• For Entry: September
  • Duration: 12 months
  • School: Science & Engineering
  • Study Mode: Full Time

Apply engineering principles and design methods to create new techniques and instruments in medicine and surgery.

TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework

The MSc Design for Medical Technologies is aimed at providing the key knowledge and experience to allow you to pursue a career in bioengineering, healthcare or biotechnology. The course will expose you to the leading edge of modern medical and surgical technologies, as well as exploring the role of entrepreneurship, business development and intellectual property exploitation.

The unique environments of medicine and biotechnology offer exacting challenges in the design of high technology products for use in these fields. Engineers and product designers involved in the development of new biomedical instrumentation, surgical tools or biotechnology products must understand the constrictions placed on them by this environment. As a result, bioengineering has been established as the fusion of engineering and ergonomics with a deep understanding of medical science.

Benefits of the programme include:

  • Knowledge and understanding of medical and surgical engineering and technology
  • Skills in research methods, communications, teamwork and management
  • Appreciation of entrepreneurship and the global 'Medtech' industry
  • Participation in research activities of world renowned research groups
  • Preparation for careers in industry, academia and commerce

The University of Dundee is one of the top UK universities, with a powerful research reputation, particularly in the medical and biomedical sciences. It has previously been named Scottish University of the Year and short-listed for the Sunday Times UK University of the year.

The Mechanical Engineering group has a high international research standing with expertise in medical instrumentation, signal processing, biomaterials, tissue engineering, advanced design in minimally invasive surgery and rehabilitation engineering.

Links and research partnerships

We have extensive links and research partnerships with clinicians at Ninewells Hospital (largest teaching hospital in Europe) and with world renowned scientists from the University.

The new Institute of Medical Science and Technology (IMSaT) at the University has been established as a multidisciplinary research 'hothouse' which seeks to commercialise and exploit advanced medical technologies leading to business opportunities.

Who should study this course?

For students with first degrees in an Engineering, Science, Technology or Design, the Design for Medical Technologies MSc offers an advanced qualification in this exciting and expanding sector, applying science and technology to the design of new surgical instruments, analytical equipment, implants and medical materials.

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF)

The University of Dundee has been given a Gold award – the highest possible rating – in the 2017 Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF).

Read more about the Teaching Excellence Framework

TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework

How you will be taught

This course is taught by academics from the School of Science and Engineering & The School of Medicine as well as industrial experts. It will involve a variety of teaching formats including:

  • lectures
  • tutorials
  • VLE screencasts
  • laboratory exercises
  • case studies and demonstrations

Practical sessions are opportunities for you to develop your own prototyping, design critique and usability engineering skills in collaboration with end users.

How you will be assessed

We assess using a mixture of coursework and exams. Coursework will typically be:

  • an individual submission based on a specific topic, related to the taught content
  • a report based on practical work such as laboratory sessions, prototype development
  • the creation of presentations and reflective journals

In addition to exams and coursework, you will be assessed on your biomedical engineering project, by submitting a MSc thesis and preparing a poster presentation as part of a viva-voca thesis defence.

What you will study

The course has six core modules and two optional modules that can be selected during semester one.

Semester 1

Semester 1 has three core modules:

You will be able to know, understand and identify the components and structures of different of the anatomical systems. You will be able to identify major muscles and muscle groups and understand how they act, either alone or in conjunction with others.

Credit rating:

  • 20 credits

Aims to provide you with:

  • A theoretical understanding of the biomechanical characteristics of the human musculoskeletal system at rest and in motion.
  • A working knowledge and appreciation of the mechanics of the cardiovascular system.
  • An understanding of how biomechanical principles are applied to the assessment of human performance, using representative examples.
  • The basis for materials selection in implants, based on biocompatibility and mechanical properties.
  • To develop competence in scientific writing and reporting.

Intended learning outcomes:

  • Knowledge of the mechanical properties of body fluids and living tissues including: bone, skin, tendon, ligament, muscle, cartilage.
  • Able to apply principles of rigid body kinematics and dynamics to understanding of biomechanics.
  • Familiarity with material properties of solids and fluids and materials, biocompatibility and materials selection in implants and surgical instruments.
  • Capability of analysing the effects of external loads and forces on the musculoskeletal system and the soft tissues of the body.
  • Understand how biomechanical principles may be applied in clinical and surgical practice.
  • Competence in writing to accepted academic standards.

Indicative content:

  • Review of basic mechanics: static, dynamic, kinematic and properties of materials.
  • Stress analysis (tension, compression, bending, shear and torsion), structural instability (instability definition, buckling, compressive failure), and dimensional analysis (the scaling process in biomechanics).
  • Mechanical work, energy, kinematics and kinetics applied to musculoskeletal systems, e.g. the knee, walking and running.
  • Fundamentals of fluid dynamics (properties and governing equations of fluids in motion, numerical methods in biofluid mechanics).
  • Biomechanical measurement, testing and manufacturing applications.
  • Applications of biomechanical principles in medicine and surgery.

