Browse modules

all modules starting September 2018 starting January 2019 starting May 2019

We offer a wide variety of single modules for continuing professional development.

Undergraduate

This module examines digitisation and digital preservation in the heritage sector. Digitisation and digital preservation are often considered as predominantly technical subjects, though really the technology is only a supporting vehicle: content is at the heart of any digitisation or digital preservation initiative. This module looks at specifically at creation and preservation of digital content in the context of archives and other heritage organisations. We start with a consideration of different types of digital collections and a discussion of how they differ from traditional physical content, before moving on to look at the detail of digitisation and digital preservation practices.

By the end of the module you should:

  • understand the relationship between digitisation and digital preservation
  • be able to design and implement a basic digitisation and digital preservation programme
  • understand how the nature of a digital collection can impact on selection of an appropriate technical digital preservation strategy

Tasks and Assignments

Throughout the module you will be asked to complete a series of tasks. Some of these you will do on your own and some of them you will send to me (these are assessed). I will say clearly in the module when you need to send a task to me. These are also listed in the Task Timetable on the course menu. Please look at this now to see when your first task is due. These assessed tasks will account for 40% of your final mark. At the end of the module you will be expected to do a final assignment, please look at the Assignments section on the course menu for more details. There are several discussion board tasks in the module. These will not be marked and you should not write a lot for these. We are looking for informal discussion and do not want you to spend a lot of time worrying about wording when you post to the discussion board. If you do not participate in the discussions you will be marked down.

Useful Information

You should aim to spend at least 15 hours a week on the module, or 100 hours over the 7 weeks that the module lasts.

This module equals to 10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS credits) on Level 3, SHE 3 (SCQF 9).

Tutor

Melinda Haunton

Want to learn more about our courses? 

Contact CAIS

This module provides a basic introduction to the management and preservation of archives. Archives play an important, indeed a vital, role in society. They contribute to history but, as we shall see, they are essential for other reasons as well. Imagine what would happen if all the archives in the world were destroyed. How would individuals, organisations and societies function? Much of what we remember, and what contributes to our sense of who we are and what is important, depends on documents and other primary sources kept by archives. Businesses and other organisations depend on archives to make current decisions. Archives provide evidence of what our governments have done and serve to protect our rights as citizens.

This module examines the reasons why archives are important, why they are created, kept and used. It also looks at the role of the archivist, examining the core functions that archivists undertake, the skills that are required and the policies and procedures that they create and follow.

By the end of the module you should:

  • understand the key skills and tasks required to undertake basic management and preservation of archives
  • have a knowledge of the reasons why archives are kept and the theoretical discussions on how they should be kept
  • be able to place this knowledge in a broader context
  • develop and build skills which can be transferred to the workplace

Module Structure

The module is split into six units, which are described below.

  • An introduction to theory and practice
  • Collecting, accessioning and appraisal
  • Arrangement and description
  • Preservation
  • Access
  • Collections management 

Tasks and Assignments

Throughout the module you will be asked to complete a series of tasks. Some of these you will do on your own and some of them you will send to me (these are assessed). I will say clearly in the module when you need to send a task to me. These are also listed in the Task Timetable on the course menu. Please look at this now to see when your first task is due. These assessed tasks will account for 40% of your final mark. At the end of the module you will be expected to do a final assignment, please look at the Assignments section on the course menu for more details. There are several discussion board tasks in the module. These will not be marked and you should not write a lot for these. We are looking for informal discussion and do not want you to spend a lot of time worrying about wording when you post to the discussion board. If you do not participate in the discussions you will be marked down

Useful Information

You should aim to spend at least 15 hours a week on the module, or 100 hours over the 7 weeks that the module lasts.

This module equals to 10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS credits) on Level 3, SHE 3 (SCQF 9).

Want to learn more about our courses? 

Contact CAIS

This module examines dissemination in the heritage sector. The module looks at outreach and education in the context of archives and other heritage organisations. We start with a consideration of the role of heritage and a discussion of the importance of archives before moving on to look at different outreach activities.

Archives, museums and other heritage institutions play an important, indeed a vital, role in society but are often misunderstood, ignored and under used. What influences dissemination in this context? How should we approach and manage outreach and education activities? What is the best way to attract new user groups and how do we know if our efforts are successful? Why is dissemination important? These are key questions for anyone interested in working in a heritage environment and we will try to answer these over the next few weeks.

