• For Entry: September
  • Duration: 24 months
  • School: Social Sciences
  • Study Mode: Full Time

Gain two masters degrees in energy finance which will give you the edge in a highly competitive global energy sector.

TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework

 

First Minister of Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon, witnesses signing of agreement between the University of Dundee and China University of Petroleum Beijing (CUPB).

Photo of Nicola Sturgeon and CUPB group

You will study at two world renowned institutions: Chinese University of Petroleum Beijing (CUPB) and University of Dundee. Together we will teach you to analyse and evaluate key concepts and practical applications in the energy sector with a focus on finance. Upon completion of the course you will gain two masters degrees, one from Chinese University of Petroleum Beijing and one from the University of Dundee.  This will set you apart from others when you are job hunting.  

With China's "Belt and Road Initiative", demand for innovative, internationally educated graduates to work in the energy sector is increasing sharply both from Chinese companies and companies doing business with China. The knowledge you will gain from this course will prepare you to work internationally in energy and financial sectors.  

We have established links with corporations including CNPC, Sinopec, Total, and ADNOC.

Your first year will be taught in Beijing, China and your second year will be taught in Dundee, Scotland.  

First year - CUPB

In your first year, spent at CUPB, all classes are taught in English. Lecturers include faculty from world-leading universities and international experts from the energy sector.

You will have the opportunity to take part in international exchanges, high-level conferences, and internships.

China University of Petroleum-Beijing, founded in 1953, is a '211' national university. It is the national leader in petroleum-related subjects. CUPB is highly ranked in subjects ranging from geosciences to petroleum engineering, chemical engineering, mechanical and pipeline engineering and business administration. It was recently selected for the "Double First Class" project, a project that will support universities to achieve world-leading status, in petroleum engineering and geosciences.

Second year - Dundee

In your second year, in Dundee, you will be taught within the University's Centre for Energy, Petroleum and Mineral Law Policy (CEPMLP). Founded in 1977, CEPMLP is the oldest continually-operating energy and resources centre in the UK. It is one of the most prestigious specialist centres in the world. It has an excellent teaching record and receives many large research grants from the World Bank, the ESRC/DFID and EU Horizon2020.

The teaching and research at CEPMLP is internationally-focused. Our network of more than 4000 alumni spreads across the world. Our alumni work in almost every oil, gas and mineral producing and major consuming country. Some are at ministerial levels, for example the Secretary General of the International Energy Forum.

You will gain close links with industry through participation in our seminars, workshops and professional training. You will also be able to undertake placements and internships.

YouTube Poster Image (Cached)

Dundee is a multicultural university where you can meet people from different cultures and backgrounds. It provides an opportunity to learn about traditions, languages and to make friends from all over the world. Studying at Dundee has definitely played a huge role in setting me up for my working life; it gave me valuable experience, and taught me that knowledge teamed with common sense and drive will ultimately get you where you want to go.

Li Zuxin
MSc Energy Studies (Oil & Gas Economics)

Internships

You will have the opportunity to complete an internship such as: Platts Internship Program in Singapore, China-UAE and China-Israel Summer School, etc, connecting you with key individuals in the energy sector.

Language opportunities

The course is taught in English, both in Beijing and Dundee.  You will also have the opportunity to learn Chinese which will broaden your employment prospects.

 

CUPB is highly ranked in subjects ranging from geosciences to petroleum engineering, chemical engineering, geophysics, mechanical and pipeline engineering and business administration.

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF)

The University of Dundee has been given a Gold award – the highest possible rating – in the 2017 Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF).

Read more about the Teaching Excellence Framework

TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework

How you will be taught

You will be taught with:

  • lectures
  • student-led presentations
  • individual study
  • group work
  • role-play exercises
  • simulations
  • internships

How you will be assessed

You will be assessed by:

  • Exams
  • Group presentations
  • Essays for each module
  • Final project report or internship report

Year 1 – at China University of Petroleum Beijing, China

The goal of this course is to introduce you to concepts and computational techniques used by large organizations (such as the military, big business, and major universities) to most efficiently manage resources, maximize profits and/or minimize costs (operations research is also often called management science).

