• For Entry: January | September
  • Duration: 12 months
  • School: Social Sciences
  • Study Mode: Full Time

For lawyers and non-lawyers: gain an understanding of the legal and regulatory environment and processes in the international energy and resources industries.

TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework
YouTube Poster Image (Cached)

The world's long-term economic development depends on the existence of efficient, innovative and creative energy and resources industries. These in turn rely on individuals who possess a sound grasp of their legal, economic, technical and policy backgrounds.

The Centre for Energy, Petroleum and Mineral Law and Policy at the University of Dundee is at the heart of these issues and provides the best in advanced education in its field, preparing its graduates to meet the challenges posed by the evolving global economy. Throughout its history, the centre has achieved continuous growth and has established international pre-eminence in its core activities: scholarly performance, high level academic research, strategic consultancy and top-quality executive education. Currently, we have over 500 registered postgraduate students from more than 50 countries world-wide.

This provides a rigorous training for graduate students and working professionals. Full-time and distance-learning degrees, intensive training programmes tailor-made for individuals or companies and short-term professional seminars are all on offer.

We will teach you the practical and professional skills you need to mastermind complex commercial and financial transactions in the international workplace, and we will expose you to many varied and exciting opportunities. 

Along with the flagship LLM in International Energy Law and Policy, there are three specialised pathways: 

 

Energy Law and Policy

Helping you meet the challenges of tomorrow

Our interdisciplinary approach to teaching, research and consultancy provides a unique perspective on how governments, business and communities operate, providing the professionals of today with the ability to meet the challenges of tomorrow.

I chose to study at the CEPMLP because of its global reputation. It is an intellectually stimulating environment with innovative pedagogical teaching and research. CEPMLP is unarguably a place to widen one's knowledge horizon and hone your expertise.

Living as an international student in Dundee has been a great experience for me. Dundee is such a wonderful friendly environment in which one would wish to be. University of Dundee of course is truly a global community of communities of people from across different continents in the world. What a safe and friendly community!

Cosmos Nwedu
Nigeria

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF)

The University of Dundee has been given a Gold award – the highest possible rating – in the 2017 Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF).

Read more about the Teaching Excellence Framework

TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework

How you will be taught

Knowledge and Understanding:

  • of the main types of international (global and regional) and national regulatory frameworks and instruments between and within individual states, as well as between companies and governments, and contractual arrangements between companies in the international energy and natural resources sectors.
  • of the key policy issues relating to law, regulation and contracts in the international energy and natural resources sectors.
  • of the jurisprudence of courts, and operation of tribunals and other dispute settlement mechanisms.

Skills

  • Undertake an evaluation of legal (or fiscal) regimes for the international energy and natural resources sectors.
  • Participate in the drafting of international agreements and national regulations or in the negotiation of an agreement between government and company or between companies, in the international energy and natural resources sectors.
  • Critically review information and critically analyse issues relating to the international energy and natural resources sectors, informed by developments at the forefront of the subject.

How you will be assessed

The LLM is made up of compulsory and elective modules. The taught component is followed by either:

  • a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a topic approved by an academic supervisor, or
  • an Internship report - students who choose this option are required to source an organisation willing to offer a 3-month work placement, approved by an academic supervisor

What you will study

LLM in International Energy Law and Policy

Energy now is a global market, and the International Law of Energy has grown exponentially, covering the entire value chain from production through to transportation and transmission to consumption.  The several pathways of this programme allow you to choose that aspect of International Energy Law that interests you most.

Core modules

Our LLM in International Energy Law and Policy is made up of a total of 180 credits

The following modules must be completed (40 Credits)

Credits:20

Overview

Downstream energy law and policy is concerned with the structure and regulation of gas and electricity markets. With the advent of liberalisation, most gas and electricity markets have become semi-competitive. There are regulatory structures to control entry to the market. There are rules on how the producers / generators interact with the suppliers – either bilateral markets or pools. There are rules for producers / generators which get special treatment – frequently state-owned companies and renewable generators. There are measures to control security of supply. There are measures dealing with pass through of costs – and attempts to ensure that the consumer price does not reach unacceptable levels.

The course looks at regulatory structures – the role of government; the role of the independent regulator; the role of the market operator and the transmission system operator. The course looks at the options for structuring liberalised and semi-competitive markets. It looks at measures to reduce investment risks for additional capacity. It recognises that the position of capacity short markets is different from that of markets with capacity excess – even if in the long term, both ultimately want the same thing…cheap and reliable delivery of the commodity.

