We offer a wide variety of computing modules.

The exact combination you'll able to choose will depend on scheduling and other considerations.

Undergraduate - Level 1

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Iain Martin.

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer:

Dr Iain Martin, i.martin@dundee.ac.uk, 2.11 QMB

If you use email, please include "AC11001 " in the heading.


About the Module

"The best way to learn how to design good software is to think about the people who will be using it first, then to practice designing good software for those people"

AC11001 and the follow-on module AC12001 aim to provide you with the basic skills required to produce these solutions and to communicate the results effectively and professionally. They do this by providing you with extensive hands-on experience of problem-solving within an Applied Computing context, programming in Java, using a set of carefully designed and enjoyable scenarios. You will also have the opportunity to report on these solutions in a variety of ways.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 Introduction and user requirements
2 Object-oriented design
3 Coding tools: Your first Java program.
4 Methods, statements and operators in Java
5 Inheritance
6 Control structures
7 Arrays, collections and iterators
8 Working with text files
9 Project work
10 Project work (and class test)
11 Project work

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignment, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Project requirements and design 1 3 8 10
Exercises with classes 4 5 6 10
Exercises with program control 6 7 6 10
Working with text files and arrays 8 9 6 10
Individual Project 9 11 20 30
CLASS TEST 11 11 1 30

Resource List

All course material will be available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Michael Crabb.

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer:

If you use email, please include "AC11002" in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of AC11002 is to give you the experience of web design through practical implementation tasks. You will use HTML and CSS as a base, and work on other client-side and server-side technologies. You will also consider the role and importance of the internet in society.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 GitHub and Code Versioning
2 CRAP Design
3 Introduction to HTML
4 CSS Styling
5 CSS Layout
6 CSS Frameworks
7 Atomic Design
8 Responsive Design
9 GitHub Pages and Jekyll
10 JavaScript
11 Open Revision Session
12 Peer Assessment

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Case study 1 4   20
Website development 1 11   60
Class test 1 12   20


Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Iain Martin.

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer:

If you use email, please include "AC12001" in the heading.


About the Module

"The best way to learn how to design good software is to design good software"

AC12001 builds on the skills and knowledge you have gained in AC11001. The course aims to provide you with further experience in designing and implementing software and give you further opportunities to communicate the results effectively and professionally. It does this by introducing and developing more advanced data structures and algorithms and gives you the opportunity to apply these skills in a team project, programming in Java


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Linked Lists
2 Stacks
3 Queues
4 Sets
5 Recursion
6 Binary Trees
7 Java GUIs
8 Project work
9 Project work
10 Project work
11 Project presentations / revision
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Stacks 2 3 10 10
Sets 4 5 10 10
Binary trees 6 7 10 10
Group project 9 11 38 20

Resource List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Alison Pease.

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC12003 " in the heading.


About the Module

This module is concerned with logic, arguing and critical thinking. Logic is the foundation of programming, mathematics and computer science. We will cover a history of logic and argumentation, including different styles of reasoning and how these are modelled in a computational context.

To account for these contexts, this module is split into three units which cover (i) logic, (ii)argument and critical analysis and (iii) computational tools for argumentation. The units work together to give students an understanding of classical logic and enable them to construct arguments and use computational tools that present their own position on a subject (argument construction) and critically evaluate (critical analysis) the arguments of another.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 A History of Logic and its Relation to Computer Science
2 Propositional Logic
3 Predicate Logic
4 Reasoning in AI and Cognitive Science
5 An Introduction to Argumentation
6 Independent Study
7 Identifying Arguments and their Structure
8 Evaluating Arguments
9 Complex Arguments
10 Using the Computer to Support Argument
11  Close Analysis
12  Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Investigative project 1 4   20
Close analysis with OVA 1 8   10
Formal analysis 1 11   20

Resource List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Undergraduate - Level 2

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Prof Stephen McKenna.

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC21007" in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of this module is to provide you with an understanding of methods of algorithm design, an understanding of algorithm complexity, knowledge and understanding of basic artificial intelligence tools. You will study:

 

  • Analysis of the structure of algorithms, pseudocode conventions
  • Space and Time complexity, Big-Oh notation
  • Artificial Intelligence: Graph/network analysis methods, Use of SNAP C++ library for AI program development, Basics of machine-learning and neural networks in AI.

Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Introduction to Algorithms
2 Space Complexity
3 Time Complexity
4 Complexity classes
5 Sorting algorithms
6 Network analysis in AI
7 Network analysis methods in AI (1)
8 Network analysis methods in AI (2)
9 Introduction to Neural Networks
10 AI assignment completion

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Class Tests (weekly) 1 2-6 20 10
AI project 7 10 40 40

Resource List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr David Flatla

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC21008 " in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of this module is to provide you with experience with developing in C and C++, through the exploration of data structures. You will complete practical work in both languages implementing a variety of data structures, building on what you have learned last year in AC12001.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 C Fundamentals
2 C Memory Management
3 Defensive Programming in C
4 C Data Structures I
5 C Data Structures II
6 C++ Fundamentals I
7 C++ Fundamentals II
8 C++ Object Orientation
9 C++ Templates
10 C++ Standard Library
11 Revision
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark. The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.This module has a Qualifying Fail condition – you must pass both the coursework and the
final degree exam in order to pass AC21008.


Assignments

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
C Fundamentals 1 4 10 10
C Data Structures 4 7 15 15
C++ Data Structures 7 10 25 25

Resource List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Iain Murray

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC21009" in the heading.


About the Module

AC21009 Computer Systems 2A is a Level 2 Computing module that runs in the first semester. Together with AC22005 Computer Systems 2B (second semester), it forms one third of Level 2.

AC21009 covers UNIX (theory and operation) and fundamentals of computer hardware; programming assignments are done in C/C++ under Unix, although this is not taught on this module.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Introduction to UNIX
2 Processes and permissions
3 BASH scripting 1
4 BASH scripting 2
5 Reading week
6 Architecture: overview and logic
7 Architecture: fetch-execute cycle
8 Architecture: CPU, memory, I/O
9 Architecture: compilers
10 Architecture: towards the operating system
11 Tutorials: Software Licencing
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Shell scripting  2  5  10 10
Cellular Automaton  6  8  10 10
Manchester Baby  8  11  14 14
Software Licencing Tutorial  8  11  6 6

Reading List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "Creative Interactions" in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of the Creative Interactions module is to explore the different ways that we caninteract with computers. You will have opportunities to develop interactive interfaces for a variety of situations.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Introduction to Processing
2 2D primitives
3 Mouse interaction
4 Animation
5 Keyboard interaction
6 Project work
7 Objects and classes
8 Software libraries
9 Other inputs
10 Project work
11 Revision
12 Class test

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
2D image 1 3 21 20
Snapchat 4 6 14 25
Installation 8 10 21 30
Class test 1 12 25 25

Resource List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Professor Annalu Waller.