By the end of the module you should:

  • understand why archives are important and how they can be used for different purposes and by different audience
  • be able to design and implement basic outreach and education activities using archival collections
  • understand how the dissemination of archives fits into the broader context
  • develop and build skills which can be transferred to the workplace

Module Structure

The module is split into six units, which are described below.

  • An introduction to dissemination
  • Dissemination and outreach activities
  • Practical outreach
  • Online resources
  • Oral history
  • Managing dissemination

Tasks and Assignments

Throughout the module you will be asked to complete a series of tasks. Some of these you will do on your own and some of them you will send to me (these are assessed). I will say clearly in the module when you need to send a task to me. These are also listed in the Task Timetable on the course menu. Please look at this now to see when your first task is due. These assessed tasks will account for 40% of your final mark. At the end of the module you will be expected to do a final assignment, please look at the Assignments section on the course menu for more details. There are several discussion board tasks in the module. These will not be marked and you should not write a lot for these. We are looking for informal discussion and do not want you to spend a lot of time worrying about wording when you post to the discussion board. If you do not participate in the discussions you will be marked down.

Useful Information

You should aim to spend at least 15 hours a week on the module, or 100 hours over the 7 weeks that the module lasts.

This module equals to 10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS credits) on Level 3, SHE 3 (SCQF 9).

The module is running in January

Want to learn more about our courses? 

Contact CAIS

Postgraduate

In Archive Services, Access and Preservation, we will be utilising professional UK and International standards and best practice, to study the complex balancing act of making unique archives available to users, whilst ensuring their preservation. We will consider the services users require, explore barriers to access, and discuss how we can facilitate and increase use. We will review the best ways to promote our collections, looking at websites, digitisation, outreach, publicity and educational activities. We will examine immediate and potential threats to the preservation of archives and consider practical ways in which these can be removed. Finally we will consider resource management, how best to manage time, staff and other resources to ensure that our responsibilities to users, archives and managers are met. Throughout the module we will be mixing theory with practice, looking at not just what we do but why we do it and looking at how standards and guidelines can best be applied in practice.

  • Users and access: providing services to users; users and their needs; access restrictions and regulations; legislation
  • Outreach: reaching a wider audience; publicity and promotion; online resources; outreach and inreach strategies;
  • Preservation: identifying risks to archives; responses to ensure protection of archives; storage requirements of different media; preservation policies
  • Management: staff, resource and time management; policies and procedures; measuring performance

Module code

RM50001

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutors

Caroline BrownAlex Du ToitCraig Gauld

This module is about the principles and practice of records management and the broader discipline of 'recordkeeping'.  It looks at what records are and why they need to be 'managed', examines records management concepts and discusses the foundations for, and the key elements of, a records management programme.  In this module, you will be able to draw on what you have learned in any other core modules which you have already completed.  You will also be expected to draw on your own experience of records, whether or not you have worked in any area of 'recordkeeping'.

Main topics:

  • Organisations and records: nature of records; making, maintaining and managing records
  • Records management concepts: record life cycle; records continuum
  • Records management programmes – foundations: records management roles & responsibilities; records management policies; records systems development methodology; business analysis; records survey
  • Records management programmes – elements: records creation & capture; records classification; records storage; records retention; records destruction
  • Establishing a records management programme: developing a business case for a records management programme; selling records management

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Durham Burt, Tim Lovering, Meic Pierce-Owen

In the Scottish Palaeography and Diplomatic module we shall study the different styles of handwriting to be found in Scottish documents from the early 1500s up to the 18th century, and will also consider the form of many different classes of document. These will include those relating to conveyancing and the recording of title, inheritance and legal dispute. This module has a strongly practical emphasis and aims to ensure that you become confident in reading the different styles of handwriting which have been used in Scotland and that you feel equipped to try to read any document you might be faced with.

  • Becoming familiar with the handwriting used in Scotland between 1500 and 1800
  • Recognising particular letter forms and abbreviations common in handwritten Scots documents
  • Discovering the form of common types of documents used in Scotland to do with conveyancing, registration, wills and settlements and legal processes
  • Learning more about Scottish peculiarities in personal names, reckonings of time, numbers, coinage and weights and measures
  • Practising the reading and interpretation of real sources for local and family history with close help from a personal tutor

Module code

RM50007

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Rachel HartMorag Fyfe-Lucas

This module explores many of the sources that inform research about family and local history in Scotland.  It introduces the context of the local administrative and legal framework in Scotland and the functions of local authorities which generated these records. It helps you discover how these records can be used to pursue interests in local history and family history.