Module leader

Stephen Dow

Credits: 20

Overview

Project financing is a tool, not an outcome in itself. This course recognises that energy projects are frequently financed by lenders. Where the lenders are content to accept repayment solely from the revenues of that project – not from the wider revenues of the sponsor – there is a limitation of recourse (or at the extreme an absence of recourse). That is project financing. The course looks at how various types of energy project can be structured to achieve that goal. The bank is not an equity risk taker – its business is to take credit risks. Project finance will force the bank to take a degree of project risk, so the bank will demand a contractual structure which mitigates that risk exposure. The course is concerned with understanding the risks for various energy projects – oil development; gas development; power generators; mining projects etc – and seeing how the principle risks inherent in those projects are moved by contract to the party best able to bear the risk. The course understands that where the bank is happy with the project risk profile, it will lend. If the bank is not happy with the project risk profile, it will not lend. The course looks at the risks which can be moved and how are they moved to a party acceptable to the lender – whilst at the same time ensuring that the holder of that risk is happy with the level of payment for taking that risk.

Module leader

Stephen Dow

Core Specialist

A minimum of 60 credits

Credits:20

Overview

The main objective of the course is to provide an introduction to the fundamental concepts and specific legal and jurisdictional issues in the field of international and transboundary natural resources.

The emphasis is on ensuring a proper understanding of the existing legal mechanisms and international regimes applicable to various types of natural resources located beyond States’ jurisdiction or control.

Module leader

Dr Sergei Vinogradov

In this module, students will master how the mining sector contributes to global supply chains and their effect on international commerce. This mining course examines the key challenges facing the mining sector in the modern world and a student will leave ready for the professional world.

Indicative Topics covered:

  • The International Agenda for Sustainability
  • The Economics of the  Mining Industry
  • Technical & Usage Issues in the  Mining Sector
  • Global Mining Supply Chains: Case Study Examples
  • New Law and Policy – The Energy Life-Cycle
  • Transparency & Mining
  • Taxation & Mining
  • A Low-Carbon Mining Sector
  • Environmental & Climate Change Challenges from Mining

Credits: 20

Overview

Module aims:

  • to develop an understanding of renewable energy resources and the numerous technologies that converts it into useful forms
  • to develop an understanding of the economic issues of renewable energy research, development and deployment at both private and commercial scale
  • to develop an understanding of government and industry policies to encourage the deployment of renewable energy production and use

Module leader

Dr Ariel Bergmann

Credits:20

Overview

The Transatlantic Negotiation Exercise will be carried out between the Masters students at the CEPMLP and the post-graduate students at the Washington College of Law of the American University, International Legal Studies Programme.

The main aim of this module is to provide a formal forum in which using tried and tested methods of international negotiations, in a detailed form, the participants can gain or improve their negotiating skills.

Module leader

Mrs Janeth Warden-Fernandez

The aim of this module is to examine the treatment of foreign investments in public international law, with particular attention to the energy market, and to examine the interplay between international investment law, sustainable development and human rights.

Examples of content:

  • Origins, history and nature of international investment law
  • Sources of international investment law
  • Traditional and new models of bilateral investment treaties, and regional investment treaties
  • Investment contracts
  • Key legal obligations of the host State and of the foreign investor
  • Introduction to investor-state dispute settlement mechanisms
  • International investment law and energy law
  • International investment law, sustainable development and human rights

Competition Law

Aims

This module provides an advanced understanding of modern competition law with primary focus on the law and policy of the EU and UK. It covers the main areas of competition law that students would be most likely to encounter in practice, enforcement, or further legal research.

Examples of content

This module focuses on cartels and restrictive agreements; abuse of a dominant position;and the review of mergers and acquisitions under competition law:

  • introduction to competition law and policy
  • the law relating to horizontal restrictive agreements
  • the law relating to vertical restrictive agreements
  • introduction to competition law and practice relating to abuse of a dominant position
  • merger clearance law

SCQF credits

20 credits

Compulsory Choice Modules

40 credits from

Credits: 40

Overview

The dissertation contributes to the achievement of the aims of the Masters degree namely:- to promote a deeper and critical understanding of selected areas relating to the specialisation of the student; to develop originality of thought and skills of research, analysis, argumentation and expression; to build upon, develop and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired in the taught modules.

A dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a topic approved by an academic supervisor.

Credits: 40

Overview

The internship provides the student with the opportunity to apply in the workplace the knowledge and skills learnt at CEPMLP and to learn how professionals in the field perform their tasks.

Students who choose this option are required to source an organisation willing to offer a 2-month work placement, approved by an academic supervisor. The Internship includes the submission of a written report as part of the assessment.

The internship requires an intellectual report of approximately 10,000 words

Elective Modules

Sufficient modules from the academic timetable to bring the total number of credits to 180.

In common with other CEPMLP LLM degrees, any approved module can be included in the elective modules.

LLM in International Energy Dispute Resolution & Avoidance (IEDRA)

The settlement and indeed avoidance of disputes relating to energy is an essential part of modern International Energy Law and of great practical relevance.

In this pathway, you will study both public and private means of settling energy disputes, investor-state arbitration as well as the foundations of commercial arbitration.  You will also study how to avoid disputes through contract design and alternative means of managing disputes before you go to arbitration.

Our LLM in International Energy Dispute Avoidance & Resolution (IEDRA) is made up of a total of 180 credits

Core Modules - The following modules must be completed (80 credits)

Credits:20

Overview

Downstream energy law and policy is concerned with the structure and regulation of gas and electricity markets. With the advent of liberalisation, most gas and electricity markets have become semi-competitive. There are regulatory structures to control entry to the market. There are rules on how the producers / generators interact with the suppliers – either bilateral markets or pools. There are rules for producers / generators which get special treatment – frequently state-owned companies and renewable generators. There are measures to control security of supply. There are measures dealing with pass through of costs – and attempts to ensure that the consumer price does not reach unacceptable levels.

The course looks at regulatory structures – the role of government; the role of the independent regulator; the role of the market operator and the transmission system operator. The course looks at the options for structuring liberalised and semi-competitive markets. It looks at measures to reduce investment risks for additional capacity. It recognises that the position of capacity short markets is different from that of markets with capacity excess – even if in the long term, both ultimately want the same thing…cheap and reliable delivery of the commodity.

Module leader

Stephen Dow

Credits: 20

Overview

Project financing is a tool, not an outcome in itself. This course recognises that energy projects are frequently financed by lenders. Where the lenders are content to accept repayment solely from the revenues of that project – not from the wider revenues of the sponsor – there is a limitation of recourse (or at the extreme an absence of recourse). That is project financing. The course looks at how various types of energy project can be structured to achieve that goal. The bank is not an equity risk taker – its business is to take credit risks. Project finance will force the bank to take a degree of project risk, so the bank will demand a contractual structure which mitigates that risk exposure. The course is concerned with understanding the risks for various energy projects – oil development; gas development; power generators; mining projects etc – and seeing how the principle risks inherent in those projects are moved by contract to the party best able to bear the risk. The course understands that where the bank is happy with the project risk profile, it will lend. If the bank is not happy with the project risk profile, it will not lend. The course looks at the risks which can be moved and how are they moved to a party acceptable to the lender – whilst at the same time ensuring that the holder of that risk is happy with the level of payment for taking that risk.

Module leader

Stephen Dow

Credits: 20

Overview

To enable students to understand the evolving complex practical issues of international arbitration, in the context of both investment relationships between states and foreign investors as well as those between parties to normal commercial contracts, faced by lawyers as counsel to the parties and as arbitrators and to equip them with the necessary skills on how to handle such issues.

Module leader

Professor Pieter Bekker

Credits: 20

Overview

This course has two aims:

  • to develop a solid understanding of the applicability, and application, of multiple sets of legal norms (domestic/international, public/private) to the extractive industries
  • to develop skills for addressing key legal issues facing the extractive industries in the various stages of contracting and investing and the manner in which problems and options can be analysed and addressed

Module leader

Professor Pieter Bekker

Core Specialist - A minimum of 40 credits from

The aim of the module is to develop a critical understanding of objectives and implementation of the European Energy Union, the international underpinning, EU and domestic Law and the potential to serve as a case study beyond Europe.

The just transition to a low-carbon economy is the greatest societal challenge of our time. As societies worldwide work towards 2030, 2040, and 2050 energy, climate and sustainability goals there is a need to ensure these are achieved in a ‘just’ way. Society in future has to be fair and equitable and also one where inequalities are addressed and resolved. This interdisciplinary course covers all of these complex challenges as countries worldwide aim to achieve a just transition to a low-carbon economy.

