• For Entry: January | September
  • Duration: 12 months
  • School: Science & Engineering
  • Study Mode: Full Time

Apply engineering principles and design methods to create new techniques and instruments in medicine and surgery.

TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework

The programme is a full-time taught postgraduate degree course leading to the degree of MSc in Biomedical Engineering. It has an international dimension, providing an important opportunity for postgraduate engineers to study the principles and state-of-the-art technologies in biomedical engineering with a particular emphasis on applications in advanced instrumentation for medicine and surgery.

Biomedical engineers apply engineering principles and design methods to improve our understanding of living systems and to create new techniques and instruments in medicine and surgery.

The taught modules in this course expose students to the leading edge of modern medical and surgical technologies. The course also provides concepts and understanding of the role of entrepreneurship, business development and intellectual property exploitation in the biomedical industry, with case examples.

The research project allows students to work in a research area of their own particular interest, learning skills in presentation, critical thinking and problem-solving. Project topics are offered to students during the first semester of the course.

Links with Universities in China

This course can be taken in association with partner universities in China with part of the course taken at the home institution before coming to Dundee to complete your studies. For students from elsewhere it is possible to take the entire course at Dundee.

The University of Dundee has had an active research programme in biomedical engineering for over 20 years.

The Biomedical Engineering group has a high international research standing with expertise in medical instrumentation, signal processing, biomaterials, tissue engineering, advanced design in minimally invasive surgery and rehabilitation engineering.

Research partnerships

We have extensive links and research partnerships with clinicians at Ninewells Hospital (largest teaching hospital in Europe) and with world renowned scientists from the University. The new Institute of Medical Science and Technology (IMSaT) at the University has been established as a multidisciplinary research 'hothouse' which seeks to commercialise and exploit advanced medical technologies leading to business opportunities.

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF)

The University of Dundee has been given a Gold award – the highest possible rating – in the 2017 Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF).

Read more about the Teaching Excellence Framework

TEF Gold - Teaching Excellence Framework

How you will be taught

The structure of the MSc course is divided into two parts. The taught modules expose students to the leading edge of modern biomedical and surgical technologies. The course gives concepts and understanding of the role of entrepreneurship, business development and intellectual property exploitation in the biomedical industry, with case examples.

The research project allows students to work in a research area of their own particular interest, learning skills in presentation, critical thinking and problem-solving. Project topics are offered to students towards at the beginning of second semester of the course.

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework and examination, plus dissertation.

What you will study

Credit rating       Level      SHE level 5 (MSc)              Volume 20 credits

Aims      To provide the student with:

•             Knowledge of biomaterials in particular of applications in tissue engineering and biocompatibility.

•             Knowledge of interaction between biological systems and prosthetic materials during tissue regeneration.

•             An understanding of the physiological effects of exercise;

•             Experience in computer modelling of biomechanical properties of tissue;

•             A basic understanding of natural biomaterials

•             An introduction to bioreactors;

•             Knowledge of the basic properties of implant materials and the way in which these influence their biocompatibility

•             To develop competence in scientific writing and reporting

Intended learning outcomes        

•             knowledge of the mechanical properties of body fluids and living tissue including: bone, skin, tendon, ligament, muscle, cartilage;

•             familiarity with material properties of solids and fluids

•             selection criteria for suitable materials;

•             able to apply knowledge to specific implant design problems

•             knowledge of modern biomaterials in medicine and surgery;

•             Knowledge of medical application of smart materials and structures.

•             competence in writing to accepted academic standards

Indicative content            •             elastic, viscoelastic and fatigue material properties:;

•             material properties specific to  biological (bone, soft tissues) and non-biological (metals, plastics, ceramics);

•             Gradients and junctions of connective tissue;

•             Biomaterials (properties and applications), and biocompatibility (tissue response to the biomaterials, biomechanical compatibility, assessment of biocompatibility and Imaging compatibility).

•             Biocompatibility of implant materials and tissue engineering constructs

Assessment         Coursework (%) 30           Exam (%)             70

               No. & duration of  exam(s)            1 written examination of 2 hours duration.

Teaching &  learning       70 hours comprising of lectures, tutorials and seminars, case studies, practical laboratory work, demonstrations, etc.; 30 hours of coursework assignments; and 100 hours of self-study (total module hours: 200)

When taught     Semester 1

Modes of delivery & student participation              Modes of delivery: Classes/tutorials (face to face teaching). Students are expected and encouraged to participate actively in classes via discussions, teamwork and feedback.

Pre-requisites of entry requirements         The normal entry requirement will be an honours degree or equivalent in a discipline that provides a suitable basis for the programme, e.g. biomedical, electrical, electronic or mechanical engineering.