After an introduction to the network of archives in Scotland and the location of sources, the module will explore the use of the following sources for family and local history

  • Local administration records
  • Local financial and fiscal records
  • Local education, health and welfare records
  • Church and civil courts and police records
  • Deeds
  • Legal records relating to land, property and inheritance
  • Maps, plans, and other records of buildings, roads, ships and harbours
  • Trade and business records
  • Records of estates, families and clubs and societies

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Elspeth Reid

In the Complying with Information Legislation module we look at the requirements of information legislation, particularly the general data protection regulations, the freedom of information acts and the environmental information regulations.  The module looks at the background to information legislation in the UK, the requirements of the three key pieces of information legislation, practical ways of meeting these requirements and the implications of the legislation for archivists, which provides an interesting way to look at some of the practical application of the legislation.  The module will not only give you an understanding of current theory and practice in the field, but also develops the critical analysis skills necessary to keep your knowledge up-to-date in future practice.

  • The international and national context of information legislation in the UK
  • The requirements of the general data protection regulations, the freedom of information acts and the environmental information regulations, and how to meet them in practice
  • The implications of information legislation for archivists - an examination of the practical application of the legislation
  • Management and organisational frameworks for implementing information legislation

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Durham Burt

In the Skills and Sources for Family and Local History in England module, we shall study various sources and classes of records kept at county and national Record Offices from the 16th to 20th centuries. This will help you become familiar with the variety of sources available for local and family history research and how they can be used. This module has a strong practical emphasis, encouraging students to study and interpret primary source material, building up confidence to use some of these sources in personal research.

  • Introduction to the wide variety of sources available in County Record Offices and National Archives
  • Highlights what sources are available for local and family history research topics including poor law and education
  • Raises awareness of the content and form of various sources including criminal and inheritance records.
  • Historical context of the sources
  • Overview of how sources can be used for local and family history research
  • Learning to develop critical analysis skills to interpret sources

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Linda BankierClaire SkinnerSue Wood 

In the Cataloguing in a Digital Age module we take a look at how archivists have embraced technology – from the early cataloguing systems through to online networks and the opportunities offered by Web 2.0 and the impact of technology on the evolution and impact of cataloguing standards including ISAD(G) and EAD. We will look at a range of options for publishing collections information online, consider indexing practices, the challenges and opportunities of born-digital archives, the impact of user needs and expectations and how social media can be used effectively to engage audiences. The module combines a strong practical element with reflection on current practices and introduces students to the issues being faced across the archive sector.

  1. How have archivists embraced technology – in terms of software tools but also as an enabler
  2. How the development of cataloguing standards have had an impact on the way in which archivists and archive services work
  3. The impact of the world wide web as a platform for archive services to publish and share information about collections
  4. How archivists can embrace social media to actively promote awareness and use of their collections
  5. The challenge faced by archive services with collecting, managing and describing born-digital archives  

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Melinda Haunton

  • Introduction to managing people and the legal considerations
  • Managing people: recruiting, selecting and managing staff
  • Managing money: finance and fundraising
  • Managing the service: processes, performance and monitoring
  • Managing the service: marketing and customer service
  • Managing the service: projects and change
  • Strategic planning and management

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Norman Reid

In the Management and Preservation of Digital Records module we explore the practical and theoretical aspects of this area, one which is increasingly important for nearly all records keepers.  Records are now overwhelmingly created and stored in digital form, and while drawing on the principles of traditional records keeping in this module we study the essential properties of digital records which make them very different to manage and preserve.  In the module we study the fundamental nature of digital records, their management and preservation, introduce the major standards such as OAIS and PREMIS, and study management considerations.  We also look at the future developments in the field.

  • The fundamental properties of digital records dictating their special management and preservation needs.
  • Digital archiving and preservation processes: comparing digital archiving and analogue archiving requirements.
  • Systems to support digital archiving and preservation: current status and limitations; the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) standard.
  • Metadata standards, including the PREMIS standard for preservation metadata.
  • Organisational and business considerations, including repository validation.
  • Special types of digital records, including emails and databases, social media, concluding with the future agenda.

