• For Entry: September | January
  • Duration: 12 months
  • School: Social Sciences
  • Study Mode: Full Time

Do some crimes cry out to be prosecuted trans-nationally? Can human rights make the world a better place? Or is there no hope of criminal justice ever operating effectively at the international level, or of human rights rhetoric leading to real improvements in the way governments treat their people? Whatever your views, if these questions resonate with you, this LLM programme is for you.

TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework

Do some crimes cry out to be prosecuted trans-nationally? Can human rights make the world a better place? Or is there no hope of criminal justice ever operating effectively at the international level, or of human rights rhetoric leading to real improvements in the way governments treat their people? Whatever your views, if these questions resonate with you, this LLM programme is for you.

Whether you are passionate about international criminal justice and human rights or sceptical about them, this programme will ensure that you are fully informed on the underlying issues and can debate them at a sophisticated level with others – including some who may not necessarily share your point of view. International criminal justice and human rights go together, and this programme offers students the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of both these interconnected areas of law. The international criminal justice side of the programme aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the key contemporary issues in the field. Organised crime, terrorist activity and regional civil wars transcend national boundaries, impacting far beyond the interests of individual nation states. The effective detection, investigation and prosecution of crime is increasingly dependent on closer harmonisation and co-operation among global institutions. So also, the human rights dimension of the programme seeks to develop students’ understanding of the main global systems for the protection of human rights, as well as their appreciation of the main arguments for and against the universality of human rights, in concept and in practice. This is a programme both for those interested in the practicalities of criminal justice and human rights at international level and for those seeking to develop an academic expertise in these areas as part of a career in teaching and/or research.

At Dundee you will have close contact with staff members experienced in and dedicated to their subject. You will have the opportunity in small seminar groups for real engagement with their ideas and the ideas of your fellow students as you develop and articulate your own thinking on international criminal justice and human rights.

Dundee Law School

Dundee Law School is widely recognised as an excellent place to study.  Both the Guardian and Times 2017 league tables placed Dundee as the top Law School in Scotland and in the top 10 in the UK, building on particularly strong results in the National Student Survey, which has repeatedly ranked Dundee as first in Scotland.  Over the last two national reviews of research, Dundee is the only institution in the UK to have had all of its submissions rated as “internationally excellent” or “world-leading”. 

Our commitment is to provide high-quality instruction, with a focus on practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful career, at home or abroad.  We offer an induction programme at the start of each semester, to ensure that new students have the necessary understanding of the UK and European legal systems and of what is required of them in a study environment seeking to develop independent learning

We seek to integrate LLM students into the life of the School, with invitations to guest lectures and seminars.  We also have an annual reading party in a beautiful country house, where you are joined by staff to work on academic skills and relax with fellow students.

 For further information see the Dundee Law School webpages.

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF)

The University of Dundee has been given a Gold award – the highest possible rating – in the 2017 Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF).

Read more about the Teaching Excellence Framework

TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework

How you will be taught

You will be taught through a mix of lectures, seminar discussions and tutorials, with an emphasis on seminars that build on reading done on the basis of the specific reading lists provided.

What you will study

You will take three modules in each semester, plus Legal Research Skills (taught in two blocks at the start of each semester) and will present a Dissertation (written over the summer).

Not every module will be available in every year, depending on staff availability and student demand.

 

International Criminal Justice

Module Convenor: Jacques Hartmann (j.hartmann@dundee.ac.uk, Room 3.20)

International criminal law (the core crimes of which are genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity) has developed considerably since efforts to hold individuals to account following World War I and II. This module aims to give students an advanced knowledge and understanding of key issues relating to international criminal justice. In doing so, the module examines the progress of the law and institutions in this field and critically assesses the body of law that has emerged from the work of international tribunals, focusing on the International Criminal Court. The module further focuses on the problems related to bringing alleged international criminals to justice.

The Module consists of an introductory lecture, 5 substantive seminars, and a revision class (7 class meetings).

There will be one piece of assessed work in the form of an exam held during the December exam diet.  This will be a two-hour unseen exam, with the default format being requiring students to answer 2 questions from a choice of 4. There will also be one formative assessment during the semester.

Transnational Crime and Counter Terrorism

Module Convenors: Dr Jacques Hartmann (j.hartmann@dundee.ac.uk) Room 3.20.