Accessibility for students with disability    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/disabilityservices/disability/statement.htm

Corequisites        None

Antirequisites     None

 

Credit rating       Level      SHE level 5 (MSc)              Volume 10 credits

Aims     

•             To provide a formal training on human anatomy and physiology, medical instrumentation applications and design, medical ethics and safety issues.

•             To provide a grounding in the theory of biomedical measurement systems, including sensors, signal conditioning methods, measurement techniques, patient interfacing and  instrumentation used in biomedicine;

•             To impart the fundamentals of the special aspects of instrumentation design that are required for biomedical instruments;

•             To demonstrate how modern biomedical instruments combine traditional instrumentation techniques and technological innovation, including software presentation and analysis of data.

•             To develop competence in scientific writing and reporting

Intended learning outcomes        

•             Understand  principles of operation of important sensors used in biomedical instrumentation and measurement

•             Understand the technical specifications of commercially produced sensors  used for this purposes;

•             Be able to specify and design instrumentation and measurement systems that employ these sensors and which, as appropriate, enable safe interface with the human body

•             Recognised and understand the characteristics of the physiological signals being measured;

•             Be able to offer realistic solutions to clinical measurement problems and to justify the choices;

•             Sufficient knowledge in the subject to be able to investigate and evaluate new designs of biomedical sensors and instruments.

•             competence in writing to accepted academic standards

Indicative content           

•             Physiological quantities, basic concepts and principles of medical instrumentation

•             Bio-potentials, electrodes and amplifiers, static and dynamic characteristics of measurement systems, noise and noise reduction;

•             Measurement constraints in the clinical environment, invasive and non-invasive measurements and medical Imaging;

•             Biomedical and chemical biosensors;

•             Measurement of blood pressure, flow and volume, pulse oximetry and respiratory performance;

•             Clinical laboratory instrumentation, and applications in patient monitoring

•             Protection and safety: medical ethics; mechanical safety; electrical safety; biological hazards; chemical safety; radiation protection.

 

Assessment         Coursework (%) 20           Exam (%)             80

No. & duration of  exam(s)            1 written examination of 2 hours duration

Teaching &  learning       Combination of lectures, laboratory experimentation, coursework, including 40 hours of lectures and tutorials, and 60 hours of self-study (total module hours: 100)

When taught     Semester 1

Modes of delivery & student participation              Classes/tutorials and laboratory experiments (face to face teaching).  Students are expected and encouraged to participate actively in classes via discussions, teamwork and feedback

Pre-requisites of entry requirements         The normal entry requirement will be an honours degree or equivalent in a discipline that provides a suitable basis for the programme, e.g. biomedical, electrical, electronic or mechanical engineering.

Accessibility for students with disability    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/disabilityservices/disability/statement.htm

Corequisites        None

Antirequisites     None

Credit rating       Level      SHE level 5 (MSc)              Volume 20 credits

Aims     

•             Through the use of case studies based on real devices and their commercial development routes to strengthen and broaden understanding of concepts taught in the core modules of the course;

•             To give students a sound theoretical knowledge and practical awareness of leading edge technologies used in modern medical and surgical instruments and devices;

•             To develop in students the skills required for real biomedical problem identification and solving;

•             To stimulate and encourage students to apply engineering theories and principles to address biomedical problems and to be familiar with research methods;

•             To provide a basic understanding of the process of invention and its management; an introduction to entrepreneurship and its interface with invention; product development and its relationship to invention, resultant intellectual property and entrepreneurship.

•             To develop competence in scientific writing and reporting

•             To develop team working skills

 

Intended learning outcomes        

•             Expanding the understanding of the concepts and theories given in the core modules and awareness of their context in modern medical and surgical instrumentation;

•             A deep understanding and broad knowledge of biomedical technologies, most especially those included in the Indicative Content section below;

•             A sound knowledge of new and emerging technologies that maybe used to improve the function of medical and surgical instruments and devices;

•             An awareness of unmet needs in medical diagnosis and treatment

•             have knowledge of the research and engineering methods applied in the development of biomedical and surgical instrumentation;

•             knowledge of how to apply concepts and theories to solve biomedical problems, to develop advanced and innovative biomedical and surgical instrumentation;

•             basic knowledge and understanding of the inventive process and its management, the entrepreneurial basis of business development; exploitation and value of Intellectual Property particularly relating to the biomedical industry.