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Melinda Haunton

Preservation and Disaster Management this is a combined modules consisting of the above two modules:

Preservation for Information Professionals (can be combined with Disaster Management for Information Professionals)

Preservation theory: the principles of preservation; understanding archival materials; threats to collectionsPreparing for action: storage and environment; archive surveys; archive formats; identification and storagePreservation in practice: handling records; working with conservators and allied professionals; digital preservation and the creation of surrogates; special circumstances

Disaster Management for Information Professionals (can be combined with Preservation for Information Professionals)

Risk management and business continuity: designing a disaster plan; environmental control; identifying and understanding risksPreparedness: appointing a disaster team; setting priorities; emergency operation plan; types of disaster; security; staff training and disaster simulationResponse and recovery: formulating systems for response and recovery

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Zoe Reid

Metadata standards are an essential component in the organisation and management of records and archival material.  With the digitisation of valuable and fragile material, metadata management has become an increasingly important part of the work of archivists and records managers.  Document management systems and EDRMS depend on well-organised and properly considered metadata in order to operate effectively.  This module takes students through the fundamental principles of metadata before discussing some of the metadata standards that are relevant to archives and records management.  The second half of the module studies information taxonomies and is based on classification principles.  Students will explore the types of taxonomy that are used in archives and records collections.  The module provides an opportunity for students to develop their own taxonomies and to understand the techniques that are used to create file plans and controlled vocabularies such as thesauri.

The Metadata Standards and Information Taxonomy module will cover the following areas:

  • What metadata is, the basic concepts behind metadata, and its role in the management of records collections and archives
  • Ways in which metadata provides better access to archival materials and records
  • Taxonomies and their role in categorising records and archival materials
  • The different types of taxonomy that are used including: simple hierarchies, faceted classifications and folksonomies
  • Management of taxonomies and their role as encoding schemes for creating metadata content
  • Creation of thesauri and file plans and how they are used for managing records

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

David Haynes

In the Business Archives and Records module we shall study the history of business and the development of business records, exploring the different types of records found in business archive collections and the key legislation affecting them. You will gain an understanding of the variety of repositories in which business archives are held and the role of the business archivist (whether working as an in-house corporate archivist or for another repository).

The module includes sections on appraisal, records management, research uses and the access issues which apply to business archives. Topics are discussed within the context of current developments for the business archives sector in the UK and abroad. Business records have the potential to be both a business and cultural asset providing crucial commentary on a nation’s economic, political and social development. This module will equip you to understand, manage and advocate for such collections under your care.

  • Introduction to business archives and the role of the business archivist
  • History of business, the records produced by business and their different types including financial records
  • Archival appraisal of business records, the role of records management in a corporate environment
  • Providing access to a business archive collection and how the various types of business archive can be of use to different types of researcher
  • The current issues which affect business archives in the UK and the wider overseas context 

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Credits

60 SCQF credits (30 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Patricia Whatley

Main topics are:

  • Ecclesiastical records, their location and their use in the context of the following areas
  • The established churches: their development and location of records
  • The non-conformist churches and the Episcopal and Catholic churches
  • The clergy: records created, their location and use
  • Church discipline and pastoral guidance including church courts
  • The parish including parish registers, poor relief, education and other local activities
  • The church fabric including plans and heritors

Number of credits

10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Peter Foden

In the English Palaeography and Diplomatic module, we shall study the different styles of handwriting to be found in English documents from the early 1500s up to the 19th century. We will also consider the form of many different classes of documents including manorial records, inheritance and conveyancing of land. This module has a strong practical emphasis and aims to ensure that you become confident in reading the different styles of handwriting which have been used in England and that you feel equipped to read any document you might be faced with.

  • Practical experience in reading the styles of handwriting used from the 16th to 19th centuries including secretary; italic and court hands
  • Knowledge of the conventions used when transcribing documents as well as the range of date forms and contractions used.
  • Knowledge of the diplomatic format of  documents which helps with reading and interpreting them
  • Ability to recognise different styles of hand writing
  • Develop the skills and confidence to read different and difficult handwriting.

Students are encouraged to work together and send regular tasks to the tutor.  This happens more frequently than in some other modules.