Indicative Topics covered:

  • What is the Just Transition
  • The Value of a Just Transition
  • The Role of Energy in the World Economy
  • A Changing Commercial Sector & Sustainability
  • An Energy Transition till 2100
  • Policy Development for a Just Transition
  • Industry Case Studies
  • Enforcing a ‘Just’ Transition
  • Key Actions & Scenario Planning
  • Emerging practices in achieving a the low-carbon economy

Credits:20

Overview

The main objective of this course is to help the students to understand the int’l environments and of the interaction between international relations (IR) and energy and natural resources industry. This module, together with International Political Economy, is being introduced in order to provide an important political element to the MBA, LLM and MSc Programmes in general, and to form an important part of the specification of Geopolitics of Energy in particular.

Module leader

Dr Janet Xuanli Liao

Credits:20

Overview

The Transatlantic Negotiation Exercise will be carried out between the Masters students at the CEPMLP and the post-graduate students at the Washington College of Law of the American University, International Legal Studies Programme.

The main aim of this module is to provide a formal forum in which using tried and tested methods of international negotiations, in a detailed form, the participants can gain or improve their negotiating skills.

Module leader

Mrs Janeth Warden-Fernandez

The aim of this module is to examine the treatment of foreign investments in public international law, with particular attention to the energy market, and to examine the interplay between international investment law, sustainable development and human rights.

Examples of content:

  • Origins, history and nature of international investment law
  • Sources of international investment law
  • Traditional and new models of bilateral investment treaties, and regional investment treaties
  • Investment contracts
  • Key legal obligations of the host State and of the foreign investor
  • Introduction to investor-state dispute settlement mechanisms
  • International investment law and energy law
  • International investment law, sustainable development and human rights

Compulsory Choice Modules – 40 credits from

Credits: 40

Overview

The dissertation contributes to the achievement of the aims of the Masters degree namely:- to promote a deeper and critical understanding of selected areas relating to the specialisation of the student; to develop originality of thought and skills of research, analysis, argumentation and expression; to build upon, develop and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired in the taught modules.

A dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a topic approved by an academic supervisor.

Credits: 40

Overview

The internship provides the student with the opportunity to apply in the workplace the knowledge and skills learnt at CEPMLP and to learn how professionals in the field perform their tasks.

Students who choose this option are required to source an organisation willing to offer a 2-month work placement, approved by an academic supervisor. The Internship includes the submission of a written report as part of the assessment.

The internship requires an intellectual report of approximately 10,000 words

LLM in International and European Union Electricity Markets

International Law governs International Electricity Markets.  In this pathway, you will study several models of regulating transboundary electricity flows, including the European Energy Union.

Our LLM in International and European Union Electricity Markets is made up of a total of 180 credits

Core Modules - The following modules must be completed (80 credits)

Credits:20

Overview

Downstream energy law and policy is concerned with the structure and regulation of gas and electricity markets. With the advent of liberalisation, most gas and electricity markets have become semi-competitive. There are regulatory structures to control entry to the market. There are rules on how the producers / generators interact with the suppliers – either bilateral markets or pools. There are rules for producers / generators which get special treatment – frequently state-owned companies and renewable generators. There are measures to control security of supply. There are measures dealing with pass through of costs – and attempts to ensure that the consumer price does not reach unacceptable levels.

The course looks at regulatory structures – the role of government; the role of the independent regulator; the role of the market operator and the transmission system operator. The course looks at the options for structuring liberalised and semi-competitive markets. It looks at measures to reduce investment risks for additional capacity. It recognises that the position of capacity short markets is different from that of markets with capacity excess – even if in the long term, both ultimately want the same thing…cheap and reliable delivery of the commodity.

Module leader

Stephen Dow

The aim of the module is to develop a critical understanding of objectives and implementation of the European Energy Union, the international underpinning, EU and domestic Law and the potential to serve as a case study beyond Europe.

The aim of the module is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the policy and legal problems of renewable energy sources (RES) and technologies, including scientific background, investment and regulation, and integration into the electricity grid and legal underpinnings at the international, European and domestic level. It aims at providing the necessary knowledge and skills to address these problems and hence climate change effectively and timely.