This covers a number of topics including consumer and demand theory, firm, production and cost theory, competitive market theory, imperfect competition, welfare economics, and game theory. Readings and discussion sections will demonstrate the applicability of the tools covered in class to topics with an international dimension, related to the energy fields, such as the setting of tariffs, carbon tax and resource externalities.

This course covers both the theoretical foundations of econometrics and how to use the econometric tools in applied economic research. We will discuss statistical and econometric techniques for estimating various economic relationships or models for the purpose of hypothesis testing and/or forecasting. Applications to energy markets, the general business and economic environment will be emphasized.

The course introduces you to contemporary theories and practice of investments. It is meant to be a general overview of investments. Topics will include valuation of stocks and bonds, portfolio theory, risk management through immunization, options and futures, and performance evaluation.

This course aims to introduce the leading theories in the area of corporate finance, and discuss the relationship between financial market and corporate strategy. From this course, you are expected to master the theory of corporate finance systematically, have a more comprehensive understanding of corporate financial policy, and equip yourself with a firm foundation of financial knowledge for your future career.

This course will focus on two parts of macroeconomics. The first part is an understanding of the data and data sources necessary to a sophisticated knowledge of the world economy, particularly the economies of China, the United States and the European Union. The second part is a review of modern post-Keynesian macroeconomic theory.

The course is for students who have a knowledge and understanding of basic financial theory and methods, and will do further study on how to combine energy and finance to resolve practical problems, including energy trading, trading tools and price formation mechanism; oil, natural gas and electricity trading system design and price mechanism; carbon financial innovation mechanism and energy company applications and so on.

February – July

  • Dissertation

Year 2 – at University of Dundee, Scotland

August

  • Optional Pre-Sessional English Language Programme

September – August

Core Modules

The following modules must be completed (40 credits):

Credits: 20

Overview

The aims of the module are to introduce the economic principles relevant for the energy sector, and to provide an overview of the tools typically used in performing economic analysis on the energy sector. The intended learning outcomes of the module are an understanding of the essential concepts and frameworks central to the operation and expansion of the energy sector, their economic implications, and the basic economic tools for analysing them. The module is designed for an interdisciplinary audience. It is delivered through lectures, computer laboratory work, and virtual direction. It is assessed through class participation, a research paper, and an examination. A familiarity with microeconomics principles or numerical techniques is not required but would be helpful.

Module leader

Dr Rafael (Manny) Macatangay

Credits: 20

Overview

The aims of the module are to introduce the economic principles relevant for the energy sector, and to highlight some of the most challenging economic issues facing the global energy complex. The intended learning outcome of the module is an understanding of how economic analysis informs the national and international debates on energy sector issues, and how economics research affects energy sector decisions made by industry or government. The module is designed for an interdisciplinary audience. It is delivered through lectures and virtual direction. It is assessed through class participation, a research paper, and an examination. A familiarity with microeconomics principles or numerical techniques is not required but would be helpful.

Module leader

Dr Rafael (Manny) Macatangay

Core Specialist Modules

A minimum of 40 credits from:

Credits: 20

Overview

The main aim of this course is to introduce students to current methods of financial and project appraisal techniques that relate to natural resources and energy organisations. This is a practical course in which evaluation techniques and concepts are taught, such as discounted cash flow, internal rate of return and payback period, which are applied to realistic scenarios, leading to the preparation of spreadsheets, their analysis and interpretation of results. The student should be able to recommend the appropriate appraisal techniques to a given business investment along with an appreciation of social and other non-financial features. Taxation and sources of finance are also introduced in this module, but any in-depth analyses of them can only be provided in other courses.