•             competence in writing to accepted academic standards

•             Team working skills

 

Indicative content           

•             Modern biomaterials in medicine and surgery;

•             Smart materials and structures in medical applications;

•             Micro-engineering in medicine;

•             Powered surgical instrument technology;

•             Minimally invasive instrumentation;

•             Advanced diagnostic signal processing;

•             The medical device industry;

•             Medical devices design, development & commercialisation processes

•             Regulatory process

 

Assessment         Coursework (%) 30           Exam (%)             70

No. & duration of  exam(s)            1 written examination of 3 hours duration

Teaching &  learning       Combination of lectures, case study seminars, coursework, including 70 hours of lectures, tutorials and seminars, 40 hours of coursework assignments, 190 hours of self-study (total module hours: 300)

When taught     Semester 2

Modes of delivery & student participation              Classes/tutorials (face to face teaching). Students are expected and encouraged to participate actively in classes via discussions, teamwork and feedback.

Pre-requisites of entry requirements

Accessibility for students with disability    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/disabilityservices/disability/statement.htm

Corequisites        None

Antirequisites     None

 

Credit rating       Level      SHE level 5 (MSc)              Volume 90 credits

Aims     

•             To provide an opportunity to develop skills in research, investigative methods and design in an area of biomedical engineering of interests;

•             To develop a high level of competence in a particular biomedical engineering topic;

•             To develop in  the  conduct  of  a  project  requiring  individual responsibility and initiative;

•             To provide guidance in working independently on a project;

•             To develop and improve skills in project planning and implementation, team working and communication with peers and experts.

 

Intended learning outcomes        

•             Able to establish a testable hypothesis  or project aim (objective) within a biomedical engineering context;

•             competence in project management including planning, scheduling and resource identification;

•             mastery of a complex and specialised area of knowledge and skill, including the ability to undertake a critical review of the published literature;

•             competence in conducting a research project, including designing and executing a significant piece of independent research work to test a hypothesis or achieve a project aim;

•             ability to analyse, evaluate and appraise experimental results;

•             competence in writing to accepted academic standards

•             competence in delivering a presentation to a professional standard

•             confidence in oral defence of original work;

•             skill in self-management, independent learning, critical thinking, problem-solving and communication, team working.

 

Indicative content           
The module comprises of:

•             a project selected by the student in consultation with project supervisors;

•             preparation of an interim report, summarising the main aims of the project, research strategy and literature review related to the project;

•             a thesis

 

The process requires students to:

•             Define agreed project objectives. Projects will generally be part of a larger group research activity and will require the student to work as a team member

•             Identify appropriate techniques, project structure and timetable;

•             Undertake a literature review.

•             Produce an interim report summarising and reviewing the literature on the project topic.

•             Undertake a period of research or development work, or  a combination of both, according to the project type;

•             Attend regular progress meetings with the project supervisor;

•             Describe the project in its entirety in a written dissertation that complies with academic publishing conventions and presents a critical analysis of the results or findings, draws conclusions and make recommendations for further work

•             Prepare a poster on the work

•             Prepare and deliver a presentation as part of the viva voce.

 

Assessment         Coursework (%) Nil          Exam (%)             100

No. & duration of  exam(s)            Poster presentation

1 oral (viva voce) up to 45 min including 10 min presentation

 Teaching &  learning       Students are expected to be self-motivated in conducting their project, enhancing their technical competence and building self- sufficiency.

Supervisors will provide support and guidance. There will be a total of 900 module hours.

When taught     Semester 2 on

Modes of delivery & student participation              Supervised MSc research project.

Pre-requisites of entry requirements        

Accessibility for students with disability    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/disabilityservices/disability/statement.htm

Corequisites        None

Antirequisites     None

Credit rating       Level      SHE level 5 (MSc)              Volume 30 credits

Aims     

•             To provide a grounding in the theory of relevant biomedical measurement systems including sensors, signal acquisition and conditioning principles, measurement techniques and instrumentation and detectors;

•             To impart the basic theory and physiological interactions of medical imaging modalities (including microscopy, endoscopy, x-ray, ultrasound, CT, MRI, PET and IR) and review applications and image-guided interventions;

•             To teach the basic physiological and anatomical principles of surgical interventions, interventional radiology and how the imaging objectives relate to disease and treatment

•             To review the working principles of existing surgical technology including robotics and how this addresses the surgical intent, including current minimal access techniques and understand the implications for image guidance.

•             To provide a basic understanding of the process of invention and its management; an introduction to entrepreneurship and its interface with invention; product development and its relationship to invention, resultant intellectual property and entrepreneurship

 

Intended learning outcomes        

•             Understand the principles of operation of  relevant sensors and detectors used in biomedical measurement for imaging and their technical specifications;

•             Be able to apply a range of signal analysis and signal processing methods ;

•             Understand how medical imaging systems work, how they interact with the tissue, how their images can be interpreted and the limitations of their application;

•             Be familiar with a range of medical imaging applications for different pathologies, including cellular, molecular imaging and interventions;

•             Know how image guidance interacts and operates with instruments and equipment in surgical intervention including robotics. Understand the equipment and instruments required and how it is use.