The suppression of cross-border criminal activity has become a major global concern. This module aims to give students an advanced knowledge and understanding of key issues relating to how states, acting together, are responding to transnational crime and international terrorism through a combination of international treaty obligations and national criminal laws. The modules examines multilateral ‘suppression conventions’ that oblige states parties to criminalise a broad range of activities, including drug trafficking, terrorism and transnational organised crime. The module also examines different types of international procedural cooperation, like extradition and mutual legal assistance that have been used in the suppression conventions.

The Module consists of an introductory lecture, 5 substantive seminars, and a revision class (7 class meetings). There will be one piece of assessed work in the form of a 4,000 word essay to be submitted after the teaching semester. The submission date will be in the first weeks of the exam diet. There will in addition be one piece of formative work, in the form of an essay of 1,500 words completed early in the semester.

UN Human Rights Law

Module Convenors: Professor Robin Churchill

The module aims to introduce students to the extensive law, institutions and procedures for the promotion and protection of human rights developed by the United Nations. It examines the work of various UN bodies, particularly the Human Rights Council, the High Commissioner for Human Rights, and the various committees of independent experts that have been set to monitor compliance with the principal human rights treaties. In addition, a number of specific rights will be analysed in detail, including the right to freedom from torture, the right to adequate housing, the rights of women and children, and equality and non-discrimination.

 

Module Reading List

Regional Human Rights Systems

Module Convenors: Professor Robin Churchill

This module aims to introduce students to the three principal regional systems for the protection of human rights (in Africa, the Americas and Europe). The module will explain why regional systems for the promotion and protection of human rights have been developed in addition to the global UN system, and explore the similarities and differences between those three systems. The various mechanisms for the enforcement of rights will be examined and their effectiveness assessed. The content of selected rights will analysed in detail.

Global Human Rights

Module Convenor: Dr Oche Onazi (o.onazi@dundee.ac.uk)

This is a Semester 2 module. The method of assessment is 100% by coursework (two pieces, the first being a 1500 word comprehension/opinion practice essay and the second a 4000 word essay).

The module seeks to promote students' understanding of the concept of human rights by considering the issue of the universality of human rights in the light of differing cultural traditions from across the globe. On the face of it the idea that human rights are universal seems straightforward, with an internationally agreed articulation of rights set out in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948 and developed in subsequent international covenants. On examination, however, it is clear that human rights may be conceived of and expressed in many different ways, some influenced by different cultural traditions, others reflecting different understandings of the practical value of the idea of human rights. The module seeks to explore a range of different articulations of human rights, considering both the instruments – international, regional and national – in which they have been formally expressed, and the cultural traditions and human inspirations which underlie their formal expression. The early seminars consider the idea of human rights as a characteristically Western concept, which has found practical expression in particular in the Bill of Rights of the USA, the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen and the International Bill of Rights, while subsequent seminars examine the concept from the differing perspectives of writers from the African continent, from the Islamic tradition, and from Asia (in particular India), matching these theoretical perspectives with corresponding articulations of human rights in regional and national instruments. It is the overall aim of the module to stimulate thought and discussion on the practical contribution of the human rights concept to the raising of human rights standards worldwide.

The module will be taught by means of five two-hour seminars, for which students will be expected to undertake extensive preparation. There will be an additional introductory seminar and an additional concluding seminar for the purposes of consolidation and exam revision.

How you will be assessed

You will be assessed through a combination of exams and essays. The courses taught by Law share a common pattern; those in the autumn semester are assessed by exam and those in the second semester by essays. In each case you will be given a chance to practice this style of assessment and given feedback on your performance before the formal assessment.

This pattern ensures that you will gain experience of different styles of assessment, testing both breadth and depth of knowledge and developing writing skills in advance of tackling the Dissertation. The Dissertation is assessed wholly on the basis of the final text that is submitted and Legal Research Skills by a combination of a short essay and a presentation.

Compulsory modules

LW50107 - Masters Dissertation

All students write a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a subject of their choice within the scope of their chosen programme, giving the opportunity for a deeper and more critical examination of a specific topic.  Advice and assistance are given on selecting the topic and on undertaking research and writing, and you will have a member of staff as your supervisor to provide further guidance.  The dissertation is written over the summer, whether you have started the programme in September or January.