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "Users and Interfaces" in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of the Users and Interfaces module is to explore the design of human computer interfaces for different groups. You will develop your design skills while working with a varied user group in order to consider the needs and abilities of users. 


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Introduction to Users and Human Factors
2 Qualitative methods, Personas and User Stories
3 Focus Group, Accessibility
4 Prototyping, Tutorials
5 Project work
6 Project work, Tutorials
7 Project work
8 Project work
9 Project work and presentations
10 Interfaces of the future
11 Revision
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark. The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Heuristics report 1 2 10 10
Design report and implementation 2 4, 6 and 9 20 20
Examination all 12,13 20 20

Resource List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Craig Ramsay

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC22004 " in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of this module is to provide a solid foundation in object-oriented analysis and design practices and principles, which will enable students to produce professional, high-quality specifications and designs for a software system using the industry standard Unified Modeling Language (UML). It also considers other important areas of software engineering, such as software lifecycles and requirements specification.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Introduction and Software Lifecycles
2 Requirements management and specification and Use cases
3 Use Case Specifications, threat modelling 
4 Object-Oriented Analysis
5 UML Relationships
6 UML Packages and layers
7 UML sequence diagrams
8 Design patterns
9  State Transition Diagrams
10  Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Requirements, use cases and threat model 1 5   15
Structural, object-oriented design of a software model 1 8   13
Behavioural, object-oriented design and design patterns 1 10   12

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr. Iain Murray

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC22005 " in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of this module is to provide you with a broad understanding of modern computer architecture and operating systems. This module takes a unified view of the hardware and software which make up the major functional components of the computer. The integrated study of Operating Systems and hardware platforms gives a clear insight into the operation of the modern computer system. The module also includes an introduction to programming in C#, and some of the coursework exercises will utilise this.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 Introduction to module, C# programming.
2 Computer systems overview
3 The processor
4 I/O Methods and I/O Buffering
5 Computer Buses and Workstation Architecture.
6 Operating systems overview
7 Process scheduling
8 Concurrency
9 Concurrency
10 File allocation and disc scheduling.
11 Professional Issues, system security, distributed systems.
12  Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Introductory programming 2 4   13
Group report and presentation 5 6   14
Multi-thread programming 7 10   13

Reading List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC22006 " in the heading.


About the Module

An introduction to physical computing, the importance of well-designed human-computer interfaces and the extended interactional opportunities afforded by a rich range of sensors and actuators connected to the microcontroller.

Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Introduction to Physical Computing
2 Fundamentals of Arduino
3 Sensors
4 Actuators
5 Revision
6 Sensor project
7 The Internet of Things, Escape Rooms
8 Final Project
9 Final Project
10 Final Project
11 Revision
12  Class test

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Interesting Arduino 1 3 12 10
Sensor Project 5 7 25 20
Final Project 7 10 40 30

Reading List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Craig Ramsay

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see one of the lecturer(s):

Dr Craig Ramsay, cdramsay@dundee.ac.uk, 2.11 QMB

If you use email, please include "AC22007 " in the heading.


About the Module

 

"The best way to learn how to design good software is to design good software"

Applied Computing is about the design and implementation of original and imaginative solutions to meet the needs of users, and about communicating these solutions in a professional way.

AC12001 builds on the skills and knowledge you have gained in AC11001. The course aims to provide you with further experience in designing and implementing software, and give you further opportunities to communicate the results effectively and professionally. It does this by introducing and developing more advanced data structures and algorithms, and gives you the opportunity to apply these skills in a team project.

By the end of the course you will:

 

  • obtain further experience with the skills developed in AC11001 - programming, use of basic computer tools to develop programs, and transferable skills
  • have an understanding of the more commonly used data structures and algorithms
  • have knowledge of how these data structures and algorithms may be used in program design and implementation
  • gain experience in team work through an end of course project.

Credit Rating

There are 20 Scotcat points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 Linked Lists
2 Stacks
3 Queues
4 Sets
5 Recursion
6 Consolidation week
7 Binary Trees
8 Project work
9 Project work
10 Project work
11 Project Presentations / Revision
12  
13  

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.
Tutorial(s) count for 0 of the final module mark.


Resource List

A module handbook will be provided electronically containing worksheets and practical labsheets. It is up to you to take your own notes in class. Copies of any lecture overheads the lecturers use will be made available on Blackboard, with the handbook, and practical sheets.

Any books which you found helpful for AC11001 will also be helpful for AC12001. In addition, in the field of data structures and algorithms, there are many books about. The books mentioned below are some suggestions, but please browse in the library, and in bookshops. John Smith bookshop next to the College Shop on campus, Waterstones (Ottakars) in the city centre and Borders (near the bus station) all have reasonable selections of computing books, as do the major online booksellers.

Module reading list (from Library and Learning Centre)


Undergraduate - Level 3

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Professor Chris Reed

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC31007 " in the heading.


About the Module

The course aims to give you an appreciation of agile methods in software engineering by contrasting these with more traditional methodologies. You will implement a significant software development project following the principles of Agile Software Engineering.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 Agile methods overview
2 User stories, backlogs and acceptance tests
3 Test-driven development, refactoring and pair programming
4 Test-driven development, refactoring and version control
5 Sprint 1
6 Sprint 1
7 Sprint 1 review and retrospective
8 Sprint 2
9 Sprint 2
10 Ethics, legal and professional issues, technical documentation
11 Review and retrospective
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Sprint 1 4 6 30 20
Sprint 2 7 9 30 20

Resource List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Professor John Arnott

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC31008 " in the heading.


About the Module

The course aims to equip you with a broad understanding of data communications techniques as seen in computer networks. This will be done through study of examples of data communications protocols and methods of communicating computer data.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 Introduction to Data Communications. Open Systems Integration (OSIRM), layered protocols, peer processes.
2 Data Link Layer, flow control, sliding window protocols, packet re-transmission. DNS.
3 Wide Area Networks (WANs), Packet routing, Network Layer, IP. The Internet.
4 Transport Layer, TCP, Transport connection across networks. Error Protection.
5 Local Area Networks (LANs - wired). IEEE 802 Protocols, CSMA/CD, Ethernet.
6 Physical Layer (1). Communications media and their physical characteristics; bandwidth and data rate.
7 Physical Layer (2). Modems, cellular operation, ADSL.
8 Local Area Networks (LANs - wireless). CSMA/CA.
9 Professional issues. Security.
10 Multimedia, Data compression, Application Layer.
11 Revision Week.
12 Revision Week.

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 20% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 80% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Domain Name System (DNS) and Network Monitor Exercise 4 8 15 20

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed fromMy Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.


Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Karen Petrie

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC31009 " in the heading.