Credits: 20

Overview

Project financing is a tool, not an outcome in itself. This course recognises that energy projects are frequently financed by lenders. Where the lenders are content to accept repayment solely from the revenues of that project – not from the wider revenues of the sponsor – there is a limitation of recourse (or at the extreme an absence of recourse). That is project financing. The course looks at how various types of energy project can be structured to achieve that goal. The bank is not an equity risk taker – its business is to take credit risks. Project finance will force the bank to take a degree of project risk, so the bank will demand a contractual structure which mitigates that risk exposure. The course is concerned with understanding the risks for various energy projects – oil development; gas development; power generators; mining projects etc – and seeing how the principle risks inherent in those projects are moved by contract to the party best able to bear the risk. The course understands that where the bank is happy with the project risk profile, it will lend. If the bank is not happy with the project risk profile, it will not lend. The course looks at the risks which can be moved and how are they moved to a party acceptable to the lender – whilst at the same time ensuring that the holder of that risk is happy with the level of payment for taking that risk.

Module leader

Stephen Dow

Credits:20

Overview

The main objective of this module is to provide students with a practical understanding of commercial strategies currently utilized in the energy trading industry. The module will give an introductory overview, and practical applications of the financial and economic theories, and methodologies utilised in real and financial trading activities, options pricing, real options valuation techniques and asset optimization.

Module leader

Dr Jennifer Considine

Compulsory Choice Modules

20 credits from: 

Credits: 20

Overview

The project report contributes to the achievement of the aims of the Masters degree, by:

  • promoting a deep and critical understanding of specific issues to the specialisation of the student
  • developing originality of thought and the skills of research, analysis, argumentation and expression
  • building upon, developing and integrating the knowledge and skills acquired in taught modules

The project report should be approximately 8000 words.

Credits: 20

Overview

The internship provides the student with the opportunity to apply in the workplace the knowledge and skills learnt at CEPMLP and to learn how professionals in the field perform their tasks.

Students who choose this option are required to source an organisation willing to offer a 3-month work placement, approved by an academic supervisor. The Internship includes the submission of a written report as part of the assessment.

The internship requires an intellectual report of approximately 5000 words.

Elective Modules

Sufficient modules from the academic timetable to bring the total number of credits to 140.

In common with other CEPMLP MSc Energy Studies degrees, any approved module can be included in the elective modules.

All are existing modules.

Credits:20

Overview

Downstream energy law and policy is concerned with the structure and regulation of gas and electricity markets. With the advent of liberalisation, most gas and electricity markets have become semi-competitive. There are regulatory structures to control entry to the market. There are rules on how the producers / generators interact with the suppliers – either bilateral markets or pools. There are rules for producers / generators which get special treatment – frequently state-owned companies and renewable generators. There are measures to control security of supply. There are measures dealing with pass through of costs – and attempts to ensure that the consumer price does not reach unacceptable levels.

The course looks at regulatory structures – the role of government; the role of the independent regulator; the role of the market operator and the transmission system operator. The course looks at the options for structuring liberalised and semi-competitive markets. It looks at measures to reduce investment risks for additional capacity. It recognises that the position of capacity short markets is different from that of markets with capacity excess – even if in the long term, both ultimately want the same thing…cheap and reliable delivery of the commodity.

Module leader

Stephen Dow
Credits:20

Overview

The main objective of the module is to provide an understanding of the main law and policy issues in the international petroleum industry, with an emphasis upon transactional agreements concluded between host government and oil company/investors.

Common and diverging objectives between the two parties and indeed among the international corporate and financial investors themselves are faced in a candid and practical way, with an emphasis upon ways of accommodating the interests of diverse stakeholders in the development of petroleum resources.

A brief introduction is provided to petroleum taxation issues. The module focuses upon problem-solving techniques in a variety of settings, noting the inputs of lawyers, economists, accountants, engineers and geologists.