Legal Research Skills (LW50108)

The aim of this module is to introduce you to the key elements of legal research and writing, supporting the acquisition of the (transferable) skills necessary to succeed in the LLM and beyond and in particular providing a sound basis for progress to the dissertation element of the Masters degree.

International Criminal Justice

Module Convenor: Jacques Hartmann (j.hartmann@dundee.ac.uk, Room 3.20)

International criminal law (the core crimes of which are genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity) has developed considerably since efforts to hold individuals to account following World War I and II. This module aims to give students an advanced knowledge and understanding of key issues relating to international criminal justice. In doing so, the module examines the progress of the law and institutions in this field and critically assesses the body of law that has emerged from the work of international tribunals, focusing on the International Criminal Court. The module further focuses on the problems related to bringing alleged international criminals to justice.

The Module consists of an introductory lecture, 5 substantive seminars, and a revision class (7 class meetings).

There will be one piece of assessed work in the form of an exam held during the December exam diet.  This will be a two-hour unseen exam, with the default format being requiring students to answer 2 questions from a choice of 4. There will also be one formative assessment during the semester.

Transnational Crime and Counter Terrorism

Module Convenors: Dr Jacques Hartmann (j.hartmann@dundee.ac.uk) Room 3.20.

The suppression of cross-border criminal activity has become a major global concern. This module aims to give students an advanced knowledge and understanding of key issues relating to how states, acting together, are responding to transnational crime and international terrorism through a combination of international treaty obligations and national criminal laws. The modules examines multilateral ‘suppression conventions’ that oblige states parties to criminalise a broad range of activities, including drug trafficking, terrorism and transnational organised crime. The module also examines different types of international procedural cooperation, like extradition and mutual legal assistance that have been used in the suppression conventions.

The Module consists of an introductory lecture, 5 substantive seminars, and a revision class (7 class meetings). There will be one piece of assessed work in the form of a 4,000 word essay to be submitted after the teaching semester. The submission date will be in the first weeks of the exam diet. There will in addition be one piece of formative work, in the form of an essay of 1,500 words completed early in the semester.

Global Human Rights

Module Convenor: Dr Oche Onazi (o.onazi@dundee.ac.uk)

This is a Semester 2 module. The method of assessment is 100% by coursework (two pieces, the first being a 1500 word comprehension/opinion practice essay and the second a 4000 word essay).

The module seeks to promote students' understanding of the concept of human rights by considering the issue of the universality of human rights in the light of differing cultural traditions from across the globe. On the face of it the idea that human rights are universal seems straightforward, with an internationally agreed articulation of rights set out in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948 and developed in subsequent international covenants. On examination, however, it is clear that human rights may be conceived of and expressed in many different ways, some influenced by different cultural traditions, others reflecting different understandings of the practical value of the idea of human rights. The module seeks to explore a range of different articulations of human rights, considering both the instruments – international, regional and national – in which they have been formally expressed, and the cultural traditions and human inspirations which underlie their formal expression. The early seminars consider the idea of human rights as a characteristically Western concept, which has found practical expression in particular in the Bill of Rights of the USA, the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen and the International Bill of Rights, while subsequent seminars examine the concept from the differing perspectives of writers from the African continent, from the Islamic tradition, and from Asia (in particular India), matching these theoretical perspectives with corresponding articulations of human rights in regional and national instruments. It is the overall aim of the module to stimulate thought and discussion on the practical contribution of the human rights concept to the raising of human rights standards worldwide.

The module will be taught by means of five two-hour seminars, for which students will be expected to undertake extensive preparation. There will be an additional introductory seminar and an additional concluding seminar for the purposes of consolidation and exam revision.

UN Human Rights Law

Module Convenors: Professor Robin Churchill

The module aims to introduce students to the extensive law, institutions and procedures for the promotion and protection of human rights developed by the United Nations. It examines the work of various UN bodies, particularly the Human Rights Council, the High Commissioner for Human Rights, and the various committees of independent experts that have been set to monitor compliance with the principal human rights treaties. In addition, a number of specific rights will be analysed in detail, including the right to freedom from torture, the right to adequate housing, the rights of women and children, and equality and non-discrimination.

