSc programme uses a range of teaching and learning methods, including lectures, student-led presentations, individual study and group work, role-play exercises, simulations, internships and talks by invited speakers. As is appropriate at postgraduate level, independent study plays a major role in student engagement with the programme.

How you will be assessed

  • assessment follows a variety of styles including individual essays and practical assignments along with formal written examinations, to group exercises and peer group assessment
  • the dissertation is an excellent opportunity for you to achieve deep insight into a topic of your own choice. Masters level dissertations can be very diverse, and include formal hypothesis-led research projects; theory or literature-based projects; case-study assessment and advanced professional practice evaluations.  Your choice of dissertation is negotiated between you and your academic supervisor
  • in terms of overall assessment the 180 credits for the MSc comprises 140 credits obtained from modules (7 x 20 credit modules) and 40 credits for the dissertation

What you will study

Each of the four MSc pathways contains a common core comprising the following compulsory modules:

  • CP50003 Dissertation
  • CP51044 Just Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy
  • CP52075 Principles of Sustainability
  • GE51011 Research Training and Project Planning

Each named pathway then comprises a specialised core and optional list of modules drawn from a wide list of electives:

Core Modules

Credits: 40

Overview

The dissertation contributes to the achievement of the aims of the Masters degree namely:- to promote a deeper and critical understanding of selected areas relating to the specialisation of the student; to develop originality of thought and skills of research, analysis, argumentation and expression; to build upon, develop and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired in the taught modules.

A dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a topic approved by an academic supervisor.

The aim of the module is to develop a critical understanding of objectives and implementation of the law and policy  countries will need to create towards guaranteeing a just transition to a low-carbon economy.

The aim of this module is to ground students in the principles of sustainability and sustainable development, to explore the linkages between theory and practice, and examine how more sustainable futures can be achieved in practice.

The educational aims are to provide an overview of sustainability principles within an international context – including key theories, concepts and appreciation of the contested nature of discourses in this area; develop critical interdisciplinary skills enabling linkages to be made across disciplinary boundaries and professional sectors and to emphasise the cross-cutting nature of sustainability issues and develop skills to examine how individuals and society move towards more sustainable practices.

The aim of this module is to build and develop key practical skills relating to planning, undertaking and communicating research, with specific training in effective project planning at the masters level.  Specific and generic skills acquired during the module will assist you in successfully completing other taught modules and their individual project in semester 3.

MSc Sustainability

MSc Sustainability - optional modules

Optional modules from within the following disciplines:

CEPMLP

Credits:20

Overview

The main objective of the course is to provide an introduction to the fundamental concepts and specific legal and jurisdictional issues in the field of international and transboundary natural resources.

The emphasis is on ensuring a proper understanding of the existing legal mechanisms and international regimes applicable to various types of natural resources located beyond States’ jurisdiction or control.

Module leader

Dr Sergei Vinogradov

The aim of the module is to provide students with a critical understanding of the objectives and implementation of the law and policy around sustainability for the mining sector. The student will master how the mining sector contributes to global supply chains and their effect on international commerce.

Credits:20

Overview

The main objective of this course is to help the students to understand the int’l environments and of the interaction between international relations (IR) and energy and natural resources industry. This module, together with International Political Economy, is being introduced in order to provide an important political element to the MBA, LLM and MSc Programmes in general, and to form an important part of the specification of Geopolitics of Energy in particular.

Module leader

Dr Janet Xuanli Liao

Credits:20

Overview

The objective of the module is to enhance students" understanding of the interplay of climate change politics at the international and domestic levels. Employing the Two-Levels game theory as an analytical framework, the module, on the one hand, attempts to reveal the power struggles between the major powers under the Kyoto Protocol, together with the flawed Kyoto system. On the other hand, it looks into domestic factors of the major CO2 emitters, in order to explain the difficult choices facing their leaderships, and the complexity involved in climate change governance.

Module leader

Dr Janet Xuanli Liao

Geography

This module aims to introduce students to key sources of secondary socio-economic data in the UK; to develop students’ abilities and confidence in using core methods for analysis quantitative social data; to introduce students to the use of Statistical Package for Social Scientists (SPSS); to introduce students to the analysis of social statistics; to introduce students to questionnaire and survey design and to develop students’ understanding of regression techniques.