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Linda BankierClaire Skinner

  • The role of heraldry in identification and status
  • The design, meaning and description of coats of arms
  • The origins of heralds and heraldry
  • Developments in heraldry from the middle ages to the present day
  • The role of heraldry in historical and genealogical enquiries

Credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Peter O'Donoghue

  • History of rare books
  • Book production in the hand-press era
  • Bindings
  • Cataloguing and bibliographical descriptions
  • Managing collections and providing customer services
  • Developing access and promotional polices

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Melanie Wood

This module will explore:

  • the importance of records and archives and their impact in society
  • the nature of the record in the context of the wider data and information landscape
  • the development of recordkeeping functions and theories
  • regulations, standards, professionalism and ethics
  • concepts of records and archives within and beyond the discipline

You will notice that this module is about ‘recordkeeping’ rather than archives or records management. As will become apparent this is because so many of the underlying concepts are relevant to recordkeeping in general rather than to either just archives or just records management. Even though these are separated in employment terms (jobs are usually for either a records manager or an archivist) there is far more that connects than separates them.

The purpose of this module is to set the professional context for the work that you are undertaking or planning to undertake. So whether you are working with records or archives, or within a wider data and/or information environment it is important that you understand what ‘recordkeeping’ means and what concepts, functions, theories and practices come within its scope. As well as discussing the overarching importance of records and archives to society in general we shall consider the relevant regulatory, ethical and standards frameworks within which recordkeeping operates.

We shall also explore how other communities and disciplines use and view records and archives. Other CAIS modules focus on specific aspects in more detail: here we are taking a broad and introductory view of the recordkeeping landscape. But before going further I think we should start by considering why records and archives matter. Why would individuals, organisations and society be unable to function without them?

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Craig GauldMorag Fyfe-LucasMelinda Haunton

The module will start in Week 7 of the semester.

In the Intermediate Latin module we build on the grammar covered in Basic Latin or on your own previous Latin experience. Exercises include translating full documents and tests of more complex grammar. We also study examples of documents each week which are often or normally written in Latin, looking at the form, common phrases, hints for recognition and translation, and different types of dating. This module aims to build your confidence in Latin translation and document recognition to allow you to locate and translate salient points in the commonest Latin documents found in archives.

  • Intermediate Latin grammar
  • Recognising and translating Latin documents
  • Translating Latin monumental inscriptions
  • Latin dates
  • Hints for navigating Latin documents

Other options

If this is too advanced, try Basic Latin for Archivists and Researchers

Number of credits

10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Nicola Mills

Understanding and Reading Latin (can be taken as 2 x 10 credit modules - Basic Latin for Archivists and Researchers and Understanding Latin in Documents and Archives)

Module code

RM50033

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Nicola Mills

  • Techniques required to research the history of a house, locating and interpreting key sources
  • Dating houses and buildings: architectural styles, interiors and furnishings
  • Maps and land surveys, tracing community developments
  • Land and property law including manorial tenure, searching for title deeds, property inheritance and disputes
  • Finding occupants of houses and buildings
  • Social, local and national contexts

Number of credits

10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Nick BarrattMelanie Backe-Hansen

The Military Archives module explores the records of the British Armed Forces and how they can be used by archivists and librarians, local historians and genealogists.  It is very much a hands-on module with the emphasis firstly on debating some of the issues in current military history and, secondly, on how to effectively conduct research into aspects of military history from the decisions made by generals and politicians to the experiences of ordinary Tommies, Jocks and Jack Tars.   

  • Discusses the role of military history in modern British society. In particular it considers the importance of archives in the on-going debate on the meaning and consequences of the First World War.
  • Looks at the major types of records created by the military authorities over the past three hundred years.
  • Considers the importance of private papers and related artefacts created by service personnel.
  • Provides practical guidance on how to research service personnel from the 1760s to the 1960s.
  • Suggests ways of effectively using the military resources at The National Archives and more specialist military archives.

Number of credits

10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Simon Fowler

In the Public History module we study a wide range of historical activity as practised in the public sphere. We discuss what 'history' is, how it differs from 'public history', and its uses and abuses in public policy areas.  We look at the wide range of heritage offerings which allow the public not only to consume the past but also to participate in the creation of historical understanding, including engagement with archives.  We consider the current state of popular historical publishing, both fiction and non-fiction, as well as history in the media: on radio, TV and film.  By the end you should have a greater appreciation of the complexities of transmitting history to non-specialist audiences and how the public itself shapes and influences history in the wider world.  This module aims to enhance, stimulate and challenge your own use of history, whether in professional practice or as personal leisure activity.