About the Module

The course aims to explore contemporary concepts in games development. A comprehensive individual game project allows you to implement a game on a platform of your choice. The module is assessed entirely by coursework to allow time for full development of your game.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Game Design
2 Hardware and Software
3 Moral and Ethical Considerations
4 Graphics and Audio
5 Event driven programming and games programming
6 Design patterns
7 Design patterns group work
8 Design patterns group work
9 Game specific programming
10 Security in game programming
11 Elevator pitches for game
12 Time to work on game

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Games Concept Pitch 1 4 20 10
Elevator pitch 1 11 20 10
Create a tutorial 6 8 40 20
Professionalism 1 16 20 10
Full game development 1 16 100 50

Reading List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC32005 " in the heading.


About the Module

This module explores key concepts in Human Computer Interaction through practical tasks and critical evaluation of the research literature. This includes elements of the history and development of HCI, mobile HCI, situational impairments, review of published research papers, and a quantitative experiment to assess the quality of an interface.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 History of HCI
2 Presentations
3 Interaction Elements
4 Quantitative Methods
5 Experimental Design
6 Data
7 Statistical Analysis
8 Mobile HCI & Situational Impairments
9 Current Trends in HCI
10 Revision
11 Revision
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.


Assignments

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Presentation 1 2 20 20
Paper Discussion 3 5 10 10
Experiment Report 5 9 20 20

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Iain Murray

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC32006 " in the heading.


About the Module

This course aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the various database architectures, and teach the theory and practice of database design. We will study the relational model of databases, both from the theoretical standpoint of understanding why it has become so important, and from the more practical standpoint of how to design and build a database using this model. Practical illustration of theory is given throughout the course. The database engine that will be used will be primarily MySQL; however alternative relational databases will be discussed.

Alternative database topics, including data warehouses, OLAP and data mining will also be covered.

The aim is to give you a sound understanding of the principles of database design and for you to develop the ability to employ this understanding in building databases which will work correctly and efficiently in a real-world context.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Introduction / Review - Conceptual Database Design / ER Diagrams
2 Review - Physical Database Design / Guest lecture: Data Warehousing
3 Transactions / Views / Security
4 PHP as a database interface
5 Hypermedia and Graph Databases
6 Online Analytical Processing (OLAP)
7 Data mining
8 Data Visualisation
9 Multimedia Databases
10 Real-time and Object-Oriented Databases
11 Revision
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Database design  2  5  8 10
Database implementation  6  10  20 30

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Sasa Radomirovic.

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "Information Security" in the heading.


About the Module

The course aims to give a solid introduction to information security and touch upon important applications, evolving technologies, and new security threats.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Security Management: Confidentiality, Integrity, Availability; Risks, threats, and vulnerabilities
2 Web security and ethical hacking
3 Secret-key cryptography
4 Public-key cryptography
5 Key exchange protocols, SSL/TLS
6 Authentication protocols, passwords
7 Human Factors
8 Electronic cash
9 Bitcoin and blockchain technologies
10 Privacy
11 Revision
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Ethical hacking 2 4 20 20
Applied Cryptography  8 8 20 20

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed fromMy Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.


Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Keith Edwards

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC32008 " in the heading.


About the Module

This module aims to introduce general models of computation such as finite state automata and Turing machines and their relationship to classes of languages, and use these models to explore the limits of the power of computers.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 Introduction to languages, finite automata
2 Deterministic and nondeterministic finite automata; equivalence of DFA and NFA
3 Regular expressions, equivalence with finite automata, Pumping Lemma
4 Turing machines, (partially) decidable languages, computable functions
5 Church-Turing thesis, TMs as generators, Universal Turing Machines
6 Undecidability, the Halting Problem, examples of undecidable problems
7 Time complexity, decision problems, polynomial time, the class P
8 Non-deterministic TMs, polynomial transformations, the class NP
9 NP-completeness, Cook's theorem, examples of NP-complete problems
10 Revision
11 Revision
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 20% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 80% of the final module mark.


 Assignments

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Class Test 1 5 5 10 10
Class Test 2 9 9 10 10

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Undergraduate - Level 4

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Keith Edwards

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC40001 " in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of your project is to give you experience in carrying out an independent software development project which is the culmination of your years of study in Computing and relevant to your future career plans.

A typical project will contain all stages of the software development life-cycle and will be designed for usability. However, some projects, for example more technical research-oriented projects, may lack some other these aspects and include others appropriate to the particular project.

You are responsible for the technical aspects and day-to-day management of your project. Your supervisor is there to provide guidance and advice and to monitor your progress. Every effort will be made to allocate you the project and supervisor of your choice but this is not always possible. If you want to discuss any general problems you are having with your project, please make an appointment to see the course co-ordinator.


Credit Rating

There are 45 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

The stages of your project should be discussed with your project supervisor in order to ensure that you have a sensible plan in place to complete all required outcomes of your specific project.


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Resources

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Iain Martin

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC41001 " in the heading.


About the Module

The unit covers three-dimensional, interactive, colour computer graphics.

The two main aims of the unit are:

  • To study the algorithms that underpin modern computer graphics.
  • To provide experience in programming computer-generated images of 3D scenes

The unit begins by looking at environments for writing modern graphics code and understanding how to create and render basic scenes. The theory of the graphics pipeline and shader coding is discussed at an early stage and revisited throughout the module with an emphasis of relating theory to practical examples. Some elementary theory from co-ordinate geometry is reviewed in order to understand more complex computer graphics algorithms that are used later. We then examine three-dimensional, colour and interactive graphics, along with animation techniques.

As each topic is addressed, the underlying algorithms will be discussed, and their practical implementation will be described with practical programming experience through labs and assignments. A major objective of the unit is to provide students with first-hand experience of modern graphics programming.


Credit Rating

There are 15 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1  
2  
3  
4 Graphics programming environments, OpenGL and our first graphics programs.
5 The graphics pipeline, GPU shaders, vectors, matrices.
6 Transformations and projections
7 Colour, lighting and shading
8 Textures, depth buffer, blending, antialasing, fog
9 Procedural graphics generation, L-systems, fractal surfaces, noise
10 Shadow casting, normal mapping and particle animations
11 Geometry and tessellation shaders, ray tracing and radiosity
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Programming assignment 1 6 8 20 20
Programming assignment 2 9 12 20 20

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Jianguo Zhang

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC41002" in the heading.


About the Module

Providing computers with the ability to "see" is the subject of continuing and fast-moving research. This course provides a practical introduction to both the underlying technology and its applications. Applications areas include automated inspection in manufacturing, biomedical image analysis, vehicle guidance, face and gesture recognition, and robotics. The aim of this course is to provide you with an understanding of Computer Vision techniques and their application, through practical experiences.