This module aims to prepare students for undertaking qualitative research; to provide students with an advanced level of knowledge of a range of analytic qualitative research methods; to enable students to assess the appropriateness of different qualitative methods for their own research projects and to develop the skills to design and conduct qualitative research of their own.

This module aims to critically examine the application of academic knowledge to real world settings; to consider different approaches to putting their learning into practice and to select the most appropriate solution to their placement task; to reflect on the process of applying knowledge/ research skills to real world settings; to engage with a research problem as identified by the placement host and contribute to its resolution; to employ a range of skills for the effective communication of the project to both academic and real world audiences in a professional format.

Law

Environmental Regulation

Aims

To provide an overview of the main concepts and legal mechanisms used in regulating human impact on the environment.

Examples of content

  • introduction and regulation
  • liability
  • licensing
  • enforcement
  • market mechanisms
  • integration and environmental governance
  • overview

SCQF credits

20

The aim of this module is to examine the treatment of foreign investments in public international law, with particular attention to the energy market, and to examine the interplay between international investment law, sustainable development and human rights.

Examples of content:

  • Origins, history and nature of international investment law
  • Sources of international investment law
  • Traditional and new models of bilateral investment treaties, and regional investment treaties
  • Investment contracts
  • Key legal obligations of the host State and of the foreign investor
  • Introduction to investor-state dispute settlement mechanisms
  • International investment law and energy law
  • International investment law, sustainable development and human rights

The aim of the module is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the international legal framework on climate change.

Examples of content:

  • Community interests and common concerns of humankind: the development of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol
  • Protecting the climate through international law: the Paris Agreement
  • The Vienna Convention on the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer
  • Multiple reduction pathways, carbon technologies and the carbon market
  • Human Rights Instruments to protect the right to a healthy environment
  • The role of scientific evidence and climate modelling in climate litigation

Urban Planning

This module aims to develop your understanding of the policy context and competence in the application of instruments of assessment within UK/Scottish spatial planning context.

You will acquire a critical understanding of the legislative obligations imposed on public policy makers with respect to environmental assessment, with a particular focus on Environmental Impact Assessment and Strategic Environmental Assessment.

This is intended to lead to a critical understanding of how such tools are applied and their use in shaping development proposals, policies, plans and programmes.

Msc in Sustainability and Water Security

Additional Compulsory Core Module:

Legal Frameworks for Water Resource Management

Aims

The aim of this module is to develop a critical understanding of the fundamental legal principles that govern the management of national freshwaters and the factors that influence their application.

Examples of content

  • relevance of fresh water management to global policy agendas, and the role of law.
  • examination of demands made on governance of water resources management by global change.
  • water use rights allocation mechanisms with respect to surface and ground waters around the world.
  • management of pollution control with respect to surface and ground waters from point and diffuse sources.
  • legal aspects of flood management, including disaster response, land use management, interface with broader water management issues, and institutional issues.
  • key factors influencing effectiveness of legal frameworks relating to freshwater and dependent ecosystems.
  • use of case studies.

SCQF credits

20 creditds

Optional Modules from within the following disciplines:

CEPMLP

The aim of the module is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the policy and legal problems of renewable energy sources (RES) and technologies, including scientific background, investment and regulation, and integration into the electricity grid and legal underpinnings at the international, European and domestic level. It aims at providing the necessary knowledge and skills to address these problems and hence climate change effectively and timely.

Credits:20

Overview

The objective of the module is to enhance students" understanding of the interplay of climate change politics at the international and domestic levels. Employing the Two-Levels game theory as an analytical framework, the module, on the one hand, attempts to reveal the power struggles between the major powers under the Kyoto Protocol, together with the flawed Kyoto system. On the other hand, it looks into domestic factors of the major CO2 emitters, in order to explain the difficult choices facing their leaderships, and the complexity involved in climate change governance.

