Spanish Certificate

  • For Entry: September, Jan/Feb, Apr/May
  • Duration: 6, 11 or 22 weeks
  • School: School of Humanities

Spanish is the  second most spoken language in the world and also one of the six official languages of the United Nations. Learn it from scratch or develop your skills on this Languages for All, evening course.

Why study Spanish?

Spanish is the main language of over 400 million people. Discover the  fascinating and varied Hispanic heritage for personal interest, employment or leisure.

Spanish is an official language in 20 sovereign states and one dependent entity:

  • Argentina
  • Bolivia
  • Chile
  • Colombia
  • Costa Rica
  • Cuba
  • Dominican Republic
  • Ecuador
  • El Salvador
  • Equatorial Guinea
  • Guatemala
  • Honduras
  • Mexico
  • Nicaragua
  • Panama
  • Paraguay
  • Peru
  • Puerto Rico
  • Spain
  • Uruguay
  • Venezuela

Legend:

  Countries where Spanish has official status.
  Countries and U.S. states where Spanish has no official status but is spoken by 25% or more of the population.
  Countries and U.S. states where Spanish has no official status but is spoken by 10-20% of the population.
  Countries and U.S. states where Spanish has no official status but is spoken by 5-9.9% of the population.

 

Languages for All at Dundee

This course is part of the Languages for All programme at Dundee, offering everyone the opportunity to study a language, whether for personal or professional reasons.

Classes are taught in the evening and you can choose from a wide range of languages, many of which are available at different levels.

Visit the Languages website for the full list of languages available.

Benefits of studying with us include use of library facilities with language-specific support material, and our Languages Film Club.

 

University of Dundee Students ...

If you are a student at the University of Dundee, you can also join a Languages for All course:

  • undergraduates on many degrees can take an accredited, 22-week, Languages for All course in place of one of their 20-credit modules, at Levels 1 & 2, and there is no cost,
  • postgraduates studying an MLitt (masters) degree, if you need to acquire or improve your foreign language skills to enhance your postgraduate studies, (eg to read texts in a native language), then you can enrol on a Languages for All course at no cost,
  • all students can enrol on Languages for All courses in additional to their main area of study, at the student rates.

Study Options

6 weeks, non-accredited study

You can study our short (six-week) courses, which start Jan/Feb or Apr/May each year. These are aimed at beginners looking to get started in a language, or for those who have been studying with us all year, who want to continue language learning during the summer period.

You will obtain a certificate of attendance and completion, subject to a minimum of 75% attendance.

11/22 weeks, non-accredited study

You can study for one or two semesters (11 weeks each semester) on a non-accredited basis. You will obtain a certificate of attendance and completion, subject to a minimum of 75% attendance. 

You attend the same classes as the students registered for accredited study.

22 weeks accredited study

You study for two semesters (22 weeks), and complete formal assessments.

On successful completion you receive a University of Dundee Certificate in Modern Languages, worth 20 credits at SCQF Levels 7/8.

Accredited classes are eligible for a Part-Time Free grant from SAAS and ILA funding, depending on your circumstances.

Timetable

Beginners - Stage 1 - from September 2014 Tuesday 7.00 - 9.00 pm
Beginners - Stage 1 - from September 2014 Thursday 5.00 - 7.00 pm
Beginners (short course) - from February 2015 Tuesday 6.00 - 7.30 pm
Beginners (short course) - from April 2015 Monday 6.00 - 7.30 pm
Post beginners (short course) - from April 2015 Tuesday 6.00 - 7.30 pm
Lower Intermediate - Stage 2 - from September 2014 Wednesday 6.00 - 8.00 pm
Intermediate (short course) - April 2015 Thursday 6.00 - 7.30 pm
Intermediate - Stage 3 - from September 2014 Monday 6.00 - 8.00 pm
Upper Intermediate - Stage 4 - from September 2014 Wednesday 6.00 - 8.00 pm
Advanced - Stage 5 - from September 2014 Wednesday 6.00 - 8.00 pm
Advanced - Stage 6/7 - from September 2014 Wednesday 5.30 - 7.30 pm
Advanced+ (short course) - April 2015 Wednesday 6.00 - 7.30 pm

Find out more

Use the tabs at the top of the page to find out more:

  • Course content is on the "What You'll Study" tab.
  • Find out which level of study would suit you on the "Entry Requirements" tab.
  • Check the "Fees & Funding" tab above for details of the fees for these options, and grants available. 
  • How to pay information is given on the "Your Application" tab.