Assessment:

  • Coursework 30%
  • Exam 70% - 1 written examination of 2 hours duration

Teaching and learning:

  • 70 hours comprising of lectures, tutorials and seminars, case studies, practical laboratory work, demonstrations, etc.; 30 hours of coursework assignments; and 100 hours of self-study (total module hours: 200)

Level:

  • SHE level 5 (MSc) 

Volume:

  • 10 credits

Assessment:

  • Coursework 20%
  • Exam 80%

Aims:

  • To provide a formal training on human anatomy and physiology, medical instrumentation applications and design, medical ethics and safety issues.
  • To provide a grounding in the theory of biomedical measurement systems, including sensors, signal conditioning methods, measurement techniques, patient interfacing and  instrumentation used in biomedicine;
  • To impart the fundamentals of the special aspects of instrumentation design that are required for biomedical instruments;
  • To demonstrate how modern biomedical instruments combine traditional instrumentation techniques and technological innovation, including software presentation and analysis of data.
  • To develop competence in scientific writing and reporting

Intended learning outcomes:        

  • Understand  principles of operation of important sensors used in biomedical instrumentation and measurement
  • Understand the technical specifications of commercially produced sensors  used for this purposes;
  • Be able to specify and design instrumentation and measurement systems that employ these sensors and which, as appropriate, enable safe interface with the human body
  • Recognised and understand the characteristics of the physiological signals being measured;
  • Be able to offer realistic solutions to clinical measurement problems and to justify the choices;
  • Sufficient knowledge in the subject to be able to investigate and evaluate new designs of biomedical sensors and instruments.
  • competence in writing to accepted academic standards

Indicative content:          

  • Physiological quantities, basic concepts and principles of medical instrumentation
  • Bio-potentials, electrodes and amplifiers, static and dynamic characteristics of measurement systems, noise and noise reduction;
  • Measurement constraints in the clinical environment, invasive and non-invasive measurements and medical Imaging;
  • Biomedical and chemical biosensors;
  • Measurement of blood pressure, flow and volume, pulse oximetry and respiratory performance;
  • Clinical laboratory instrumentation, and applications in patient monitoring
  • Protection and safety: medical ethics; mechanical safety; electrical safety; biological hazards; chemical safety; radiation protection. 

Teaching and learning:  

  • A combination of lectures, laboratory experimentation, coursework, including 40 hours of lectures and tutorials, and 60 hours of self-study.

Modes of delivery and student participation:

  • Classes/tutorials and laboratory experiments (face to face teaching).

Optional modules

There are two optional modules during semester 1 and you can select one of the following:

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Professor Annalu Waller

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC51005 " in the heading.


About the Module

AC51005 will have students develop a commercial market understanding that complements technical and computer science knowledge and an understanding of product management. Ultimately, students will have an understanding of the roles of product development and product marketing and the potential career path of product development for engineers.

The module is a mix of case studies, practical exercises and theoretical topics. The theoretical topics will be delivered by business professionals and staff from the University. There will be a number of case studies which will involve entrepreneurs giving a talk about their work, how they develop products for the market, and how they market these. We are hoping that their enthusiasm will ignite the class and provide a unique view of the business world.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1  
2  
3  
4 Introduction to module - Product Management Session 1
5 Project Management Session 2
6 Project Management Session 3
7 Intellectual Property
8 Guest Lectures
9 Project Management Session 4
10 Project Work
11 Project Presentations
12 Revision Week

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Essay 4 9 10 10
Market report and presentation 4 12 50 40

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC51010 " in the heading.


About the Module

This module explores theory in user experience, including design pattern, human factors, and evaluation methods. You will then work in a team to use design and prototyping techniques, creating a user-focussed solution to a given problem.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1  
2  
3  
4 Introduction to UX, whiteboard challenge
5 Stakeholders, Scenarios and Personas, Human Factors
6 Design Patterns, paper prototyping
7 Mobile UX
8 Digital and interactive prototyping, Product Design
9 Whiteboard challenge
10 Evaluation of design and interaction, Introduction to Service Design
11 Interactive prototype demonstrations
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 60% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 40% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Design report 5 7 20 20
Interactive prototype 8 11 30 30
Report 8 9 10 10

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Semester 2

Semester 2 has two taught core modules:

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC52013" in the heading.


About the Module

This module explores key concepts in Human Computer Interaction through practical tasks and critical evaluation of the research literature. This includes elements of the history and development of HCI, mobile HCI, situational impairments, review of published research papers, and a quantitative experiment to assess the quality of an interface.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 History of HCI
2 Presentations
3 Interaction Elements
4 Quantitative Methods
5 Experimental Design
6 Data
7 Statistical Analysis
8 Mobile HCI & Situational Impairments
9 Current Trends in HCI
10 Revision
11 Revision
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark. 
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark. 


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Presentation 1 2 20 20
Paper Discussion 3 5 10 10
Experiment Report 5 9 20 20

Reading List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr. Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC52044" in the heading.


About the Module

Research Frontiers is a final year module which runs in the second semester. In this module, you will be exposed to highly focused areas of leading edge research in computing. You will gain a detailed understanding of computing research topics, which developing transferable skills connected with approaches to research and advanced development.