Module leader

Professor Peter Cameron
Credits:20

Overview

The main objective of the course is to provide an introduction to the fundamental concepts and specific legal and jurisdictional issues in the field of international and transboundary natural resources.

The emphasis is on ensuring a proper understanding of the existing legal mechanisms and international regimes applicable to various types of natural resources located beyond States’ jurisdiction or control.

Module leader

Dr Sergei Vinogradov

Credits: 20

Overview

The aim of this module is to equip students with the economic, technical, and institutional knowledge for understanding the working of the international petroleum industry and to develop students’ capacity in analyzing the economic and policy problems associated with international oil and gas markets. The module is organized along the petroleum product value chain, such as exploration and development, production, refining and marketing, and natural gas monetization. By completing this module, students should have the knowledge and understanding of demand, supply and price dynamics of oil, gas and refined petroleum products and the skills to analyze trends and issues in oil and gas markets and to evaluate petroleum projects, contracts, and policies. The module is designed for an interdisciplinary audience and will not require a background in economics.

Module leader

Dr Xiaoyi (Shawn) Mu

Credits: 20

Overview

The internship provides the student with the opportunity to apply in the workplace the knowledge and skills learnt at CEPMLP and to learn how professionals in the field perform their tasks.

Students who choose this option are required to source an organisation willing to offer a 3-month work placement, approved by an academic supervisor. The Internship includes the submission of a written report as part of the assessment.

The internship requires an intellectual report of approximately 5000 words.

Credits: 40

Overview

The dissertation contributes to the achievement of the aims of the Masters degree namely:- to promote a deeper and critical understanding of selected areas relating to the specialisation of the student; to develop originality of thought and skills of research, analysis, argumentation and expression; to build upon, develop and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired in the taught modules.

A dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a topic approved by an academic supervisor.

Credits:20

Overview

The aim of this module is to develop the student’s critical understanding and application of models, approaches and tools for the management of complex energy and natural resources. The module examines the behaviours, contemporary influences and dilemmas within the practice of management in knowledge intensive organisations.

Module leader

Professor Graeme Martin

Dr Brian Howieson

Dr Evangelia Fragouli

Credits: 10

Overview

The principal aim of this course is to give an appropriate understanding of the published accounts of a company and their underlying principles, so that an effective contribution may be given to the senior financial management of an organisation. Particular emphasis is given to accounts of the extractive industries.

Credits:20

Overview

The module aims to provide an understanding of the regulatory and contractual mechanisms required to make a single jurisdiction work in relation to petroleum law. The emphasis is on providing the student with knowledge and understanding of the differences (and similarities) between regimes based on licences, and those based on production sharing contracts.

All oil and gas law throughout the world is the same at a basic level – international law determines which state is entitled to the resource; the entitled state grants rights to individuals to extract the resource; the individuals agree amongst themselves as to how to split the costs and benefits; there is unitisation if necessary; the production is taxed; pipelines etc are built to move the production; the production is sold; and the facilities are ultimately decommissioned. This module aims to show the different models states adopt to facilitate petroleum production, including showing the role for state companies.

Module leader

Stephen Dow

Credits: 20

Overview

The course deals with selected issues central to understanding international and national environmental policy and law related to production and consumption of natural resources and power generation. It addresses, in particular, environmental problems arising in connection with production and transportation of petroleum (both on-land and offshore), mining activities, use of nuclear energy, including production of uranium and disposal of radioactive wastes, and use of fossil fuels, including transboundary air pollution and global climate effects. A special emphasis is placed on the solutions for environmental problems provided by various national regulatory systems, in particular British and North American.

Module leader

Dr Sergei Vinogradov

Credits:20

Overview

The main objective of this course is to help the students to understand the int’l environments and of the interaction between international relations (IR) and energy and natural resources industry. This module, together with International Political Economy, is being introduced in order to provide an important political element to the MBA, LLM and MSc Programmes in general, and to form an important part of the specification of Geopolitics of Energy in particular.