Credit Rating

There are 15 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1  
2  
3  
4 Introduction, histograms and thresholds, colour
5 image formation, sampling, spatial and frequency domains
6 Filters, scale, edges, optic flow
7 Feature points, feature matching
8 Grouping and segmentation
9 Classification and recognition
10 Recognition and tracking
11 Tutorial and debate
12 Presentations and revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 30% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 70% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Computer Vision Software 6 11-12 30 30

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Craig Ramsay

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC41004 " in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of the module is to provide you with an opportunity to increase your knowledge and understanding, and to refine your skills in software development as a member of a project team working on an assignment set by an industrial client. The project also enables you to consolidate and put into practice the knowledge, skills and understanding which you have previously gained in areas such as HCI & Usability Engineering, Software Engineering and GUI programming.

Working in small teams (5-7), you will undertake a user-centred software development project to the brief given at the first meeting with the client. During the course of the project your team will be required to:

  • Design and develop a series of evolving prototype solutions;
  • Present your prototype solutions to the client for feedback;
  • Organise the team's effort to maximise use of its skills;
  • Provide regular updates to the senior management team on progress and plans;
  • Negotiate with the customer on changes in requirements to ensure timely delivery of the final product;
  • Deliver a maintainable software solution;
  • Manage the expectations of the customer;
  • Manage workloads such that team members operate within their capacity;

The team, with you as a member, will be responsible for all aspects of project planning including time allocation, task assignment, etc. As a team you will be required to design, implement and test the solution and to report on progress to the project manager and other reviewers at various stages throughout the project.

You are expected to produce reliable, usable and maintainable software.

Each team member should maintain a personal log documenting their contribution to the team's goals and their individual deliverables.


Credit Rating

There are 15 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

The module will be run in the first semester during weeks 1-3 and will occupy 100% of the available time of each team member during that period. You will have no other modules running during this time.

During these three weeks you will have regular meetings with the lecturer and the client in order to track your progress.


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Final report and presentation 1 3 120 100

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Professor Annalu Waller

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC41007" in the heading.


About the Module

AC41007 will have students develop a commercial market understanding that complements technical and computer science knowledge and an understanding for product management. Ultimately, students will have an understanding of the roles of product development and product marketing and the potential career path of product development for engineers. The module is a mix of case studies, practical exercises, and theoretical topics. The theoretical topics will be delivered by business professionals and staff from the University. There will be a number of case studies which will involve entrepreneurs giving a talk about their work, how they develop products for the market, and how they market these. We are hoping that their enthusiasm will ignite the class and provide a unique view of the business world.

Credit Rating

There are 15 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

Week 
1  
2  
3  
4 Introduction to module; Project Management Session 1 
5 Product Management Session 2
6 Product Management Session 3
7 Product Management Session 4 
8 Intellectual Property
9 Guest Lectures
10 Guest Lectures
11 Project Presentations
12 Revision Week

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.
TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Market Report and Presentation 4 11 and 12 60 50

Reading List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Professor Annalu Waller

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC41010 " in the heading.


About the Module

A work placement is a period of time spent working in an industrial, commercial or research organisation using computers and the knowledge gained so far during the undergraduate course. The aim of the work placement is for students to gain experience in industry, commerce or research and so strengthen their career opportunities.

The work placement takes place during the summer vacation between the junior and senior honours years and is normally a full time paid placement of twelve weeks’ duration; this can include 2 weeks of holiday if agreed with the academic and industrial supervisor. Any placement of less than full time must be approved by the module coordinator in advance of the placement starting.

The work placement is an optional module and it is the student's responsibility to find a suitable placement. Students are able to take up a placement where they already have a connection (e.g. a relative works in the company) and they are able to take up work placements abroad if the amount of academic supervision is approved by the module coordinator in advance of the placement starting.

If the work placement and assessment criteria are completed, the mark awarded for this module can be used in preference to the lowest mark obtained in the other honours modules when determining the degree to be awarded. The work placement mark can be used to replace a mark of any of the Level 3 or Level 4 modules rated at most 20 SCQF points but the lowest pass may only be raised by one band (and a maximum of 3 grades) such as a D3 to a C3; a D2 to a C2 ; a D1 to a C1. Note that the student will still have to do the normal set of Level 4 modules (totalling 120 credits) giving the necessary breadth of knowledge to pursue a range of career opportunities.

If the work placement is in a research setting and related to the student's upcoming Honours project, a clear description of how the work placement differs from the Honours project must be provided. Note that the summer work placement itself cannot count as work towards the Honours project.

The type of work done is taken into account when assessing a work placement. Software development activities will count more highly than IT service based placements. The level of responsibility taken on by the student will also be taken into account.

Work Statement

A work statement must be produced before the University agrees that a work placement can be counted towards an honours degree.

The work statement will form an understanding between the student, academic supervisor

and industrial supervisor on what work will be undertaken by the student during the course of the work placement. Modifications to the work statement can be made at any time during the placement provided that the prior agreement of the industrial and academic supervisors is obtained. Since the company will be employing the student during the work placement period they will naturally be able to direct the student's work in whatever way suits the business. The work statement should only be altered if there is a major change in the work being done.

Credit Rating

There are 15 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

The specific timetable you will follow during the work placement will be agreed with the industrial and academic supervisors as part of your work statement. It is expected that you will be working full-time for the twelve weeks of your placement.


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Weekly progress reports       10
Final report       60
Presentation       25
Industrial supervisors report       5

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Mr Andy Cobley

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC41011 " in the heading.


About the Module

This module looks at how we can store, manipulate and analyse big data. We define big data essentially as data that it non-atomic and is not well suited to tabular storage and manipulation. It is important to ensure that the students can understand why these two broad classes of data really are different and why they warrant such different treatment.


Credit Rating

There are 15 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1  
2  
3  
4 Introduction to Big Data
5 Lambda design patterns
6 NoSQL
7 Hadoop
8 Hadoop
9 Erlang
10 Storm
11 Project Week
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
NoSQL presentation 4 7-8 20 20
Erlang 11 14 20 20

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

AC41012 - User Experience


Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC41012" in the heading.


About the Module

This module explores theory in user experience, including design pattern, human factors, and evaluation methods. You will then work in a team to use design and prototyping techniques, creating a user-focussed solution to a given problem.


Credit Rating

There are 15 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1  
2  
3  
4 Introduction to UX, whiteboard challenge
5 Stakeholders, Scenarios and Personas, Human Factors
6 Design patterns; paper prototyping
7 Mobile UX
8 Digital and interactive prototyping, Product Design
9 Whiteboard challenge
10 Evaluation of design and interaction, Introduction to Service Design
11 Interactive prototypes demonstrations
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 60% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 40% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Design report 5 7 25 25
Prototype Implementation 8 11 25 35

Resource List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC42001 " in the heading.


About the Module

Research Frontiers is a final year module which runs in the second semester. In this module, you will be exposed to highly focused areas of leading edge research in computing. You will gain a detailed understanding of computing research topics, which developing transferable skills connected with approaches to research and advanced development.