Credits: 20

Overview

Project financing is a tool, not an outcome in itself. This course recognises that energy projects are frequently financed by lenders. Where the lenders are content to accept repayment solely from the revenues of that project – not from the wider revenues of the sponsor – there is a limitation of recourse (or at the extreme an absence of recourse). That is project financing. The course looks at how various types of energy project can be structured to achieve that goal. The bank is not an equity risk taker – its business is to take credit risks. Project finance will force the bank to take a degree of project risk, so the bank will demand a contractual structure which mitigates that risk exposure. The course is concerned with understanding the risks for various energy projects – oil development; gas development; power generators; mining projects etc – and seeing how the principle risks inherent in those projects are moved by contract to the party best able to bear the risk. The course understands that where the bank is happy with the project risk profile, it will lend. If the bank is not happy with the project risk profile, it will not lend. The course looks at the risks which can be moved and how are they moved to a party acceptable to the lender – whilst at the same time ensuring that the holder of that risk is happy with the level of payment for taking that risk.

Module leader

Stephen Dow

Core Specialist - A minimum of 40 credits from

The just transition to a low-carbon economy is the greatest societal challenge of our time. As societies worldwide work towards 2030, 2040, and 2050 energy, climate and sustainability goals there is a need to ensure these are achieved in a ‘just’ way. Society in future has to be fair and equitable and also one where inequalities are addressed and resolved. This interdisciplinary course covers all of these complex challenges as countries worldwide aim to achieve a just transition to a low-carbon economy.

Indicative Topics covered:

  • What is the Just Transition
  • The Value of a Just Transition
  • The Role of Energy in the World Economy
  • A Changing Commercial Sector & Sustainability
  • An Energy Transition till 2100
  • Policy Development for a Just Transition
  • Industry Case Studies
  • Enforcing a ‘Just’ Transition
  • Key Actions & Scenario Planning
  • Emerging practices in achieving a the low-carbon economy

Credits:20

Overview

The main objective of this course is to help the students to understand the int’l environments and of the interaction between international relations (IR) and energy and natural resources industry. This module, together with International Political Economy, is being introduced in order to provide an important political element to the MBA, LLM and MSc Programmes in general, and to form an important part of the specification of Geopolitics of Energy in particular.

Module leader

Dr Janet Xuanli Liao

Credits: 20

Overview

The aims of the module are to convey an economic and institutional knowledge of the electric power sector, and to develop the capacity for analysing the economic and policy issues of the electric power sector. The intended learning outcomes of the module are an understanding of the workings of the electric power industry and its economic fundamentals; and the skills to evaluate power system resources and their implications for competition or regulation. The module is designed for an interdisciplinary audience. It is delivered through lectures, problem sets, and virtual direction. It is assessed through the problem sets, an essay, and an examination. A familiarity with microeconomics principles or numerical techniques is not required but would be helpful.

Module leader

Dr Rafael (Manny) Macatangay

Competition Law

Aims

This module provides an advanced understanding of modern competition law with primary focus on the law and policy of the EU and UK. It covers the main areas of competition law that students would be most likely to encounter in practice, enforcement, or further legal research.

Examples of content

This module focuses on cartels and restrictive agreements; abuse of a dominant position;and the review of mergers and acquisitions under competition law:

  • introduction to competition law and policy
  • the law relating to horizontal restrictive agreements
  • the law relating to vertical restrictive agreements
  • introduction to competition law and practice relating to abuse of a dominant position
  • merger clearance law

SCQF credits

20 credits

International Taxation Law

Aims

To examine critically the law relating to taxation in an international context. The module will look at jurisdiction to tax individuals and businesses, the causes of double taxation and ways in which domestic systems seek to deal with double taxation where activities attracting taxation are carried out over more than one country –namely through double taxation treaties. The module will look at how different countries seek to protect their tax base against tax avoidance.

Examples of content

  • jurisdiction to tax –corporate residence
  • permanent establishment
  • taxation of business profits
  • double tax treaties –interpretation
  • international tax avoidance
  • BEPS and countering international tax avoidance

SCQF credits

20 credits

The aim of the module is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the international legal framework on climate change.

Examples of content:

  • Community interests and common concerns of humankind: the development of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol
  • Protecting the climate through international law: the Paris Agreement
  • The Vienna Convention on the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer
  • Multiple reduction pathways, carbon technologies and the carbon market
  • Human Rights Instruments to protect the right to a healthy environment
  • The role of scientific evidence and climate modelling in climate litigation

Compulsory Choice Modules – 40 credits from:

Credits: 40

Overview

The dissertation contributes to the achievement of the aims of the Masters degree namely:- to promote a deeper and critical understanding of selected areas relating to the specialisation of the student; to develop originality of thought and skills of research, analysis, argumentation and expression; to build upon, develop and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired in the taught modules.

A dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a topic approved by an academic supervisor.

Credits: 40

Overview

The internship provides the student with the opportunity to apply in the workplace the knowledge and skills learnt at CEPMLP and to learn how professionals in the field perform their tasks.

Students who choose this option are required to source an organisation willing to offer a 2-month work placement, approved by an academic supervisor. The Internship includes the submission of a written report as part of the assessment.

The internship requires an intellectual report of approximately 10,000 words

LLM in The Low Carbon Economy

Countries around the world realize the enormity of the challenge of a Just Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy. They are putting in place the legislative and policy steps needed to achieve it. In terms of the Just Transition, it centres on key societal issues that are a feature of the energy sector globally such as around jobs, disclosure and transparency, ethics and equality. Further, it resonates with society owing to the increased visibility of pollution and its effects on the environment, for example, air pollution levels being constantly exceeded, and the transfer of waste into the food supply chain (i.e. fish and plastics). The imperative to educate the next generation on how we achieve a just transition to a low-carbon economy is growing fast and this Masters degree programme on the Low-Carbon Just Transition aims to play its role!

Our LLM in The Low Carbon Economy is made up of a total of 180 credits

Core Modules - The following modules must be completed (80 credits)

Credits:20

Overview

Downstream energy law and policy is concerned with the structure and regulation of gas and electricity markets. With the advent of liberalisation, most gas and electricity markets have become semi-competitive. There are regulatory structures to control entry to the market. There are rules on how the producers / generators interact with the suppliers – either bilateral markets or pools. There are rules for producers / generators which get special treatment – frequently state-owned companies and renewable generators. There are measures to control security of supply. There are measures dealing with pass through of costs – and attempts to ensure that the consumer price does not reach unacceptable levels.

The course looks at regulatory structures – the role of government; the role of the independent regulator; the role of the market operator and the transmission system operator. The course looks at the options for structuring liberalised and semi-competitive markets. It looks at measures to reduce investment risks for additional capacity. It recognises that the position of capacity short markets is different from that of markets with capacity excess – even if in the long term, both ultimately want the same thing…cheap and reliable delivery of the commodity.

Module leader

Stephen Dow

This interdisciplinary course challenges students to think about the global challenges that our society faces in our energy sectors and to our climate. As there is a realization that there are significant problems to be resolved, this course examines the policy initiatives and issues of conflict around the world. There is increased legal action on many energy and climate issues globally, and this is one of the world’s first courses examine this area with an interdisciplinary approach covering science, policy and law.

Indicative Topics covered:

  • Energy & Climate Science: The Basics
  • Worldwide Energy & Climate Policy Initiatives
  • Ethics and Accountability in the Energy Sector
  • Accountancy Practices, Taxation and CSR
  • Modern Slavery Act, FCPA, Bribery and Corruption Act
  • EIAs and Equator Principles (International Finance)
  • Ethical Investments, SWFs
  • Subsidies
  • Business & Human Rights (IBA)
  • Energy & Climate Litigation (local, national, and international)

The just transition to a low-carbon economy is the greatest societal challenge of our time. As societies worldwide work towards 2030, 2040, and 2050 energy, climate and sustainability goals there is a need to ensure these are achieved in a ‘just’ way. Society in future has to be fair and equitable and also one where inequalities are addressed and resolved. This interdisciplinary course covers all of these complex challenges as countries worldwide aim to achieve a just transition to a low-carbon economy.