Module leader

Dr Janet Xuanli Liao

Credits:20

Overview

This module will provide students with foundation knowledge on how taxes and non-tax instruments are used by governments and the extractive industry to promote natural resource development while deriving revenues for the state and profits for extractive firms. Emphasis is on providing an understanding of the complex issues of tax regimes and the skill to analysis current topics or controversies, with the objective of providing competent strategy or policy advice to either governments or resource firms. Students will be prepared to compare and evaluate alternative taxation regimes, including environmental and international tax issues. Some topics covered in the module include; resource rent taxation, royalties, direct and indirect taxes, general structure of PSAs/PSCs, transfer pricing, and current issues from around the world. This module does not teach skills in accounting, financial analysis or tax law.

Module leader

Dr Ariel Bergmann

Credits: 20

Overview

This module aims at introducing participants to main principles and concepts of legal, regulatory and contractual regimes for mining, from international and comparative perspectives and within a sustainable development framework. The focus is on the understanding of ownership and mineral tenure regimes; the interface between mineral tenure regimes, competitive uses of land and environmental regulation; forms and typical clauses of mining agreements; CSR, scope and implications of voluntary regulation; an introduction to underlying conflicts for the regulation of artisanal and small-scale mining; and methods for, and trends on, community engagement in mining projects.

Module leader

Dr Ana Elizabeth Bastida

Credits:20

Overview

The primary aim of the course is to provide a detailed consideration of the theory of finance as it applies to the energy and mining industries and to consider how the theory is applied in practice. The two key focus areas will be investment decision making with uncertainty and how the investment demands are financed.

Module leader

Mr Armando Zamora

Credits: 20

Overview

All too often mineral policies are developed without any proper understanding of the economic forces which influence all aspects of the mineral industries. Unless they work with those forces, rather than against them, policies are doomed to fail, no matter how well-intentioned or desirable they might appear. Whilst the various sectors of the hard-rock mineral industries share common features, each is influenced by different factors. This course explains, in a straightforward and common sense fashion, the main characteristics of the major sectors and the many forces working on demand, supply and prices. It is often overlooked that mining is primarily an economic activity. The lectures and notes bring out the various conflicting aims and objectives of all concerned with the industries and give an overall view of the economic context for all the legal and policy issues facing the minerals industry without becoming unduly enmeshed in whatever is presently of fashionable concern.

Module leader

Professor Phillip Crowson

Credits: 20

Overview

This main aim of the module is to introduce students to the rational for and methods of economic regulation in energy and infrastructure industries, such as the rate-of-return regulation, price-cap regulation and franchise bidding; the issues related to regulation and deregulation; and the reasons for and pathways of restructuring of energy industries. It draws upon recent theoretical and empirical advances in public economics and industrial organization, and is intended to provide students with an analytical framework for regulatory and public policy analysis and a rigorous foundation for further study.

Module leader

Dr Xiaoyi (Shawn) Mu

Credits:20

Overview

This module aims to provide students with practical knowledge and theoretical understanding of corporate social responsibility (CSR) so that students can integrate responsible business practices into all levels of corporate operations. Students will learn to deliver practical solutions to issues in the CSR debate, with learning from case studies, corporate sector experts and academic research.

Module leader

Ms Ayesha Dias

Credits: 20

Overview

The main objective of the course is to provide an inter-disciplinary framework for the strategic analysis of firms and markets in the extractive industries. Drawing on core topics in the MBA curriculum, in particular on the ‘Strategic Management and Organisational Analysis’ module, this module uses the field of corporate strategy to provide a series of opportunities for integrated analysis of strategies applied in the extractive industries.

Module leader

Dr Ian Robson

Dr Brian Howieson

Credit rating: 20

The aim of this module is to provide an understanding of the processes and skills involved in designing, scoping, and managing complex projects within the constraints of time, budget, specification, and customer satisfaction.