Good mixture of class activities for vocabulary/translation/grammar. Good integration of audio visual materials, eg youtube which always highlights interesting/contemporary topics. Tutor is helpful and supportive. Generates a relaxed and friendly atmosphere in class.

Related Courses

The full course last for 22 weeks, starting in September.

You can join a non-accredited course for 11 weeks, starting in September or Jan/Feb.

Short courses run for 6 weeks starting in Jan/Feb or Apr/May.

Find out more below about the content of the different stages.

Our emphasis is on:

  • fostering communicative competence,
  • linguistic knowledge, and
  • intercultural awareness

Speaking in class is our main priority, but reading, listening and writing skills are also taught, using authentic audio and written materials and on-line resources.

Course Content

Topics:

  • Personal information
  • food and drink
  • travel and transport
  • social language
  • accommodation abroad
  • likes and dislikes
  • leisure activities
  • home and family
  • shopping
  • jobs etc.

Grammar: Present tense, simple past, immediate future in indicative mood (including reflexive forms); negation; personal pronouns; interrogation; possessive adjectives and pronouns; common adjectives; agreements; number and gender of nouns; common prepositions; common adverbs; awareness of formal and informal usage.

Learning outcomes

  • communicate simply in the spoken language in a range of everyday situations in such a way that basic daily requirements can be met
  • understand some specific details of simple everyday aural and written messages (e.g. postcard, e-mails)
  • recognise and use some of the basic features of the grammatical system of the language, and use a bilingual dictionary confidently
  • use a small range of 'repair strategies' to overcome communication breakdown in a range of basic everyday situations
  • describe some differences between own language and culture and target language and culture
  • use language skills at a level of A1, as described in the Council of Europe Common European Framework (CEF).

Course Content

Topics:

  • Personal information
  • daily routine
  • food and drink
  • travel and transport
  • social language
  • accommodation abroad
  • likes and dislikes
  • leisure activities
  • home and family
  • shopping
  • jobs
  • health
  • geography and weather
  • education, etc.

Grammar: Revision/introduction of: the present, past and future in indicative mood (including reflexive forms); negation; pronouns (personal, demonstrative, possessive); interrogation; possessive and demonstrative adjectives; agreements between nouns and adjectives; number and gender of nouns; a range of main prepositions; adverbs and some adverbial phrases of time and place; conjunctions; formal and informal usage.

Learning outcomes

  • communicate satisfactorily in the spoken language in a range of everyday social and transactional situations
  • communicate satisfactorily in the written language in basic informal situations (notes, informal letters)
  • understand the main points and specific details of simple aural and written messages
  • recognise and use the basic features of the grammatical system of the language, and to use a bilingual dictionary competently
  • use a range of 'repair strategies' to overcome communication breakdown
  • describe some of the main differences between own language and culture and target language and culture
  • use language skills at a level of A1 (all skills areas) and selected skills areas of A2, as described in the Council of Europe Common European Framework (CEF).

Course Content

Topics:

  • Giving/asking for information
  • expressing likes and dislikes
  • asking for/giving times, prices, and dimensions
  • giving detailed descriptions
  • reporting events
  • asking for/ giving directions
  • giving explanations
  • talking about one's job/studies
  • making comparisons
  • asking for/giving an opinion
  • agreeing/disagreeing
  • complaining
  • giving advice
  • arranging dates, meetings
  • summarising texts etc.

Grammar: Revision/introduction of: the main tenses in the indicative mood; basic active and passive voices; pronouns (personal, demonstrative, possessive, reflexive); nouns: gender, singular, plural; case endings in main contexts; prepositions; modals and auxiliaries; declension of adjectives/ adjectival agreement; comparison of adjectives; some principles of word formation; word order; adverbial phrases of time, manner, place; conjunctions; formation of verbs; negation; questions.