 

Module Reading List

Optional modules (as approved by Adviser of Studies)

Credit rating: 20

The main objective of the module is to provide an understanding of the main law and policy issues in the international petroleum industry, with an emphasis upon transactional agreements concluded between host government and oil company/investors.

Common and diverging objectives between the two parties and indeed among the international corporate and financial investors themselves are faced in a candid and practical way, with an emphasis upon ways of accommodating the interests of diverse stakeholders in the development of petroleum resources.

A brief introduction is provided to petroleum taxation issues. The module focuses upon problem-solving techniques in a variety of settings, noting the inputs of lawyers, economists, accountants, engineers and geologists.

Credit rating: 20

The main objective of the course is to provide an introduction to the fundamental concepts and specific legal and jurisdictional issues in the field of international and transboundary natural resources.

The emphasis is on ensuring a proper understanding of the existing legal mechanisms and international regimes applicable to various types of natural resources located beyond States’ jurisdiction or control.

Credit rating: 20

The module aims to provide an understanding of the regulatory and contractual mechanisms required to make a single jurisdiction work in relation to petroleum law. The emphasis is on providing the student with knowledge and understanding of the differences (and similarities) between regimes based on licences, and those based on production sharing contracts.

All oil and gas law throughout the world is the same at a basic level – international law determines which state is entitled to the resource; the entitled state grants rights to individuals to extract the resource; the individuals agree amongst themselves as to how to split the costs and benefits; there is unitisation if necessary; the production is taxed; pipelines etc are built to move the production; the production is sold; and the facilities are ultimately decommissioned. This module aims to show the different models states adopt to facilitate petroleum production, including showing the role for state companies.

Credit rating: 20

The course deals with selected issues central to understanding international and national environmental policy and law related to production and consumption of natural resources and power generation. It addresses, in particular, environmental problems arising in connection with production and transportation of petroleum (both on-land and offshore), mining activities, use of nuclear energy, including production of uranium and disposal of radioactive wastes, and use of fossil fuels, including transboundary air pollution and global climate effects. A special emphasis is placed on the solutions for environmental problems provided by various national regulatory systems, in particular British and North American.

Credit rating: 20

Project financing is a tool, not an outcome in itself. This course recognises that energy projects are frequently financed by lenders. Where the lenders are content to accept repayment solely from the revenues of that project – not from the wider revenues of the sponsor – there is a limitation of recourse (or at the extreme an absence of recourse). That is project financing. The course looks at how various types of energy project can be structured to achieve that goal. The bank is not an equity risk taker – its business is to take credit risks. Project finance will force the bank to take a degree of project risk, so the bank will demand a contractual structure which mitigates that risk exposure. The course is concerned with understanding the risks for various energy projects – oil development; gas development; power generators; mining projects etc – and seeing how the principle risks inherent in those projects are moved by contract to the party best able to bear the risk. The course understands that where the bank is happy with the project risk profile, it will lend. If the bank is not happy with the project risk profile, it will not lend. The course looks at the risks which can be moved and how are they moved to a party acceptable to the lender – whilst at the same time ensuring that the holder of that risk is happy with the level of payment for taking that risk.

Credit rating: 20

The main objective of this course is to help the students to understand the int’l environments and of the interaction between international relations (IR) and energy and natural resources industry. This module, together with International Political Economy, is being introduced in order to provide an important political element to the MBA, LLM and MSc Programmes in general, and to form an important part of the specification of Geopolitics of Energy in particular.

Credit rating: 20

This module will provide students with foundation knowledge on how taxes and non-tax instruments are used by governments and the extractive industry to promote natural resource development while deriving revenues for the state and profits for extractive firms. Emphasis is on providing an understanding of the complex issues of tax regimes and the skill to analysis current topics or controversies, with the objective of providing competent strategy or policy advice to either governments or resource firms. Students will be prepared to compare and evaluate alternative taxation regimes, including environmental and international tax issues. Some topics covered in the module include; resource rent taxation, royalties, direct and indirect taxes, general structure of PSAs/PSCs, transfer pricing, and current issues from around the world. This module does not teach skills in accounting, financial analysis or tax law.