Credits: 10

Overview

This module will introduce students to the complexities of business finance and aim to give them an understanding of the basic financial issues business managers in the energy and extractive industries are required to consider in the decision-making process. All managers, in all types of organisations, have to be constantly aware of the financial implications of decisions being made, including sources and cost of finance, return on investment and the effective management of working capital requirements. The module is designed to give students an appreciation of issues of this nature they will confront as managers and to give them the confidence in the understanding of finance to be able to ensure the correct financial information is available to them to allow for well informed decision making.

Module leader

Mr Donald MacLeod

Credits: 20

Overview

On successful completion, a candidate will have an understanding of:

  • the process of creation of the agreements and differences caused by the relative size of the parties
  • the standard forms and master drafting styles for the agreements
  • the linkage between the agreements - the flow of risk and reward

Credit rating:20

The module will develop a critical understanding of the role, responsibilities and competences of leadership with a critical insight into current theory and practice in leadership and decision making processes applicable in business contexts.

Credits:20

Overview

The objective of the module is to enhance students" understanding of the interplay of climate change politics at the international and domestic levels. Employing the Two-Levels game theory as an analytical framework, the module, on the one hand, attempts to reveal the power struggles between the major powers under the Kyoto Protocol, together with the flawed Kyoto system. On the other hand, it looks into domestic factors of the major CO2 emitters, in order to explain the difficult choices facing their leaderships, and the complexity involved in climate change governance.

Module leader

Dr Janet Xuanli Liao

Credits: 20

Overview

Module aims:

  • to develop an understanding of renewable energy resources and the numerous technologies that converts it into useful forms
  • to develop an understanding of the economic issues of renewable energy research, development and deployment at both private and commercial scale
  • to develop an understanding of government and industry policies to encourage the deployment of renewable energy production and use

Module leader

Dr Ariel Bergmann

Credits:20

Overview

The Transatlantic Negotiation Exercise will be carried out between the Masters students at the CEPMLP and the post-graduate students at the Washington College of Law of the American University, International Legal Studies Programme.

The main aim of this module is to provide a formal forum in which using tried and tested methods of international negotiations, in a detailed form, the participants can gain or improve their negotiating skills.

Module leader

Mrs Janeth Warden-Fernandez

Credits: 20

Overview

To enable students to understand the evolving complex practical issues of international arbitration, in the context of both investment relationships between states and foreign investors as well as those between parties to normal commercial contracts, faced by lawyers as counsel to the parties and as arbitrators and to equip them with the necessary skills on how to handle such issues.

Module leader

Professor Pieter Bekker

Credits: 20

Overview

This course has two aims:

  • to develop a solid understanding of the applicability, and application, of multiple sets of legal norms (domestic/international, public/private) to the extractive industries
  • to develop skills for addressing key legal issues facing the extractive industries in the various stages of contracting and investing and the manner in which problems and options can be analysed and addressed

Module leader

Professor Pieter Bekker

Credits:20

Overview

The main objective of this course is to equip students with a basic understanding of statistical concepts, quantitative methods and econometric tools utilized in analysing energy markets. The module will give an introductory overview and practical applications of statistical theories and quantitative methods utilized in analysing energy markets and industry.

 

Credits: 20

Overview

The aims of the module are to convey an economic and institutional knowledge of the electric power sector, and to develop the capacity for analysing the economic and policy issues of the electric power sector. The intended learning outcomes of the module are an understanding of the workings of the electric power industry and its economic fundamentals; and the skills to evaluate power system resources and their implications for competition or regulation. The module is designed for an interdisciplinary audience. It is delivered through lectures, problem sets, and virtual direction. It is assessed through the problem sets, an essay, and an examination. A familiarity with microeconomics principles or numerical techniques is not required but would be helpful.

Module leader

Dr Rafael (Manny) Macatangay

Credits: 20

Overview

The main aim of this module is to provide the students with the legal tools needed for analysing and understanding the structure of transactions and types of agreements commonly encountered in the international mining industry.