AC42001 is a 30 credit module and AC42002 is a 15 credit module. It consists of two blocks; from which you will select topics to study. The topics available will be indicated to you in a presentation at the end of semester 1. These will be drawn from the research expertise within computing.

AC42001: You will select a total of four units, two from the first block and two from the second block.

AC42002: You will select a total of two units, one from the first block and one from the second.


Credit Rating

There are 30 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject

1

Block 1

2

Block 1

3

Block 1

4

Block 1

5

Block 1

6

Block 2

7

Block 2

8

Block 2

9

Block 2

10

Block 2


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments. Assignments will be made available within each option. The total coursework mark for each option is worth 25% of your overall grade.


Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr. Katarzyna Budzynska

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see one of the lecturer(s):

Dr Katarzyna Budzynska, k.budzynska@dundee.ac.uk, 1.19 QMB
Dr David Flatla, d.flatla@dundee.ac.uk, 2.06 QMB
Dr Rachel Menzies, r.menzies@dundee.ac.uk, 2.07 QMB
Dr Karen Petrie, karenpetrie@computing.dundee.ac.uk, 2.18 QMB
Professor Chris Reed, c.a.reed@dundee.ac.uk, 1.21 QMB
Professor Emanuele Trucco, manueltrucco@computing.dundee.ac.uk, 1.01 QMB
Professor Annalu Waller, a.waller@dundee.ac.uk, 2.02 QMB

If you use email, please include "AC42002 " in the heading.


About the Module

 

Research Frontiers (AC42002) is a final year course which runs in the second semester. Students select a total of two units, usually, one from the first block and one from the second block. The available units are:


Block 1

  • Assistive Technology - Annalu Waller
  • Constraint Programming - Karen Petrie
  • Exploring Colour Vision Deficiency - David Flatla
  • User Experience - Rachel Menzies

Block 2

  • Augmentative and Alternative Communication - Annalu Waller
  • Argument Technologies -  Chris Reed
  • Text Mining -  Katarzyna Budzynska
  • Robot Eyes - Manuel Trucco

Credit Rating

There are 15 Scotcat points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
13  

1

AT,  CP, ECVD, UX

2

AT, CP, ECVD, UX

3

AT, CP, ECVD, UX

4

AT, CP, ECVD, UX

5

AT, CP, ECVD, UX

6

AAC, ArgT, ECVD, TM, RE

7

AAC, ArgT, ECVD, TM, RE

8

AAC, ArgT, ECVD, TM, RE

9

AAC, ArgT, ECVD, TM, RE

10

AAC, ArgT, ECVD,  TM, RE

11

 

12

 

13

 


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.

Postgraduate

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Professor Stephen McKenna

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC50001" in the heading.


About the Module

This module will introduce you to some of the main approaches used for data mining and machine learning. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of different algorithms for machine learning and data mining, and gain skills in applying them to analyse data, make predictions, and evaluate performance. You will learn about:

  • Probabilistic models
  • Bayesian inference
  • Linear models for regression and classification
  • Maximum likelihood and MAP
  • Neural networks (including deep learning)
  • Max-margin methods (SVMs)
  • Clustering
  • Dimensionality reduction and visualisation
  • Performance evaluation
  • Application examples

Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1  
2 Introduction to module, Probability calculus
3 Expectations, sampling and distributions. Directed graphical models (Bayes nets)
4 Learning and inference in Bayes nets
5 Bayes nets / generative models
6 OpenBUGS
7  
8 Intro to supervised learning & linear models for regression
9 Intro to Matlab
10 Students submit assignment 1
11

 

12  

Semester 2

WeekSubject
1 Performance evaluation
2
Performance evaluation, Linear models for regression and classification
3 Logistic classifiers, neural networks, Deep neural networks
4  
5 Support vector machines (SVMs)
6 SVMs, Clustering methods
7 Clustering methods
8 Dimensionality reduction for data analysis and visualisation
9

Problem set 2

10 Students submit assignment 2
11

 

12  

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 30% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 70% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Probabilistic models and inference S1:5 S1:10 10 10
Classification and Clustering S2:2 S2:10 20 20

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Keith Edwards

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC50002" in the heading.


About the Module

This module aims to teach the skills a data engineer will need to program algorithms to manipulate and analyse data. The module will address current programming paradigms and languages that are commonly used for data engineering. You will learn about:

 

  • D3.js for visualisation.
  • The Python programming language and its data structures, text processing.
  • Matlab for mathematical problems.
  • The R statistical language.

Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

Semester 1

WeekTopics Covered
1  
2 Overview of module, D3
3 D3
4 D3
5 Python
6 Python
7 Python
8 Python
9 Python

Semester 2

WeekTopics Covered
1 Matlab
2 Matlab
3 Matlab
4 Matlab
5 Matlab
6 R
7 R
8 R
9 R

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
There is no final degree exam for this module.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
D3 S1:4 S1:7 20 20
Python S1:9 S1:14 30 30
Matlab S2:1 S2:6 30 30
R S2:7 S2:10 20 20

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC52013" in the heading.


About the Module

This module explores key concepts in Human Computer Interaction through practical tasks and critical evaluation of the research literature. This includes elements of the history and development of HCI, mobile HCI, situational impairments, review of published research papers, and a quantitative experiment to assess the quality of an interface.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 History of HCI
2 Presentations
3 Interaction Elements
4 Quantitative Methods
5 Experimental Design
6 Data
7 Statistical Analysis
8 Mobile HCI & Situational Impairments
9 Current Trends in HCI
10 Revision
11 Revision
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark. 
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark. 


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Presentation 1 2 20 20
Paper Discussion 3 5 10 10
Experiment Report 5 9 20 20

Reading List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Professor Emanuele Trucco

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC51002" in the heading.


About the Module

The course discusses the fundamental issues involved in problem-solving using the computer. The various stages involved in producing high-quality software are discussed in detail, and the programs are written using C+ +, a powerful and widely used computer programming language. The course material is discussed and demonstrated in the lectures (three per week) and during the weekly computer laboratory sessions.

When you have finished the course you will have:

 

  • a detailed knowledge of the essential steps in the software development process,
  • a knowledge of the basics of the C++ programming language,
  • exposure to object-orientated programming and the experience of implementing it.

Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 Introduction: concept of programming, algorithms, classes and objects, basic structure of a C++ program
2 C++ syntax, variables, data types, simple flow of control
3 Functions, parameters, call-by-value, call-by-reference, overloading
4 Testing and debugging, programming style
5 Objects, classes, attributes, methods
6 Programming with classes, encapsulation, inheritance, data types, abstract data types (ADT's)
7 Logical expressions, flow of control.
8 Arrays, strings, file handling
9 Overloading operators
10 Revision
11  
12  

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Laboratory log 2 4 5 5
Programming 1 5 7 15 15
Programming 2 8 10 20 20

Resource List

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Craig Ramsay

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC51003 " in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of this module is to teach several important areas of software engineering concentrating on the specification and design of software systems and project management. The module provides a solid foundation in object-oriented analysis and design practices and principles, which will enable students to produce professional, high-quality specifications and designs for a software system using the industry standard Unified Modeling Language (UML). It also considers other important areas of software engineering such as software lifecycles, requirements specification, design patterns and principles, software project management, software quality, software testing, and professional and ethical issues.