Learning outcomes

  • communicate adequately in a range of social, transactional and work-related situations
  • understand the main points and specific details of everyday aural and written messages and texts
  • write short everyday messages and simple letters/e-mails (informal and formal)
  • recognise and use the basic features of the grammar confidently and accurately, and to be aware of more complex features of the language system; and to use a bilingual dictionary competently
  • use a range of 'repair strategies' to overcome communication breakdown
  • describe differences between own language and culture and target language and culture
  • use language skills at a level of A2 (all skills areas) and selected skills areas of B1 (as described in the Council of Europe Common European Framework (CEF).

Course Content

Topics:

  • Personal information
  • daily routine
  • food and drink
  • travel and transport
  • social language
  • accommodation abroad
  • likes and dislikes
  • leisure activities
  • home and family
  • shopping and consumerism
  • jobs and work
  • health
  • geography and climate
  • education
  • the environment
  • the media and manipulation
  • politics
  • current affairs and events etc.

Grammar: Revision/introduction of: the main grammatical features of the language, to include most tenses in the present, past, future (in indicative mood) and the conditional mood; active and passive voices; and some tenses in the subjunctive mood (where relevant); pronouns (personal, possessive, demonstrative, reflexive); a range of prepositions; adverbs and adverbial phrases; adjectives and adjectival phrases, comparison of adjectives; conjunctions; infinitive constructions; formal and informal usage.

Learning outcomes

  • communicate adequately in a range of social, transactional and work-related situations
  • understand the main points and specific details of everyday aural and written messages and texts; and also the main points of more complex texts (such as reports, newspaper articles etc.)
  • write everyday messages and simple letters, simple business correspondence and factual texts
  • provide translations of simple texts into English
  • recognise and use the main features of the grammar with confidence;
  • use a bilingual dictionary competently
  • use a range of 'repair strategies' to overcome communication breakdown
  • describe a range of differences between own language and culture and target language and culture
  • use language skills at a level of B1 (all skills areas) and selected skills areas of B2, as described in the Council of Europe Common European Framework (CEF).

Course Content

Topics:

  • Personal information
  • daily routine
  • food and drink
  • travel and transport
  • social language
  • accommodation abroad
  • likes and dislikes
  • leisure activities
  • home and family
  • shopping and consumerism
  • jobs and work
  • health
  • geography and climate
  • education
  • the environment
  • the media and manipulation
  • politics
  • current affairs and events etc.

Grammar: Revision/introduction of: all the main grammatical features of the language, to include most tenses in the present, past, future (in indicative mood) and the conditional mood; active and passive voices; and some tenses in the subjunctive mood (where relevant); pronouns (personal, possessive, demonstrative, reflexive); a range of prepositions; adverbs and adverbial phrases; adjectives and adjectival phrases, comparison of adjectives; conjunctions; infinitive constructions; formal and informal usage. - communicate adequately in a range of social, transactional and work-related situations

Learning outcomes

  • understand the main points and specific details of everyday aural and written messages and texts, and complex written material such as reports, newspaper articles, literary texts etc.;
  • write everyday messages and letters, business correspondence and factual texts
  • provide translations of simple texts into English
  • recognise and use appropriately a wide range of linguistic structures
  • use a bilingual dictionary competently
  • use a range of 'repair strategies' to overcome communication breakdown
  • use language skills at a level of B2 (all skills areas) and selected skills areas of C1, as described in the Council of Europe Common European Framework (CEF).

Course Content

Topics:

  • Current affairs and events, including major European developments
  • Contemporary cultural, social and ethical issues (e.g. education, immigration, xenophobia, terrorism, non-traditional families, the status of women, technological advances)
  • films, literature, key historical events.

Grammar: All the main grammatical features and tenses of the language in complex contexts, active and passive; pronouns; adverbs and adverbial phrases; adjectives and adjectival phrases, conjunctions; prepositions; infinitive constructions; formal, informal, colloquial usage etc.