Module leader

Dr Janet Xuanli Liao

Geography

This module aims to introduce students to key sources of secondary socio-economic data in the UK; to develop students’ abilities and confidence in using core methods for analysis quantitative social data; to introduce students to the use of Statistical Package for Social Scientists (SPSS); to introduce students to the analysis of social statistics; to introduce students to questionnaire and survey design and to develop students’ understanding of regression techniques.

This module aims to prepare students for undertaking qualitative research; to provide students with an advanced level of knowledge of a range of analytic qualitative research methods; to enable students to assess the appropriateness of different qualitative methods for their own research projects and to develop the skills to design and conduct qualitative research of their own.

This module aims to critically examine the application of academic knowledge to real world settings; to consider different approaches to putting their learning into practice and to select the most appropriate solution to their placement task; to reflect on the process of applying knowledge/ research skills to real world settings; to engage with a research problem as identified by the placement host and contribute to its resolution; to employ a range of skills for the effective communication of the project to both academic and real world audiences in a professional format.

Law

The aim of this module is to examine the treatment of foreign investments in public international law, with particular attention to the energy market, and to examine the interplay between international investment law, sustainable development and human rights.

Examples of content:

  • Origins, history and nature of international investment law
  • Sources of international investment law
  • Traditional and new models of bilateral investment treaties, and regional investment treaties
  • Investment contracts
  • Key legal obligations of the host State and of the foreign investor
  • Introduction to investor-state dispute settlement mechanisms
  • International investment law and energy law
  • International investment law, sustainable development and human rights

Governance and Regulation of Water Services

Aims

The aim of the module is to develop a critical understanding of the options for ownership and structure of water services, the importance of good governance and the role of economic regulation in both the public and the private sectors.

Examples of content

  • global policy agendas surrounding water resources and water services
  • broad options for ownership and structure of water services (public, private, PSP)
  • comparative legal frameworks for water services regulation
  • the role of economic regulation, its relationship to economic and social goals and models for regulation
  • regulatory frameworks for drinking water quality and service standards; waste water treatment; on-site sanitation
  • the role of governance in water services delivery
  • the human right to water

SCQF credits

20 credits

The aim of the module is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the international legal framework on climate change.

Examples of content:

  • Community interests and common concerns of humankind: the development of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol
  • Protecting the climate through international law: the Paris Agreement
  • The Vienna Convention on the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer
  • Multiple reduction pathways, carbon technologies and the carbon market
  • Human Rights Instruments to protect the right to a healthy environment
  • The role of scientific evidence and climate modelling in climate litigation

MSc in Sustainability and the Transition to a Low Carbon Economy

Additional Compulsory Core Module:

The aim of the module is to develop a critical understanding of objectives and implementation of the European Energy Union, the international underpinning, EU and domestic Law and the potential to serve as a case study beyond Europe.

Optional Modules from within the following disciplines:

CEPMLP

Credits:20

Overview

Downstream energy law and policy is concerned with the structure and regulation of gas and electricity markets. With the advent of liberalisation, most gas and electricity markets have become semi-competitive. There are regulatory structures to control entry to the market. There are rules on how the producers / generators interact with the suppliers – either bilateral markets or pools. There are rules for producers / generators which get special treatment – frequently state-owned companies and renewable generators. There are measures to control security of supply. There are measures dealing with pass through of costs – and attempts to ensure that the consumer price does not reach unacceptable levels.

The course looks at regulatory structures – the role of government; the role of the independent regulator; the role of the market operator and the transmission system operator. The course looks at the options for structuring liberalised and semi-competitive markets. It looks at measures to reduce investment risks for additional capacity. It recognises that the position of capacity short markets is different from that of markets with capacity excess – even if in the long term, both ultimately want the same thing…cheap and reliable delivery of the commodity.

Module leader

Stephen Dow

Credits: 20

Overview

The aims of the module are to introduce the economic principles relevant for the energy sector, and to provide an overview of the tools typically used in performing economic analysis on the energy sector. The intended learning outcomes of the module are an understanding of the essential concepts and frameworks central to the operation and expansion of the energy sector, their economic implications, and the basic economic tools for analysing them. The module is designed for an interdisciplinary audience. It is delivered through lectures, computer laboratory work, and virtual direction. It is assessed through class participation, a research paper, and an examination. A familiarity with microeconomics principles or numerical techniques is not required but would be helpful.