Credit Rating

There are 20 Scotcat points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Introduction. Software Lifecycles
2
Requirements management and specification and Use cases
3 Use case specifications, threat modelling
4 Object-oriented analysis
5 UML relationships
6 UML packages and layers
7 UML sequence diagrams and design patterns.
8 Project Management
9 Software testing
10 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Requirements, use cases and threat model 1 5 12 12
Structural, object-oriented design of a software model 1 7 10 10
Behavioural, object-oriented design and design patterns 1 9 8 8
Project Management 8 10 10 10

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Professor Chris Reed

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC51004 " in the heading.


About the Module

The course aims to give you an appreciation of agile methods in software engineering by contrasting these with more traditional methodologies. You will implement a significant software development project following the principles of Agile Software Engineering.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Agile methods overview
2 User stories, backlogs and acceptance tests
3 Test-driven development, refactoring and pair programming
4 Test-driven development, refactoring and version control
5 Sprint 1
6 Sprint 1
7 Sprint 1 review and retrospective
8 Sprint 2
9 Sprint 2
10 Ethics, legal and professional issues, technical documentation
11 Review and retrospective
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Sprint 1 4 6 30 20
Sprint 2 7 9 25 15
Kanban report 7 9 5 5

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Professor Annalu Waller

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC51005 " in the heading.


About the Module

AC51005 will have students develop a commercial market understanding that complements technical and computer science knowledge and an understanding of product management. Ultimately, students will have an understanding of the roles of product development and product marketing and the potential career path of product development for engineers.

The module is a mix of case studies, practical exercises and theoretical topics. The theoretical topics will be delivered by business professionals and staff from the University. There will be a number of case studies which will involve entrepreneurs giving a talk about their work, how they develop products for the market, and how they market these. We are hoping that their enthusiasm will ignite the class and provide a unique view of the business world.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1  
2  
3  
4 Introduction to module - Product Management Session 1
5 Product Management Session 2
6 Product Management Session 3
7 Product Management Session 4
8 Intellectual Property
9 Guest Lectures
10 Guest Lectures
11 Project Presentations
12 Revision Week

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 50% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 50% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Essay 4 7 10 10
Market report and presentation 4 11 and 12 50 40

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Jianquo Zhang

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC51007 " in the heading.


About the Module

Providing computers with the ability to "see" is the subject of continuing and fast-moving research. This course provides a practical introduction to both the underlying technology and its applications. Applications areas include automated inspection in manufacturing, biomedical image analysis, vehicle guidance, face and gesture recognition, and robotics. The aim of this course is to provide you with an understanding of Computer Vision techniques and their application, through practical experiences.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1  
2  
3  
4 Introduction, histograms and thresholds, colour
5 Image formation, sampling, spatial and frequency domains
6 Filters, scale, edges, optic flow
7 Feature points, feature matching
8 Grouping and segmentation
9 Classification and recognition
10 Recognition and tracking
11 Tutorial and debate
12 Presentations and revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 30% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 70% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Computer Vision Project 6 11-12 30 30

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Iain Martin

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC51008 " in the heading.


About the Module

The unit covers three-dimensional, interactive, colour computer graphics.

The two main aims of the unit are:

 

  • To study the algorithms that underpin modern computer graphics.
  • To provide experience in programming computer-generated images of 3D scenes

 

The unit begins by looking at environments for writing modern graphics code and understanding how to create and render basic scenes. The theory of the graphics pipeline and shader coding is discussed at an early stage and revisited throughout the module with an emphasis on relating theory to practical examples. Some elementary theory from co-ordinate geometry is reviewed in order to understand more complex computer graphics algorithms that are used later. We then examine three-dimensional, colour and interactive graphics, along with animation techniques.

As each topic is addressed, the underlying algorithms will be discussed, and their practical implementation will be described with practical programming experience through labs and assignments.A major objective of the unit is to provide students with first-hand experience of modern graphics programming.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1  
2  
3  
4 Graphics programming environments, OpenGL and our first graphics programs
5 The graphics pipeline, GPU shaders, vectors, matrices
6 Transformations and projections
7 Colour, lighting and shading
8 Textures, depth buffer, blending, antialiasing, fog
9 Procedural graphics generation, L-systems, fractal surfaces, noise
10 Shadow casting, normal mapping and particle animations
11 Geometry and tessellation shaders, ray tracing and radiosity
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Programming assignment 1 6 8 20 20
Programming assignment 2 9 12 20 20

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC51010 " in the heading.


About the Module

This module explores theory in user experience, including design pattern, human factors, and evaluation methods. You will then work in a team to use design and prototyping techniques, creating a user-focussed solution to a given problem.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1  
2  
3  
4 Introduction to UX, whiteboard challenge
5 Stakeholders, Scenarios and Personas, Human Factors
6 Design Patterns, paper prototyping
7 Mobile UX
8 Digital and interactive prototyping, Product Design
9 Whiteboard challenge
10 Evaluation of design and interaction, Introduction to Service Design
11 Interactive prototype demonstrations
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 60% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 40% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Design report 5 7 20 20
Interactive prototype 8 11 30 30
Report 8 9 10 10

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Mr Andy Cobley

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC51011 " in the heading.


About the Module

This module looks at how we can store, manipulate and analyse big data. We define big data essentially as data that it non-atomic and is not well suited to tabular storage and manipulation. It is important to ensure that the students can understand why these two broad classes of data really are different and why they warrant such different treatment.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1  
2  
3  
4 Introduction to Big Data
5 Lambda design patterns
6 NoSQL
7 Hadoop
8 Hadoop
9 Erlang
10 Storm
11 Project Week
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
NoSQL presentation 4 7-8 20 10
Erlang 11 14 20 20
Hadoop essay       10

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC51039 " in the heading.


About the Module

This module explores theory in user experience, including design pattern, human factors, and evaluation methods. You will then work in a team to use design and prototyping techniques, creating a user-focussed solution to a given problem.


Credit Rating

There are 10 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1  
2  
3  
4 Introduction to UX, whiteboard challenge
5 Stakeholders, Scenarios and Personas, Human Factors
6 Design Patterns, paper prototyping
7 Mobile UX
8 Digital and interactive prototyping, Product Design
9  

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Design report 5 7 50 50
AAC essay 8 12 50 50

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Mr Andy Cobley

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC51041 " in the heading.


About the Module

This module explores modern practices for continual development and to explore how cloud services can be designed and deployed.You will learn about:

  • Defining continual deployment
  • Immutable services
  • The Cloud and its role in continual deployment
  • Methods doe developing a continual deployment solution
  • Microservices systems
  • Use of NoSQL

Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.


Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Iain Murray

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC52001" in the heading.


About the Module

This course aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the various database architectures and teach the theory and practice of database design. We will study the relational model of databases, both from the theoretical standpoint of understanding why it has become so important and from the more practical standpoint of how to design and build a database using this model. A practical illustration of the theory is given throughout the course. The database engine that will be used will be primarily MySQL; however alternative relational databases will be discussed.

Alternative database topics, including data warehouses, OLAP and data mining will also be covered.The aim is to give you a sound understanding of the principles of database design and for you to develop the ability to employ this understanding in building databases which will work correctly and efficiently in a real-world context.

The aim is to give you a sound understanding of the principles of database design and for you to develop the ability to employ this understanding in building databases which will work correctly and efficiently in a real-world context.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 Introduction/Review - Conceptual Database Design / ER Diagrams
2 Review - Physical Database Design / Guest lecture: Data Warehousing
3 Transactions / Views / Security
4 PHP as a database interface
5 Hypermedia and Graph Databases
6 Online Analytical Processing (OLAP)
7 Data mining
8 Data Visualisation
9 Multimedia Databases
10 Multimedia Databases
11 Revision
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Database Design  2  5  8 10
Database Implementation  6  10  16 25
Research report and presentation  6  9  5 5

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Keith Edwards

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC52002 " in the heading.


About the Module

The module continues on directly from AC51002. More complex programming problems are considered, involving the manipulation of fundamental data structures, and various important algorithms, for example for sorting and searching. The corresponding programs are implemented using C++.The module material is discussed in the lectures (three per week) and during the weekly computer laboratory sessions.When you have finished the module you will have a detailed knowledge of the principles of software development. You will be familiar with the most common data structures and algorithms, and the principles of object-oriented programming and data abstraction. You will have a more detailed knowledge of the C++ programming language, especially of classes and objects.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1 Review of classes and objects, stacks
2 Dynamic arrays, templates, queues, overloading
3 Abstract data types, pointers, linked lists
4 Destructors, copy constructors, linked lists implementation of stacks and queues, Linear and binary searching
5 Trees, implementation in C++, traversals, Binary search trees
6 AVL trees, Hashing
7 Sorting (simple methods), better sorting (heapsort, quicksort, mergesort, radixsort, lower bounds)
8 Derived classes, virtual functions, dynamic binding, polymorphism, abstract base classes, pure virtual functions
9 Graph algorithms (spanning trees, shortest parth)
10 Revision
11  
12  

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Programming assignment 1 2 5 24 20
Programming assignment 2 6 10 24 20

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr. Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC52008 " in the heading.


About the Module

Research Frontiers is a final year module which runs in the second semester. In this module, you will be exposed to highly focused areas of leading edge research in computing. You will gain a detailed understanding of computing research topics, which developing transferable skills connected with approaches to research and advanced development. AC52008 is a 20 credit module. It consists of two blocks; from which you will select topics to study. You will select a total of four units, two from the first block and two from the second block. The topics available will be indicated to you in a presentation at the end of semester 1. These will be drawn from the research expertise within computing.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered

1

Block 1

2

Block 1

3

Block 1

4

Block 1

5

Block 1

6

Block 2

7

Block 2

8

Block 2

9

Block 2

10

Block 2

11

 

12

 


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

Assignments will be made available within each option. The total coursework mark for each option is worth 25% of your overall grade.


Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Sasa Radomirovic.

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "Information Security" in the heading.


About the Module

The course aims to give a solid introduction to information security and touch upon important applications, evolving technologies, and new security threats.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Security Management: Confidentiality, Integrity, Availability; Risks, threats, and vulnerabilities
2 Web security and ethical hacking
3 Secret-key cryptography
4 Public-key cryptography
5 Key exchange protocols, SSL/TLS
6 Authentication protocols, passwords
7 Human Factors
8 Electronic cash
9 Bitcoin and blockchain technologies
10 Privacy
11 Revision
12 Revision

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Assignment 1 (Ethical hacking) 2 4 20 15
Applied Cryptography 8 8 20 15
Assignment 3 (Solutions to weekly exercises) 1 10 20 10

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed fromMy Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.


Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Keith Edwards

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC52010" in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of your project is to give you experience in carrying out an independent software development project which is the culmination of your year of study in Computing and relevant to your future career plans.

A typical project will contain all stages of the software development lifecycle and will be designed for usability. However, some projects, for example, more technical research-oriented projects, may lack some other these aspects and include others appropriate to the particular project.

You are responsible for the technical aspects and day-to-day management of your project. Your supervisor is there to provide guidance and advice and to monitor your progress. Every effort will be made to allocate you the project and supervisor of your choice but this is not always possible. If you want to discuss any general problems you are having with your project, please make an appointment to see the course co-ordinator.


Credit Rating

There are 60 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

The stages of your project should be discussed with your project supervisor in order to ensure that you have a sensible plan in place to complete all required outcomes of your specific project.


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments. For details of important dates and deliverables, see the MSc Project page. The main deliverables are:

  • Ethical approval
  • Demonstration
  • Final dissertation

Resources

The primary resource is your project supervisor, who can advise on specific reading you’re your individual topic. You will also find information on how to approach your project and the project requirements on the MSc Project Information page.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Alison Pease

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC52012" in the heading.


About the Module

The aim of this module is to provide you with an understanding and knowledge of research methods, relevant in the context of computing. You will learn about:

  • Quantitative methods
  • Qualitative methods
  • Empirical research methods
  • Project preparation
  • Research ethics
  • Research dissemination

Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekSubject
1 Introduction
2 Hypothesis Testing
3 Samples
4 Standard Deviation
5 Literature Search
6 Qualitative Data Collection
7 Qualitative Data Analysis
8 Good Practice in Computer Science
9 What is Scientific Research?
10 Revision
11 Independent Study
12 -

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignment so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Statistics assessment 2 5   15
Critical reading and discussion 1 6-9 (4 assessed reading seminars)   25

Resource List

All course material will be available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Mr Andy Cobley

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC52038" in the heading.


About the Module

This module aims to motivate for the need for Business Intelligence (BI) Systems. It will address the background and history of BI Systems development. Students will learn the distinction between characters, data, information and knowledge. You will learn about:

  • BI Systems
  • Data and Information
  • Problems with data
  • Data Warehousing, Dimensional Modelling, OLAP and Data Mining

Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignment so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Essay       15
Sun Model       25

Resource List

All course material will be available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Mr Andy Cobley

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see one of the lecturer(s):

Mr Andy Cobley, acobley@computing.dundee.ac.uk, 1.20 QMB

If you use email, please include "AC52039" in the heading.