•             Understand the requirements in quality spatial, contrast and time resolution of imaging modalities used for different outcomes.

•             have knowledge of the research and engineering methods applied in the development of medical imaging;

•             Basic knowledge and understanding of the inventive process and its management, the entrepreneurial basis of business development; exploitation and value of Intellectual Property.

 

Indicative content           

•             Physiologic quantities, basic concepts and principles of medical imaging instrumentation;

•             Signal types, measurement and sensor system properties, transfer functions, Fourier analysis, spectral analysis and filtering theory

•             Characteristics of detection systems, amplification, noise/noise reduction and biomedical sensor and detector types;

•             Measurement constraints in the physical environment

•             Principles and exemplar applications of x-ray and CT imaging;

•             Principles and exemplar applications of Nuclear and PET imaging

•             Principles of MRI imaging, MRI applications and MRI-guided interventions, MRI safety;

•             Current and future  developments of medical optical and photonics imaging, fluorescence, confocal, single/multiphoton, Raman, NIR;

•             Overview of diagnostic and interventional ultrasound and review of likely future developments;

•             Introduction to the objectives and practice of clinical diagnostic imaging;

•             Introduction to interventional principles, overview of instrumentation and devices, open, minimally invasive and image guided surgery.

Assessment         Coursework (%) 30           Exam (%)             70

No. & duration of  exam(s)            1 written examination of 3 hours duration.

Teaching &  learning       100 hours comprising of lectures, tutorials and seminars, case studies, practical laboratory work, demonstrations, etc.; 40 hours of coursework assignments; and 160 hours of self-study (total module hours: 300)

When taught     Semester 2

Modes of delivery & student participation              Modes of delivery: Classes/tutorials laboratory experiments (face to face teaching). Students are expected and encouraged to participate actively in classes via discussions, teamwork and feedback. Visit of clinical sites and interaction with clinicians.

Pre-requisites of entry requirements         The normal entry requirement will be an honours degree or equivalent in a discipline that provides a suitable basis for the programme, e.g. biomedical, electrical, electronic or mechanical engineering.

Accessibility for students with disability    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/disabilityservices/disability/statement.htm

Corequisites        None

Antirequisites     None

An MSc degree in Biomedical Engineering will prepare you for a challenging and rewarding career in one of many sectors: the rapidly growing medical technology industry, academic institutions, hospitals and government departments.

A wide range of employment possibilities exist including engineer, professor, research scientist, teacher, manager, salesperson or CEO.

The programme also provides the ideal academic grounding to undertake a PhD degree leading to a career in academic research.

Xiaoxu Lei, MSc Biomedical Engineering

“Keyhole surgery was pioneered here in Dundee, so when it came to choosing where to study for my postgraduate in Biomedical Engineering, there really was nowhere else I wanted to go – it had to be Dundee. I was also attracted to the close relationship that the University has with Ninewells hospital, one of the largest teaching hospitals in Europe. This connection provides valuable real-life hospital work experience which is essential to studying Biomedical Engineering.”

The normal entry requirement is a four-year Bachelor's degree or equivalent qualification in a discipline that provides a suitable basis for the course, e.g. biomedical, electrical, electronic or mechanical engineering, physics or mathematics. Students with other academic backgrounds or exceptional work experience in the chosen field, should contact the Course Director to make further enquiries and to discuss their individual cases.

 EU and International qualifications


English Language Requirement

IELTS Overall 6.0
Listening 5.5
Reading 5.5
Writing 6.0
Speaking 5.5

 Equivalent grades from other test providers

 

English Language Programmes

We offer Pre-Sessional and Foundation Programme(s) throughout the year. These are designed to prepare you for university study in the UK when you have not yet met the language requirements for direct entry onto a degree programme.

 Discover our English Language Programmes

The fees you pay will depend on your fee status. Your fee status is determined by us using the information you provide on your application.

 Find out more about fee status

Fee statusFees for students starting 2017-18
Scottish and EU students £5,950 per year of study
Rest of UK students £5,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for UK/EU applicants
Overseas students (non-EU) £17,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for international applicants
Fee statusFees for students starting 2018-19
Scottish and EU students £6,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for UK/EU applicants
Rest of UK students £6,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for UK/EU applicants
Overseas students (non-EU) £19,950 per year of study
See our scholarships for international applicants

You apply for this course via the UCAS Postgraduate (UKPASS) website which is free of charge. You can check the progress of your application online and you can also make multiple applications.

You'll need to upload relevant documents as part of your application. Please read the How to Apply page before you apply to find out about what you'll need.

  Degree Course Code
Apply NowBiomedical Engineering MScP037303

Course Contact

Dr Zhihong Huang
Science and Engineering
z.y.huang@dundee.ac.uk
+44 (0)1382 385477