Module leader

Dr Rafael (Manny) Macatangay

The aim of the module is to provide students with a critical understanding of the objectives and implementation of the law and policy around sustainability for the mining sector. The student will master how the mining sector contributes to global supply chains and their effect on international commerce.

The aim of the module is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the policy and legal problems of renewable energy sources (RES) and technologies, including scientific background, investment and regulation, and integration into the electricity grid and legal underpinnings at the international, European and domestic level. It aims at providing the necessary knowledge and skills to address these problems and hence climate change effectively and timely.

Credits:20

Overview

The objective of the module is to enhance students" understanding of the interplay of climate change politics at the international and domestic levels. Employing the Two-Levels game theory as an analytical framework, the module, on the one hand, attempts to reveal the power struggles between the major powers under the Kyoto Protocol, together with the flawed Kyoto system. On the other hand, it looks into domestic factors of the major CO2 emitters, in order to explain the difficult choices facing their leaderships, and the complexity involved in climate change governance.

Module leader

Dr Janet Xuanli Liao

Geography

This module aims to introduce students to key sources of secondary socio-economic data in the UK; to develop students’ abilities and confidence in using core methods for analysis quantitative social data; to introduce students to the use of Statistical Package for Social Scientists (SPSS); to introduce students to the analysis of social statistics; to introduce students to questionnaire and survey design and to develop students’ understanding of regression techniques.

This module aims to prepare students for undertaking qualitative research; to provide students with an advanced level of knowledge of a range of analytic qualitative research methods; to enable students to assess the appropriateness of different qualitative methods for their own research projects and to develop the skills to design and conduct qualitative research of their own.

This module aims to critically examine the application of academic knowledge to real world settings; to consider different approaches to putting their learning into practice and to select the most appropriate solution to their placement task; to reflect on the process of applying knowledge/ research skills to real world settings; to engage with a research problem as identified by the placement host and contribute to its resolution; to employ a range of skills for the effective communication of the project to both academic and real world audiences in a professional format.

Law

The aim of this module is to examine the treatment of foreign investments in public international law, with particular attention to the energy market, and to examine the interplay between international investment law, sustainable development and human rights.

Examples of content:

  • Origins, history and nature of international investment law
  • Sources of international investment law
  • Traditional and new models of bilateral investment treaties, and regional investment treaties
  • Investment contracts
  • Key legal obligations of the host State and of the foreign investor
  • Introduction to investor-state dispute settlement mechanisms
  • International investment law and energy law
  • International investment law, sustainable development and human rights

The aim of the module is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the international legal framework on climate change.

Examples of content:

  • Community interests and common concerns of humankind: the development of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol
  • Protecting the climate through international law: the Paris Agreement
  • The Vienna Convention on the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer
  • Multiple reduction pathways, carbon technologies and the carbon market
  • Human Rights Instruments to protect the right to a healthy environment
  • The role of scientific evidence and climate modelling in climate litigation

Engineering

The primary aim of this module is to introduce students to relevant professionals both in academia and the external environment who have expertise in one or more areas of the energy environment, or related fields.
Students will be exposed to the energy landscape through a mixture of lectures and study visits, and this will provide a solid foundation for future studies in energy and sustainability fields.
The focus will be providing a broad understanding of some of the key drivers and technologies, emphasising synergies and holistic approaches rather than engineering detail.

Urban Planning

This module aims to develop your understanding of the policy context and competence in the application of instruments of assessment within UK/Scottish spatial planning context.

You will acquire a critical understanding of the legislative obligations imposed on public policy makers with respect to environmental assessment, with a particular focus on Environmental Impact Assessment and Strategic Environmental Assessment.

This is intended to lead to a critical understanding of how such tools are applied and their use in shaping development proposals, policies, plans and programmes.

This module aims to discuss sustainable development in its wider theoretical, political and regulatory context, and to use this understanding to examine how actors use a range of strategies to promote the sustainability of our cities and regions. 