Credit rating: 20

The primary objective of this course is to provide an overview of the law that governs the non-navigational uses of international watercourses. The course begins with an overview of the fundamental principles of public international law, considered in the specific context of international watercourses. At the end of the modules, students are expected to be able to identify the legal issues and possible solutions for addressing international water problems. An understanding of the basic principles of public international law is required. The programme will consist of seven 3-hour lectures, with some provision for student presentations. The assessment for the course is one research paper, maximum length 4500 words due at the end of the term.

Credit rating: 20

The primary objective of this course is to provide an overview of the fundamental legal principles that govern national freshwaters from a comparative law perspective. The course begins with an overview of legal entitlement to water and compares national legal regulatory systems. At the end of the module, students are expected to be able to identify the legal issues and possible solutions for addressing national water problems. An understanding of the basic principles of national law is required. This course will consider the principles of national water law and administration. Basic historical and current concepts of national water law will be identified and analysed. Existing systems of water law in various countries (i.e., civil law countries, common law countries, Muslim countries) will be examined and compared. The course will address the issues of ownership and legal entitlement with respect to water resources; legal regimes governing the right to use water; regulation of the beneficial uses of water resources and water quality and pollution control. Finally, such issues as water resources administration and privatisation of the water industry will be examined. The new developments in Scotland will be analysed and compared with water law revision activities in other countries (i.e. Australia, China, Kenya, Namibia and South Africa).

Credit rating: 20

The aim of the module is to develop an understanding of the options for ownership and structure of water services, the role of law and legal frameworks, the importance of good governance and the role of economic regulation in both the public and the private sectors.

Corporate Governance

Module Convenor: Professor Alice Belcher

This module will give students an understanding of corporate governance issues. The module addresses the following: distribution of power within companies; methods of regulating governance; governance systems across the world; auditors and internal control; the meaning and importance of good governance. This module will be of interest to students who wish to work in the area of corporate governance in the UK or internationally.

 

Module Reading List

Private International Law of Business Transactions

Module Convenors: Ms Aude Fiorini

This module will give students an understanding of the core issues relevant to international contractual litigation in a European and international context. This module will address both issues of jurisdiction (where cross-border contractual cases may be litigated), of choice of law (which law governs an international contract) as well as that of movement of judgments across jurisdictions (the extent to which contractual judgments may be recognised and enforced abroad).

This module will be of interest to students who wish to work in the area of international commercial litigation.

Module Reading List

Environmental Regulation

Module Convenor: Professor Andrea Ross

This is a first semester module. The aim of this module is to provide an overview of the main concepts and legal mechanisms used in regulating human impact on the environment. The modules uses examples from the UK and the students' home countries to explore the key concepts shaping environmental law; to identify different approaches and techniques for environmental regulation; to assess strengths and weaknesses of these techniques for different parties and to explore ways in which different techniques can be combined to give effect to environmental policy.

The module is delivered through seminars and independent research tasks. Students MUST prepare for class using reading from the module guide and from their own independent research. The beginning of each class will be spent running through what EACH student has read to prepare for class. This will then be used to structure the discussion in the seminar. There will be one piece of assessed work in the form of an exam held during the December exam diet.  This will be a two-hour unseen exam, with the default format being requiring students to answer 2 questions from a choice of 4. There will also be one formative practice examination during the semester.

International Family Law

Module Convenor: Professor Peter McEleavy and Aude Fiorini

This module will take advantage of the convenor's particular expertise in this area and evaluate policy issues relevant to the development of international family law harmonisation as well as the legal responses to a variety of topics of contemporary interest. The latter will include connecting factors, inter-country adoption, matrimonial and parental responsibility matters, child abduction, leave to remove applications, maintenance and matrimonial finance.

International Law & Security

Module Convenor: Jacques Hartmann (j.hartmann@dundee.ac.uk, Room 3.20)

Security and the maintenance and promotion of security are key issues in international law. The concept of security lies at the heart of many of the current international legal regimes – whether these are designed to prevent security from armed attacks by other States or armed groups, or to address threats from organised crime, or terrorist groups. Each of these issues are addressed by different aspects of international law, from the laws on the use of force and self-defence to the powers of the United Nations Security Council. This module aims to give students advanced knowledge and understanding of key issues relating to International Law and Security and to inculcate a theoretical understanding of the concept of security in international law.