AC52044 is a 10 credit module. It consists of two blocks; from which you will select topics to study. You will select a total of two units, one from the first block and one from the second block.The topics available will be indicated to

The topics available will be indicated to you in a presentation at the end of semester 1. These will be drawn from the research expertise within computing.Note: For students on the MSc Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Note: For students on the MSc Augmentative and Alternative Communication programme, you will take (Block 1) Assistive Technology and (Block 2) Augmentative and Alternative Communication.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered

1

Block 1

2

Block 1

3

Block 1

4

Block 1

5

Block 1

6

Block 2

7

Block 2

8

Block 2

9

Block 2

10

Block 2

11

 

12

 


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

Assignments will be made available within each option. The total coursework mark for each option is worth 50% of your overall grade.


Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Biomedical Engineering Project.

You will also complete:

Level:

  • SHE level 5 (MSc)

Volume:

  • 90 credits

Aims:

  • To provide an opportunity to develop skills in research, investigative methods and design in an area of biomedical engineering of interests;
  • To develop a high level of competence in a particular biomedical engineering topic;
  • To develop in  the  conduct  of  a  project  requiring  individual responsibility and initiative;
  • To provide guidance in working independently on a project;
  • To develop and improve skills in project planning and implementation, team working and communication with peers and experts.

Intended learning outcomes:

  • Able to establish a testable hypothesis  or project aim (objective) within a biomedical engineering context.
  • Competence in project management including planning, scheduling and resource identification.
  • Mastery of a complex and specialised area of knowledge and skill, including the ability to undertake a critical review of the published literature.
  • Competence in conducting a research project, including designing and executing a significant piece of independent research work to test a hypothesis or achieve a project aim.
  • Ability to analyse, evaluate and appraise experimental results.
  • Competence in writing to accepted academic standards.
  • Competence in delivering a presentation to a professional standard.
  • Confidence in oral defence of original work.
  • Skill in self-management, independent learning, critical thinking, problem-solving and communication, team working.      

The module comprises of:

  • a project selected by the student in consultation with project supervisors;
  • preparation of an interim report, summarising the main aims of the project, research strategy and literature review related to the project;
  • a thesis

The process requires you to:

  • Define agreed project objectives. Projects will generally be part of a larger group research activity and will require the student to work as a team member.
  • Identify appropriate techniques, project structure and timetable.
  • Undertake a literature review.
  • Produce an interim report summarising and reviewing the literature on the project topic.
  • Undertake a period of research or development work, or  a combination of both, according to the project type.
  • Attend regular progress meetings with the project supervisor.
  • Describe the project in its entirety in a written dissertation that complies with academic publishing conventions and presents a critical analysis of the results or findings, draws conclusions and make recommendations for further work.
  • Prepare a poster on the work.
  • Prepare and deliver a presentation as part of the viva voce.

Teaching and learning:

  • Students are expected to be self-motivated in conducting their project, enhancing their technical competence and building self- sufficiency.
  • Supervisors will provide support and guidance.
  • There will be a total of 900 module hours.

When taught:

  • Semester 2.

Modes of delivery & student participation:

  • Supervised MSc research project.

This course will prepare you for a successful, rewarding and challenging career in different sectors. Including the medical technology industry, academic institutions, hospitals and government departments.

A wide range of employment possibilities exist including engineer, professor, research scientist, teacher, manager, salesperson or CEO.

You could also go on to undertake a PhD degree leading to a career in academic research

The normal entry requirement is an honours degree or equivalent qualification in a discipline that provides a suitable basis for the course (e.g. mechanical, biomedical, electrical or electronic engineering, physics or mathematics) or design graduates whose first degree contained an acceptable science or engineering element. Students with other academic backgrounds should contact the programme director to make further enquiries and to discuss their individual cases.

 EU and International qualifications


English Language Requirement

IELTS Overall 6.0
Listening 5.5
Reading 5.5
Writing 6.0
Speaking 5.5

 Equivalent grades from other test providers

 

English Language Programmes

We offer Pre-Sessional and Foundation Programme(s) throughout the year. These are designed to prepare you for university study in the UK when you have not yet met the language requirements for direct entry onto a degree programme.

 Discover our English Language Programmes

The fees you pay will depend on your fee status. Your fee status is determined by us using the information you provide on your application.

 Find out more about fee status

Fee statusFees for students starting 2018-19
Scottish and EU students £6,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for UK/EU applicants
Rest of UK students £6,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for UK/EU applicants
Overseas students (non-EU) £19,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for international applicants

You apply for this course via the UCAS Postgraduate (UKPASS) website which is free of charge. You can check the progress of your application online and you can also make multiple applications.

You'll need to upload relevant documents as part of your application. Please read the How to Apply page before you apply to find out about what you'll need.

  Degree Course Code
Apply NowDesign for Healthcare & Assistive Technologies MScP037305

Course Contact

Dr Zhihong Huang
Science and Engineering
z.y.huang@dundee.ac.uk
+44 (0)1382 385477

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