Indicative Topics covered:

  • What is the Just Transition
  • The Value of a Just Transition
  • The Role of Energy in the World Economy
  • A Changing Commercial Sector & Sustainability
  • An Energy Transition till 2100
  • Policy Development for a Just Transition
  • Industry Case Studies
  • Enforcing a ‘Just’ Transition
  • Key Actions & Scenario Planning
  • Emerging practices in achieving a the low-carbon economy

Credits: 20

Overview

Project financing is a tool, not an outcome in itself. This course recognises that energy projects are frequently financed by lenders. Where the lenders are content to accept repayment solely from the revenues of that project – not from the wider revenues of the sponsor – there is a limitation of recourse (or at the extreme an absence of recourse). That is project financing. The course looks at how various types of energy project can be structured to achieve that goal. The bank is not an equity risk taker – its business is to take credit risks. Project finance will force the bank to take a degree of project risk, so the bank will demand a contractual structure which mitigates that risk exposure. The course is concerned with understanding the risks for various energy projects – oil development; gas development; power generators; mining projects etc – and seeing how the principle risks inherent in those projects are moved by contract to the party best able to bear the risk. The course understands that where the bank is happy with the project risk profile, it will lend. If the bank is not happy with the project risk profile, it will not lend. The course looks at the risks which can be moved and how are they moved to a party acceptable to the lender – whilst at the same time ensuring that the holder of that risk is happy with the level of payment for taking that risk.

Module leader

Stephen Dow

Core Specialist - A minimum of 40 credits from

In this module, students will master how the mining sector contributes to global supply chains and their effect on international commerce. This mining course examines the key challenges facing the mining sector in the modern world and a student will leave ready for the professional world.

Indicative Topics covered:

  • The International Agenda for Sustainability
  • The Economics of the  Mining Industry
  • Technical & Usage Issues in the  Mining Sector
  • Global Mining Supply Chains: Case Study Examples
  • New Law and Policy – The Energy Life-Cycle
  • Transparency & Mining
  • Taxation & Mining
  • A Low-Carbon Mining Sector
  • Environmental & Climate Change Challenges from Mining

Credits:20

Overview

The objective of the module is to enhance students" understanding of the interplay of climate change politics at the international and domestic levels. Employing the Two-Levels game theory as an analytical framework, the module, on the one hand, attempts to reveal the power struggles between the major powers under the Kyoto Protocol, together with the flawed Kyoto system. On the other hand, it looks into domestic factors of the major CO2 emitters, in order to explain the difficult choices facing their leaderships, and the complexity involved in climate change governance.

Module leader

Dr Janet Xuanli Liao

Credits: 20

Overview

Module aims:

  • to develop an understanding of renewable energy resources and the numerous technologies that converts it into useful forms
  • to develop an understanding of the economic issues of renewable energy research, development and deployment at both private and commercial scale
  • to develop an understanding of government and industry policies to encourage the deployment of renewable energy production and use

Module leader

Dr Ariel Bergmann

Credits: 20

Overview

The aims of the module are to convey an economic and institutional knowledge of the electric power sector, and to develop the capacity for analysing the economic and policy issues of the electric power sector. The intended learning outcomes of the module are an understanding of the workings of the electric power industry and its economic fundamentals; and the skills to evaluate power system resources and their implications for competition or regulation. The module is designed for an interdisciplinary audience. It is delivered through lectures, problem sets, and virtual direction. It is assessed through the problem sets, an essay, and an examination. A familiarity with microeconomics principles or numerical techniques is not required but would be helpful.

Module leader

Dr Rafael (Manny) Macatangay

The aim of this module is to ground students in the principles of sustainability and sustainable development, to explore the linkages between theory and practice, and examine how more sustainable futures can be achieved in practice.

The educational aims are to provide an overview of sustainability principles within an international context – including key theories, concepts and appreciation of the contested nature of discourses in this area; develop critical interdisciplinary skills enabling linkages to be made across disciplinary boundaries and professional sectors and to emphasise the cross-cutting nature of sustainability issues and develop skills to examine how individuals and society move towards more sustainable practices.

Module leader

Thomas Munizer

Compulsory Choice Modules – 40 credits from:

Credits: 40

Overview

The dissertation contributes to the achievement of the aims of the Masters degree namely:- to promote a deeper and critical understanding of selected areas relating to the specialisation of the student; to develop originality of thought and skills of research, analysis, argumentation and expression; to build upon, develop and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired in the taught modules.

A dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a topic approved by an academic supervisor.

Credits: 40

Overview

The internship provides the student with the opportunity to apply in the workplace the knowledge and skills learnt at CEPMLP and to learn how professionals in the field perform their tasks.

Students who choose this option are required to source an organisation willing to offer a 2-month work placement, approved by an academic supervisor. The Internship includes the submission of a written report as part of the assessment.

The internship requires an intellectual report of approximately 10,000 words

What sort of jobs do alumni of CEPMLP go on to do?