It also aims to engage with the question of how and whether the growth of cities is compatible to the achievement of sustainable development goals.  Lastly, the module aims to develop a comparative understanding of the challenges for city management and governance practices across the globe as regards the sustainable provision of infrastructure and future land uses.

MSc in Sustainability: Climate Change and the Green Economy

Additional Compulsory Core Module:

The aim of the module is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the international legal framework on climate change.

Examples of content:

  • Community interests and common concerns of humankind: the development of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol
  • Protecting the climate through international law: the Paris Agreement
  • The Vienna Convention on the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer
  • Multiple reduction pathways, carbon technologies and the carbon market
  • Human Rights Instruments to protect the right to a healthy environment
  • The role of scientific evidence and climate modelling in climate litigation

Optional Modules from within the following disciplines:

CEPMLP

Credits: 20

Overview

The aims of the module are to introduce the economic principles relevant for the energy sector, and to provide an overview of the tools typically used in performing economic analysis on the energy sector. The intended learning outcomes of the module are an understanding of the essential concepts and frameworks central to the operation and expansion of the energy sector, their economic implications, and the basic economic tools for analysing them. The module is designed for an interdisciplinary audience. It is delivered through lectures, computer laboratory work, and virtual direction. It is assessed through class participation, a research paper, and an examination. A familiarity with microeconomics principles or numerical techniques is not required but would be helpful.

Module leader

Dr Rafael (Manny) Macatangay

The aim of the module is to develop a critical understanding of objectives and implementation of the European Energy Union, the international underpinning, EU and domestic Law and the potential to serve as a case study beyond Europe.

The aim of the module is to develop a critical understanding of objectives and implementation of the law and policy that is based on energy and climate science. The student will master the different legal actions of government to ensure it meets its climate targets.

The aim of the module is to provide students with a critical understanding of the objectives and implementation of the law and policy around sustainability for the mining sector. The student will master how the mining sector contributes to global supply chains and their effect on international commerce.

The aim of the module is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the policy and legal problems of renewable energy sources (RES) and technologies, including scientific background, investment and regulation, and integration into the electricity grid and legal underpinnings at the international, European and domestic level. It aims at providing the necessary knowledge and skills to address these problems and hence climate change effectively and timely.

Credits: 20

Overview

The aims of the module are to introduce the economic principles relevant for the energy sector, and to highlight some of the most challenging economic issues facing the global energy complex. The intended learning outcome of the module is an understanding of how economic analysis informs the national and international debates on energy sector issues, and how economics research affects energy sector decisions made by industry or government. The module is designed for an interdisciplinary audience. It is delivered through lectures and virtual direction. It is assessed through class participation, a research paper, and an examination. A familiarity with microeconomics principles or numerical techniques is not required but would be helpful.

Module leader

Dr Rafael (Manny) Macatangay

Credits:20

Overview

The main objective of this course is to help the students to understand the int’l environments and of the interaction between international relations (IR) and energy and natural resources industry. This module, together with International Political Economy, is being introduced in order to provide an important political element to the MBA, LLM and MSc Programmes in general, and to form an important part of the specification of Geopolitics of Energy in particular.

Module leader

Dr Janet Xuanli Liao

Credits:20

Overview

The objective of the module is to enhance students" understanding of the interplay of climate change politics at the international and domestic levels. Employing the Two-Levels game theory as an analytical framework, the module, on the one hand, attempts to reveal the power struggles between the major powers under the Kyoto Protocol, together with the flawed Kyoto system. On the other hand, it looks into domestic factors of the major CO2 emitters, in order to explain the difficult choices facing their leaderships, and the complexity involved in climate change governance.

Module leader

Dr Janet Xuanli Liao

Geography

This module aims to introduce students to key sources of secondary socio-economic data in the UK; to develop students’ abilities and confidence in using core methods for analysis quantitative social data; to introduce students to the use of Statistical Package for Social Scientists (SPSS); to introduce students to the analysis of social statistics; to introduce students to questionnaire and survey design and to develop students’ understanding of regression techniques.