About the Module

 

This module focuses mainly on the relational model and relational database design but it also includes other models and designs . It emphasises the principles of relational database theory that underpin the creation of successful multi-user, multi-table, transactional systems. The study of the relational model of databases will be both from the theoretical standpoint of understanding why it has become so important and from the more practical standpoint of how to design and build operational databases using this model.


Credit Rating

There are 20 Scotcat points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1  
2  
3  
4  
5  
6  
7  
8  
9  
10  
11  
12  
13  

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Mr Andy Cobley

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC52040" in the heading.


About the Module

This module aims to give students an awareness of dimensional modelling and design, as well as giving an introduction to other models and designs. Students will be introduced to how analytical requirements can be turned into a data model through the introduction of user, logical and physical models of analytical systems. You will learn about:

  • Physical Models
  • Star Schema
  • Hierarchical change
  • Speed of response
  • Implementation
  • BI architecture

Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Bitmap assignment       40

Resource List

All course material will be available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Mr Andy Cobley

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC51011 " in the heading.


About the Module

This module looks at how we can store, manipulate and analyse big data. We define big data essentially as data that it non-atomic and is not well suited to tabular storage and manipulation. It is important to ensure that the students can understand why these two broad classes of data really are different and why they warrant such different treatment.


Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Hadoop       20
Erlang       20

Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr. Rachel Menzies

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC52044" in the heading.


About the Module

Research Frontiers is a final year module which runs in the second semester. In this module, you will be exposed to highly focused areas of leading edge research in computing. You will gain a detailed understanding of computing research topics, which developing transferable skills connected with approaches to research and advanced development.

AC52044 is a 10 credit module. It consists of two blocks; from which you will select topics to study. You will select a total of two units, one from the first block and one from the second block.The topics available will be indicated to

The topics available will be indicated to you in a presentation at the end of semester 1. These will be drawn from the research expertise within computing.Note: For students on the MSc Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Note: For students on the MSc Augmentative and Alternative Communication programme, you will take (Block 1) Assistive Technology and (Block 2) Augmentative and Alternative Communication.


Credit Rating

There are 10 SCQF points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered

1

Block 1

2

Block 1

3

Block 1

4

Block 1

5

Block 1

6

Block 2

7

Block 2

8

Block 2

9

Block 2

10

Block 2

11

 

12

 


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignments so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

Assignments will be made available within each option. The total coursework mark for each option is worth 50% of your overall grade.


Resources

All course material is available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Mr Andy Cobley

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC52038" in the heading.


About the Module

This module aims to motivate for the need for Business Intelligence (BI) Systems. It will address the background and history of BI Systems development. Students will learn the distinction between characters, data, information and knowledge. You will learn about:

  • BI Systems
  • Data and Information
  • Problems with data
  • Data Warehousing, Dimensional Modelling, OLAP and Data Mining

Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignment so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Sun Model       20
ETL Project       80

Resource List

All course material will be available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Dr Keith Edwards

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see one of the lecturer(s):

Dr Keith Edwards, kjedwards@dundee.ac.uk, 2.20 QMB

If you use email, please include "AC53001" in the heading.


About the Module

 

Research Project


Credit Rating

There are 120 Scotcat points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1  
2  
3  
4  
5  
6  
7  
8  
9  
10  
11  
12  
13  

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Mr Andy Cobley

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC53005" in the heading.


About the Module

This module aims to give students an alternative method to SQL for querying and analysis: Multi-Dimensional eXpressions (MDX). It will examine the use of MDX for analysis of multi-dimensional data stored in OLAP cubes. You will learn about:

  • The language of analysis
  • Tuples versus sets
  • SQL versus MDX
  • Queries Versus data manipulation
  • MDX expressions

Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.

Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignment so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Essay       40
Writing MDX       60

Resource List

All course material will be available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Mr Andy Cobley

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see one of the lecturer(s):

Mr Andy Cobley, acobley@computing.dundee.ac.uk, 1.20 QMB

If you use email, please include "AC53006" in the heading.


About the Module

 

Description


Credit Rating

There are 20 Scotcat points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1  
2  
3  
4  
5  
6  
7  
8  
9  
10  
11  
12  
13  

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.


Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Miss Shazia Akbar

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see one of the lecturer(s):

Miss Shazia Akbar, shaziaakbar@computing.dundee.ac.uk, 1.05 QMB

If you use email, please include "AC53007" in the heading.


About the Module

 

This module aims to provide the student with a professional level experience of specifying conducting and presenting a substantial piece of user experience research.


Credit Rating

There are 60 Scotcat points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1  
2  
3  
4  
5  
6  
7  
8  
9  
10  
11  
12  
13  

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Mr Andy Cobley

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see one of the lecturer(s):

Mr Andy Cobley, acobley@computing.dundee.ac.uk, 1.20 QMB

If you use email, please include "AC53008" in the heading.


About the Module

 

This module is design to develop students’ practical skills in implementing a business intelligence system, learning to apply theory into practice.


Credit Rating

There are 20 Scotcat points available on this module.


Module Timetable

WeekTopics Covered
1  
2  
3  
4  
5  
6  
7  
8  
9  
10  
11  
12  
13  

Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Mr Andy Cobley

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module, or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC53009" in the heading.


About the Module

This module aims to give students an understanding of data generation, describing patterns in data, the importance of statistics and data visualisation and the common mistakes made when analysing this data. You will learn about:

  • Patterns in data
  • Types of data
  • Descriptive statistics
  • Statistical testing
  • Data mining
  • Methodology and Process
  • Classifications and descriptions
  • Industry Standards
  • Delivering information
  • Visualisation of data & information
  • Importance of good interface design

Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 100% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 0% of the final module mark.

Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignment, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
D3 Programming       30
Final project       70

Resource List

All course material will be available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.

Organisation

The Module Co-Ordinator is Mr Andy Cobley.

If you want to talk about an aspect of the module or your work on it, please make an appointment to see the lecturer.

If you use email, please include "AC11001 " in the heading.


About the Module

This module aims to compare and contrast different statistical techniques to solve complex analytical problems. Students will consider Bayesian statistical and dealing with outliers, type 1 and type 3 errors, false positives and other statistical analysis traps. You will learn about:

  • Advanced statistical techniques, when to use them and the pitfalls they create
  • Introduction to R and its use with database technologies
  • Data mining techniques.

Credit Rating

There are 20 SCQF points available on this module.


Assessment and Coursework

Coursework counts for 40% of the final module mark.
The final degree exam counts for 60% of the final module mark.


Assignments

Marking criteria are provided on My Dundee for all assignment, so that you know what we are looking for when we are marking your coursework. Please ensure that you refer to these when completing assignments.

TitleWeek GivenWeek DueEffort Expected (hours)Value (%)
Monte Carlo       40

Resource List

All course material will be available on My Dundee. This includes copies of lecture materials, practical exercises, and assignments. The reading list for this module can be accessed from My Dundee, and provides recommended materials for completing the module.