The answer is a wide range of varied roles. It is important to be aware that as with any job it depends upon your level of experience and skills set as to whether the role would be suitable for you, there is no one size fits all.

 

Energy Law and Policy

CEPMLP graduates are highly employable

Past alumni have found employment with a variety of organisations including National Oil Companies, Exploration and Production Companies, Government and Ministries and Commercial Organisations including Banks, Law Firms and Global Consultancies.

I chose distance learning with CEPMLP because it provides the right balance of applied academic and industry perspectives, which is essential in today’s market place. I’ve held a number senior positions in the energy industry for over 10 years. Keeping pace in today’s business world of energy economics and policy, requires a problem solving mind-set. The advanced learning I’ve received from my CEPMLP course provides real-world application from the outset. This sets my course apart from others I’ve investigated thoroughly. Taking this LLM, I needed to be confident that it would influence my work place and not be purely an academic exercise, although academic credibility is essential.

The course is challenging but the modular format means it’s possible to be realistic about fitting it around work and family life. Best of all, I’m already applying my knowledge to better inform colleagues and clients, and bring a fresh perspective. It just proves it’s not impossible to be over educated!

Steve Freeman

For many of us coming from Africa to study, one would realise that the extractive industry is particularly becoming critical to our economies back home. I can immediately refer to Ghana’s growing influence in the oil and gas industry, having begun commercial production of its oil in 2010.

The knowledge offered at CEPMLP is extremely valuable and prepares us adequately to take up challenging roles within the entire energy industry, given the multi-disciplinary nature of teaching and learning at this globally recognised graduate centre. The teaching faculty are a group of dynamic people who command huge heights within the energy industry and offer the most edge-cutting perspective to the issues and trends of the global energy world. You can trust that even if you don’t leave here top of your class, you leave with your intellectual curiosity highly satisfied and at best; highly provoked to do further research on areas that interest you.

Dundee offers you a standard of living you won’t find elsewhere in the UK. It’s a great way to find yourself connected to the beautiful old Scottish way of life. Scotland is fast becoming a place after my heart.

Joseph Nii Tettey Ashong
Ghana

You should have the equivalent to a UK Honours degree, preferably at 2:1 level or above. Candidates with a 2:2 degree may also apply. Preferred degree disciplines are Law, Economics, Geology, Petroleum or Mining Engineering, Finance.

Work experience in the energy/natural resources industry is an advantage, though it is not a strict requirement for admission to the MSc.

 EU and International qualifications


English Language Requirement

IELTS Overall 6.5
Listening 6.0
Reading 6.0
Writing 6.0
Speaking 6.0

 Equivalent grades from other test providers

 

English Language Programmes

We offer Pre-Sessional and Foundation Programme(s) throughout the year. These are designed to prepare you for university study in the UK when you have not yet met the language requirements for direct entry onto a degree programme.

 Discover our English Language Programmes

The fees you pay will depend on your fee status. Your fee status is determined by us using the information you provide on your application.

 Find out more about fee status

Fee statusFees for students starting academic year 2019-20
Scottish and EU students £10,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for UK/EU applicants
Rest of UK students £10,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for UK/EU applicants
Overseas students (non-EU) £17,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for International applicants

Additional costs

You may incur additional costs in the course of your education at the University over and above tuition fees in an academic year.

Examples of additional costs:

One off costOngoing costIncidental cost
Graduation feeStudio feeField trips

*these are examples only and are not exhaustive.

Additional costs:

  • may be mandatory or optional expenses
  • may be one off, ongoing or incidental charges and certain costs may be payable annually for each year of your programme of study
  • vary depending on your programme of study
  • are payable by you and are non-refundable and non-transferable

Unfortunately, failure to pay additional costs may result in limitations on your student experience.

For additional costs specific to your course please speak to our Enquiry Team.

You apply for this course through our Direct Application System, which is free of charge. You can find out more information about making your application when you click Apply Now below

  Degree Course code
Apply nowInternational Energy Law and Policy LLMP024443
Apply nowInternational Energy Dispute Resolution and Avoidance LLMTFMLLMDAENLP
Apply nowInternational and European Electricity Markets LLMTFMLLMDAENLP
Apply nowThe Low Carbon Just Transition LLMTFMLLMDAENLP

Course Contact

Mr Stephen Dow
Centre for Energy, Petroleum and Mineral Law and Policy
s.r.dow@dundee.ac.uk
+44 (0)1382 384818

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