This module aims to prepare students for undertaking qualitative research; to provide students with an advanced level of knowledge of a range of analytic qualitative research methods; to enable students to assess the appropriateness of different qualitative methods for their own research projects and to develop the skills to design and conduct qualitative research of their own.

This module aims to critically examine the application of academic knowledge to real world settings; to consider different approaches to putting their learning into practice and to select the most appropriate solution to their placement task; to reflect on the process of applying knowledge/ research skills to real world settings; to engage with a research problem as identified by the placement host and contribute to its resolution; to employ a range of skills for the effective communication of the project to both academic and real world audiences in a professional format.

Law

The aim of this module is to examine the treatment of foreign investments in public international law, with particular attention to the energy market, and to examine the interplay between international investment law, sustainable development and human rights.

Examples of content:

  • Origins, history and nature of international investment law
  • Sources of international investment law
  • Traditional and new models of bilateral investment treaties, and regional investment treaties
  • Investment contracts
  • Key legal obligations of the host State and of the foreign investor
  • Introduction to investor-state dispute settlement mechanisms
  • International investment law and energy law
  • International investment law, sustainable development and human rights

As societies move to become more sustainable and develop low-carbon economies, our MSc in Sustainability will place you in the fast growing area of energy, environment, society and governance (EESG) sections of firms.

An MSc in Sustainability will equip you with the necessary skills and knowledge to take up a wide range of careers in policy, practical management, training and research across a spectrum of organisations, from local, national to international and within the public and private sectors in the EESG areas.

I picked this course because it’s the only one of its kind in Scotland - its broader focus allowed me to take classes in environmental architecture, planning, politics and research methods. The best part was my work placement, which improved my employment prospects and allowed me to conduct research in a professional setting.

Rory Angus
Graduate, Scotland

A good 4-year degree, equivalent to a UK Honours degree, preferably at upper 2nd class level or above. Candidates holding the equivalent of a good 2nd class lower degree may also apply. Preferred degree disciplines: Law, Geography, Environmental Science/Studies, Planning, Engineering, Business Studies or other appropriate discipline.

 EU and International qualifications


English Language Requirement

IELTS Overall 6.5
Listening 6.0
Reading 6.0
Writing 6.0
Speaking 6.0

 Equivalent grades from other test providers

 

English Language Programmes

We offer Pre-Sessional and Foundation Programme(s) throughout the year. These are designed to prepare you for university study in the UK when you have not yet met the language requirements for direct entry onto a degree programme.

 Discover our English Language Programmes

The fees you pay will depend on your fee status. Your fee status is determined by us using the information you provide on your application.

 Find out more about fee status

Fee statusFees for students starting academic year 2019-20
Scottish and EU students £7,300 per year of study
See our scholarships for UK/EU applicants
Rest of UK students £7,300 per year of study
See our scholarships for UK/EU applicants
Overseas students (non-EU) £17,275 per year of study
See our scholarships for International applicants

Additional costs

You may incur additional costs in the course of your education at the University over and above tuition fees in an academic year.

Examples of additional costs:

One off costOngoing costIncidental cost
Graduation feeStudio feeField trips

*these are examples only and are not exhaustive.

Additional costs:

  • may be mandatory or optional expenses
  • may be one off, ongoing or incidental charges and certain costs may be payable annually for each year of your programme of study
  • vary depending on your programme of study
  • are payable by you and are non-refundable and non-transferable

Unfortunately, failure to pay additional costs may result in limitations on your student experience.

For additional costs specific to your course please speak to our Enquiry Team.

You apply for this course via the UCAS Postgraduate website which is free of charge. You can check the progress of your application online and you can also make multiple applications.

You'll need to upload relevant documents as part of your application. Please read the how to apply page before you apply to find out about what you'll need.

  Degree Course code
Apply nowSustainability MScP052223
Apply nowSustainability and Water Security MScP052223
Apply nowSustainability and the Transition to a Low Carbon Economy MScP052223
Apply nowSustainability: Climate Change and the Green Economy MScP052223

Course Contact

Professor Volker Roeben
Social Sciences
sustainability@dundee.ac.uk
+44 (0) 1382 386984

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