This module will enable the students to gain an understanding about the areas of key importance to be considered in a typical mining industry agreements.

The module will also provide the students with an understanding and knowledge of the main considerations involved in drafting and negotiating mining industry agreements.

Credits: 20

Overview

The module is designed to provide students with an understanding of the challenges and opportunities facing countries with major oil, gas and/or mining resources. The course will examine the nature and extent of the “Resource Curse” or “Paradox of Plenty”, technical and political causal factors, possible remedies and the role of different stakeholders in their implementation.

Module leader

Dr Philip Daniel

Our graduates work in the energy sector including international and national oil and gas companies, the financial sector, consultancies and government organisations. Examples of recent employers include CNPC, CNOOC, SINOPEC, Maersk, Phillips 66, Shell, Total; Deloitte, IHS Markit, PwC, Wood Mackenzie; Black Rock, China Development Bank, Africa Development Bank. 

Being at CEPMLP is about more than just accomplishing your studies. It is a powerhouse producing academics and experts in the energy field. 

The quality and breadth of the center, the calibre of the students and professional opportunities provided by CEPMLP’s reputation all exceeded my expectations. 

I encourage prospective energy professionals to consider CEPMLP when choosing their graduate program. 

The stature of professors, international recognition, livability of the city and the surrounding environment certainly stand apart as a knowledge rich environment coupled with continuous guidance and support. 

Alain Kfoury
United Nations and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA)

For entry to CUPB

Academic credentials that equate with a relevant bachelor’s degree in China and at least two recommendation letters issued by associate professors or above.

For entry to Dundee

You should have a good 4-year degree, equivalent to a UK honours degree, preferably at upper 2nd class level or above. Candidates holding the equivalent of a good 2nd class lower degree may also apply. You must provide degree certificates and academic transcripts with your application. Preferred degree disciplines are Law, Economics, Geology, Petroleum or Mining Engineering, Finance.
Work experience in the energy/natural resources industry is an advantage, though it is not a strict requirement for admission to the MSc.
Applicants from CUPB must have 40 eligible credits of the CUPB MSc.

 EU and International qualifications


English Language Requirement

IELTS Overall 6.5
Listening 6.0
Reading 6.0
Writing 6.0
Speaking 6.0

 Equivalent grades from other test providers

 

English Language Programmes

We offer Pre-Sessional and Foundation Programme(s) throughout the year. These are designed to prepare you for university study in the UK when you have not yet met the language requirements for direct entry onto a degree programme.

 Discover our English Language Programmes

The fees you pay will depend on your fee status. Your fee status is determined by us using the information you provide on your application.

 Find out more about fee status

Fee statusFees for students starting academic year 2019-20
Scottish and EU students Year 1 (Beijing) RMB31,000
Year 2 (Dundee) £15,950
Rest of UK students Year 1 (Beijing) RMB31,000
Year 2 (Dundee) £15,950
Overseas students (non-EU) Year 1 (Beijing) RMB31,000
Year 2 (Dundee) £15,950
See our scholarships for International applicants

Additional costs

You may incur additional costs in the course of your education at the University over and above tuition fees in an academic year.

Examples of additional costs:

One off costOngoing costIncidental cost
Graduation feeStudio feeField trips

*these are examples only and are not exhaustive.

Additional costs:

  • may be mandatory or optional expenses
  • may be one off, ongoing or incidental charges and certain costs may be payable annually for each year of your programme of study
  • vary depending on your programme of study
  • are payable by you and are non-refundable and non-transferable

Unfortunately, failure to pay additional costs may result in limitations on your student experience.

For additional costs specific to your course please speak to our Enquiry Team.

Log on to the website http://admission.cup.edu.cn to submit your application. 


Course Contact

Dr Xiaoyi Mu
Centre for Energy, Petroleum and Mineral Law and Policy
X.Mu@dundee.ac.uk
+44 (0)1382 384843