  • What is history? Academic versus public history; ahistoricism: the use and abuse of history in the wider world.
  • History and public policy responsibilities; historical education and citizenship; past pain and present politics - repatriations, reparations, apologies and pardons.
  • Heritage and its organisations in the UK; heritage interpretation by and for the public; public history in the archive; social media and history.
  • How popular historical writing is commissioned, created and sold; the importance of 'story'; genre in fiction and non-fiction; hooks and books; on reviewing a book; historical magazines.
  • History on radio, TV and film; on being interviewed; the archivist and archival world in the media

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Caroline Shenton

The aim of this Module is to provide you with an overview of the historical development of oral history, to help you to develop an awareness of the legal, ethical and practical issues involved, and to help you on the way to developing the skills required to research, design, manage and even undertake oral history interviews (you will be recording an interview as part of your final assignment). We will also be looking at some of the wider issues - oral history changes the world, as well as records it, so ongoing analysis and reflection on the hows, whys and 'what's that all about' are an essential part of best practice and continuing professional development:

  • Introduction to oral history and its purpose
  • Planning an oral history project
  • Ethical, ownership and rights issues
  • Conducting and transcribing oral history interviews
  • Equipment, storage and access

Number of credits

10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Craig Fees

This module will provide students with:

  • An in-depth knowledge of British copyright law in its relation to archives and records
  • An understanding of this relates to European and international law
  • The ability to make judgments as to the ownership and duration of copyright
  • An understanding of copyright in the digital environment  

The module will examine the following areas:

  • British copyright in historical perspective
  • Subject matter and protection criteria
  • Authorship and ownership
  • Economic rights and infringement
  • Terms of protection and the 2039 rule
  • Exceptions for librarians, archivists and records managers
  • Orphan works: exceptions and licensing
  • Managing copyright: digitisation and risk

Number of credits

10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Victoria Stobo

This module will explore:

  • Introduction to theory and practice: historical development of the record keeping profession; functions and responsibilities of archivists; differences and similarities between records and archives
  • Acquisition and appraisal: policy development; methods of acquisition; accessioning procedures; the theory and practice of appraisal
  • Arrangement and description: provenance; arrangement; descriptive and indexing standards; finding aids; archives, the internet and new technologies

This Archive Management module builds on many of the topics and concepts discussed in The Theory and Context of Recordkeeping but focuses on the archival rather than the broader recordkeeping world. We will be looking at theoretical issues but very much in the context of practice. It is important that you are working or regularly volunteering in an archive, or if you are a records management student, have access to one. You will be drawing on this experience throughout the course, relating what you read to what you have seen in practice and applying what you learn to your working environment. You will also have plenty of opportunity to discuss issues and ideas with your fellow students.

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutors

Craig GauldAlex Du ToitCaroline Brown, Melinda Haunton

Knowing how to manage electronic records is imperative for all organizations to remain competitive and compliant in the digital age.  With the exponential rise in volume and processing capacity required for electronic data, being able to strategically align and understand core principles to effectively manage electronic records is a vital skill for archives and records managers.  Students will write analyses and develop their business writing style by compiling a series of reports targeted towards their organization’s director and senior management.  Students will also develop a knowledge base to become integral stakeholders in driving their organization towards records automation.

The electronic records management module will discuss:

  • Technical terms and concepts
  • Academic studies and current events
  • Business drivers and challenges
  • Electronic document / records management systems (ED/RMS)
  • Analysis of a student’s organizations’ own electronic records environment and recommendations for improvement

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Ilona Koti

This module is concerned with managing film, sound and photographic material. It looks at the historical development of the media, what it is made of, how it is managed and used, including their appropriate appraisal and preservation.

  • Historical Overview: development of photographs, cinefilm video recordings and sound recordings; the growth and development of specialist photographic, film and sound archives
  • Management and administration: collection policies; appraisal; accessioning; cataloguing;  access; copyright issues, ethics and standards in photographic, film and sound archives
  • Preservation: physical characteristics of photographs, cinefilm, video recordings and sound recordings; their handling conservation and restoration; storage; transportation; equipment conservation and maintenance; copying for preservation; data migration; emergency planning and disaster recovery

Number of credits

20 SCQF credits (10 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

David Lee, Rachel Nordstrom

In the Basic Latin module we shall start with the absolute basics of the classical language, suitable for any application, and used in documents all over Western Europe. Covering beginners’ grammar and translation, this module provides examples and practice to help you understand the structure of the language and the use of dictionaries, grammars and formularies, to equip you to translate easy documents. There is in addition background information on the history of the Latin language and its use in documents with particular emphasis on English and Scottish Latin documents.