The Module consists of an introductory lecture, 5 substantive seminars, and a revision class (7 class meetings).

There will be one piece of assessed work in the form of an exam held during the December exam diet.  This will be a two-hour unseen exam, with the default format being requiring students to answer 2 questions from a choice of 4. There will also be one formative assessment during the semester

Module Reading List

Private International Law (Common Law Perspectives)

Module Convenor: Ms Aude Fiorini (a.r.fiorini@dundee.ac.uk), Room 3.10.

This is a second semester module. As such this module will be assessed through essays.

The aim of this module is to give students an understanding of the core issues relevant to international commercial litigation in a common law context. By way of contrast, consideration will also be given to the differing approaches to jurisdiction in civil and commercial law matters as employed in common law and civil law legal systems. Topics covered will vary depending on current developments but may include tag jurisdiction, subject matter jurisdiction, long arm jurisdiction, the doctrines of forum non conveniens and lis alibi pendens, the use of anti-suit or freezing injunctions or the Hague Judgments.

Module Reading List

Principles of Corporate Law

Module Convenor: Dr. Bo Xie (b.xie@dundee.ac.uk) Room 3.18

This module will be offered in semester 1. The method of assessment is a two-hour written examination.

This module will examine the fundamental principles which underlie company law and corporate finance in the UK. It examines what goes on behind the corporate veil; constitutional matters; the duties and liabilities of directors; shareholders’ rights and remedies, capital structures and maintenance, raising corporate finance through debt and equity, and what to do if companies in financial difficulties. You will investigate and apply principles and rules found in these areas of corporate law to novel problems, and real-world and hypothetical scenarios.

This module will be of interest to students who wish to work in the area of UK and/or international corporate law.

Module Reading List

Banking and Financial Services Law

Module Convenor: Mr Stephen Dnes (s.m.dnes@dundee.ac.uk)

This is a second semester module.  The module aims to examine the regulation of financial services and markets in a global context, with particular reference to the financial crisis and its aftermath.

The syllabus will evolve in line with new developments. It is envisaged that the module may comprise the following elements: Introduction to banking and financial services regulation and the context in which the industry operates, including its recent history; Economic and policy issues relating to banking and financial services regulation; Main features of the regulation of financial services at the UK and EU level; Comparative analysis of approaches to regulation of financial services in other jurisdictions, such as transatlantic comparisons; Legal aspects of central banking; “Too Big to Fail,” ring fencing of investment and retail banking, and the “living wills” approach; Revisions to the Basel capital requirements and their national implementation; Legal aspects of quantitative easing; and the regulation of credit card interchange fees and merchant rules. Seminars will be geared to the development of a substantial paper to be submitted at the end of the semester; there is no exam.

Competition Law

Module Convenor: Stephen Dnes 

This is a second semester module. This module aims to introduce students to competition law and policy from an international business law perspective. Main topics will include (i) cartels and restrictive agreements; (ii) abuse of dominance / monopolization, with a particular focus on recent technology cases, and (iii) the review of mergers and acquisitions under competition laws. It thus seeks to provide a solid foundation in the competition law issues most likely to be encountered in practice, enforcement, and further legal research.

The primary focus of the course will be on the competition laws of the UK and the EU, but because of the increasingly global context of competition law practice, comparisons will also be drawn with other important jurisdictions from an international business law perspective, including China and the United States. The course will seek to explore the theoretical context of competition policy, notably related economic theory, to reflect the significant role underlying theory has come to play in shaping the development of competition law. However, no prior knowledge of economics is expected and the emphasis will be on a practical understanding of the issues from a primarily legal perspective.

Seminars will be geared to the development of a substantial paper to be submitted at the end of the semester; there is no exam.

 

Regional Human Rights Systems

Module Convenors: Professor Robin Churchill

This module aims to introduce students to the three principal regional systems for the protection of human rights (in Africa, the Americas and Europe). The module will explain why regional systems for the promotion and protection of human rights have been developed in addition to the global UN system, and explore the similarities and differences between those three systems. The various mechanisms for the enforcement of rights will be examined and their effectiveness assessed. The content of selected rights will analysed in detail.