  • An introduction to Latin and basic Latin grammar
  • How to use dictionaries, grammars and formularies
  • Proper names and numbers
  • Basic translations
  • How Latin is used in documents and why

The next step is Understanding Latin in Documents and Archives

Number of credits

10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Nicola Mills

Can be taken as a stand-alone 10 credit module or as part of the 20 credit module Preservation and Disaster Management. The module will begin in Week 7 of the semester.

  • risk management and business continuity: designing a disaster plan
  • environmental control
  • identifying and understanding risks
  • Preparedness: appointing a disaster team
  • setting priorities
  • emergency operation plan
  • types of disaster
  • security
  • staff training and disaster simulation
  • Response and recovery: formulating systems for response and recovery

The next step is Preservation for Information Professionals

Number of credits

10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Zoe Reid

 

Preservation theory: the principles of preservation; understanding archival materials; threats to collections

Preparing for action: storage and environment; archive surveys; archive formats; identification and storage

Preservation in practice: handling records; working with conservators and allied professionals; digital preservation and the creation of surrogates; special circumstances

Other options

This module can be combined with Disaster Management for Information Professionals

Number of credits

10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Zoe Reid

This module explores the range of education provision and providers from medieval times onwards, from primary to tertiary levels, in particular tracing the slow journey through the 18th and 19th centuries towards the establishment of a universal, free and compulsory system of elementary education.  It examines contemporary attitudes towards educating the children of the labouring classes and the legislative framework underpinning the development of education provision.   

The main elements covered in the module are

  • Historical background from the medieval period detailing the development of different types of schools including those in Scotland, and the range of different providers
  • Primary and secondary sources for the study of the history of education, schools, teachers and pupils,  including printed histories, parliamentary reports, records of the managing organisations, records of schools and other educational establishments as well as accounts of schooldays in literature and personal reminiscences
  • Workhouse and industrial schools, and reformatories
  • Special education provision, including education for working children, trade and craft schools and schools for blind and deaf children
  • Higher education
  • Teacher training
  • Adult education and self-improvement

Number of credits

10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS credits) on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

Tutor

Rosemary Steer

(Can be taken as a stand-alone 10 credit module or as part of the 20 credit module Complying with Information Legislation: Principles and Practice

This module will provide students with:

  • an understanding of the background and wider context to information legislation in the UK, with a particular focus on the freedom of information acts and environmental information regulations;
  • knowledge of the key principles governing compliance with freedom of information legislation and environmental information regulations as well as a foundation in relevant case law;
  • practical instruction on techniques for delivering and managing freedom of information and environmental information regulations compliance within a public authority;
  • an understanding of the impact of freedom of information and environmental information regulations on the work of archivists and records managers;
  • the ability to unite theory and practice in this field

This module provides students with a range of core skills and knowledge for the implementation of freedom of information and environmental information regulations compliance and will cover the following areas:

  • origins, context and development of the legislation;
  • principles, requirements and concepts;
  • the interaction between related pieces of legislation;
  • practical application of the legislation to real situations;
  • how to manage implementation in a public authority through techniques such as policy development, and monitoring, the development of practical solutions appropriate to the working environment in which the student operates;
  • understanding of how the requirements of information legislation fit with wider corporate structures and the integration of policies and procedures within those wider corporate structures.

Number of credits

10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS) credits on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)

 

(Can be taken as a stand-alone 10 credit module or as part of the 20 credit module Complying with Information Legislation: Principles and Practice). The module will start in Week 7 of the semester.

This module will provide students with:

  • an understanding of the background and wider context to information legislation in the UK, with a particular focus on data protection law and privacy rights;
  • knowledge of the key principles governing data protection as well as a foundation in relevant case law/ enforcement notices;
  • practical instruction on techniques for managing data protection compliance within a corporate environment;
  • an understanding of the impact of data protection and privacy rights on the work of archivists and records managers;
  • the ability to unite theory and practice in this field.

This module will cover the following areas:

  • origins, context and development of the legislation;
  • principles, requirements and concepts;
  • the interaction between related pieces of legislation;
  • practical application of the legislation to real situations;
  • how to manage implementation in a public authority through techniques such as policy development, and monitoring, the development of practical solutions appropriate to the working environment in which the student operates;
  • understanding of how the requirements of information legislation fit with wider corporate structures and the integration of policies and procedures within those wider corporate structures

Number of credits

10 SCQF credits (5 ECTS) credits on Level 5, SHE M (SCQF 11)