Principles of E-Commerce Law

Module Convenor: Mr Stuart R. Cross (s.r.cross@dundee.ac.uk) Room 3.06

This module will give students an introduction to and an overview of the main concepts and legal issues associated with the law relating to E-Commerce and e-commerce transactions centred on the United Kingdom. It also considers cross border and conflict of law issues associated with such transactions.

This is a first semester module. The Module consists of an introductory seminar, 5 substantive seminars, and a revision class (7 class meetings).  There will be one piece of assessed work in the form of an exam held during the December exam diet.  This will be a two-hour unseen exam, with the default format being requiring students to answer 2 questions from a choice of 4. There will also be one formative assessment during the semester.

This module will be of interest to students who wish to work in the broad area of commercial law or specifically in the area of E-Commerce.

Module Reading List

Intellectual Property Law

Module Convenor: Professor Stuart Cross (s.r.cross@dundee.ac.uk, room: 3.06)

This is a second semester module. This module will give students an understanding of the key constituent legal regimes which comprise the general area of intellectual property law in the United Kingdom. The module focuses on the statutory and common law regimes in the United Kingdom which regulate and control copyright, patents, trademarks, and design rights. While the focus is on the United Kingdom legal regimes the module also deals with intellectual property issues in a digital environment and the significant role of the European Union in shaping and influencing intellectual property rules and principles in the United Kingdom.

This module will be of interest to students who wish to work in the area of intellectual property law or generally in commercial law in the European Union.

Seminars will be geared to the development of a substantial paper to be submitted at the end of the semester; there is no exam.

World Trade Organisation Law

International Taxation Law

Module Convenor: Ms. Yvonne Evans, Room 3.12.

This is a second semester module. The method of assessment is: one piece of assessed work, in the form of a 4,000 word essay to be submitted after the teaching semester.  The essay title will be released in week 10 of the semester.  The submission date will be in the first or second week of the exam diet (to be confirmed). There will also be one piece of formative work, an essay of 1,500 words completed by the end of week 6 of semester.

This module will give students an understanding of several key aspects of international taxation law. The module will address issues of tax jurisdiction for individuals and corporations, and issues arising in the taxation of cross-border transactions. We will consider the interpretation of double taxation treaties and examine attempts to tackle international tax avoidance.

Taxation is of great importance to lawyers dealing with business transactions, and this module will be of interest to students who wish to work in the area of commercial law or within government institutions.

 

 

The programme is a valuable preparation for a career in one or more of the international bodies for the administration of criminal justice or the furtherance of human rights, or in national institutions which interface with the international bodies. Equally, the programme would be a natural springboard for an academic career specialising in these fields, an obvious next step being doctoral studies.

Applicants must have, or expect to receive in the anticipated year of entry, a good honours degree in law. Exceptionally, non-law graduates with relevant legal experience may be considered. If you are concerned that your qualifications do not meet our normal expectation then please contact us.

 EU and International qualifications


English Language Requirement

IELTS Overall 6.5
Listening 6.0
Reading 6.0
Writing 6.0
Speaking 6.0

 Equivalent grades from other test providers

 

English Language Programmes

We offer Pre-Sessional and Foundation Programme(s) throughout the year. These are designed to prepare you for university study in the UK when you have not yet met the language requirements for direct entry onto a degree programme.

 Discover our English Language Programmes

The fees you pay will depend on your fee status. Your fee status is determined by us using the information you provide on your application.

 Find out more about fee status

Fee statusFees for students starting 2017-18
Scottish and EU students £5,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for UK/EU applicants
Rest of UK students £5,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for UK/EU applicants
Overseas students (non-EU) £14,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for international applicants
Fee statusFees for students starting 2018-19
Scottish and EU students £6,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for UK/EU applicants
Rest of UK students £6,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for UK/EU applicants
Overseas students (non-EU) £16,450 per year of study
See our scholarships for international applicants

You apply for this course via the UCAS Postgraduate (UKPASS) website which is free of charge. You can check the progress of your application online and you can also make multiple applications.

You'll need to upload relevant documents as part of your application. Please read the How to Apply page before you apply to find out about what you'll need.

  Degree Course Code
Apply NowInternational Criminal Justice & Human Rights LLMP044671

Course Contact

Professor Peter McEleavy
Dundee Law School
p.e.mceleavy@dundee.ac.uk
+44 (0)1382 384452

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