Learning outcomes

  • use and reflect on an extensive range of vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • communicate in an extensive range of contexts, using speaking, listening, reading and writing skills, either in Britain or abroad
  • demonstrate a high level of transferable presentation skills
  • demonstrate a high level of intercultural awareness between the culture(s) of their chosen target language and their own
  • conduct independent investigative and analytical project work in the target language
  • research, analyse and evaluate effectively material from a wide range of sources.
  • provide accurate and readable English translations of a range of texts
  • use their language skills at a level of C1 (all skill areas) as described in the Council of Europe Common European Framework.
  • use language skills at a level of C1 (all skills areas) as described in the Council of Europe Common European Framework (CEF).

Course Content

Topics:

  • Current affairs and events, including major European developments
  • contemporary cultural, social and ethical issues
  • films, literature, key historical events.

Grammar: All the main grammatical features and tenses of the language in complex contexts, active and passive; pronouns; adverbs and adverbial phrases; adjectives and adjectival phrases, conjunctions; prepositions; infinitive constructions; formal, informal, colloquial usage etc.

Learning outcomes

  • use and reflect on an extensive range of vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • communicate in an extensive range of contexts, using speaking, listening, reading and writing skills, either in Britain or abroad
  • demonstrate a high level of transferable presentation skills
  • demonstrate a high level of intercultural awareness between the culture(s) of their chosen target language and their own
  • conduct independent investigative and analytical project work in the target language
  • research, analyse and evaluate effectively material from a wide range of sources.
  • provide accurate and readable English translations of a range of texts
  • use their language skills at a level of C1 (all skill areas) as described in the Council of Europe Common European Framework.
  • use language skills at a level of C1 (all skills areas) as described in the Council of Europe Common European Framework (CEF).

If you are taking this as an accredited course, there are several formal assessments, which include a reading/writing portfolio, a listening test and an oral assessment.

There are no assessments if you are registered on the non-accredited course.

You can progress through the stages of our Spanish courses. We also offer a range of Spanish modules as part of our on-campus undergraduate courses, and by distance learning.

Use this checklist to assess your current language skills to help you decide which stage is best for you.

Be honest and realistic!  If you start in a class which is at too low a level, you may get bored and frustrated.  If you join a class which is at too high a level, you may struggle to keep up.

Stage 1

Do you have little or no knowledge of the language? AND

  • would like to gain a University Certificate at the end of the course? AND / OR
  • know only some simple phrases such as ‘Hello/Goodbye / How are you?/Please, Thank you/Excuse me’? AND / OR
  • can introduce yourself and talk simply about your self/ family? eg. 'I am a student, I live in Dundee' . . . etc.

If you answered YES to most of these questions this is the right level for you!

If you know more than this, proceed to the next Stage.

Stage 2

Have you already learned some of this language either at school or a previous adult education class? AND

  • can you talk about your likes and dislikes?: 'I don’t like white wine, I prefer beer' . . . etc.
  • are you familiar with numbers up to at least 100?
  • can you order food and drinks in a restaurant, ask for tickets or book a room/table?, eg. 'I would like to book a table for 7.30 tonight'
  • can you write a holiday postcard?
  • do you have a basic knowledge of grammatical structures?

If you answered YES to most of these questions in addition to those for Stage 1, this is the right level for you!

If you know more than this, proceed to the next Stage.

Stage 3

Do you have a good Standard Grade/’O’ Grade/GCSE or have you attended adult education classes? AND / OR

  • have you spent a short time living in a country where the target language is spoken? AND
  • could you go shopping for clothes and ask for and describe what you want (colour, size, bigger, smaller, etc.) ? AND
  • could you talk or write in some detail about where you went on holiday last year and what you did? AND
  • could you talk or write about what you’re going to do next week?
  • do you have a general knowledge of basic grammar?

If you answered YES to most of these questions in addition to these for Stage 2 this is the right level for you!

If you know more than this, proceed to the next Stage.

Stage 4

Do you have a good, recent Higher/AS Level or a rusty ‘A’ Level or have you attended adult education classes? AND / OR

  • have you spent some time living in a country where the target language is spoken? AND / OR
  • can you understand large numbers (eg 25,000/1996) when spoken at a natural native speaker level?
  • can you talk or write about different jobs/professions and give opinions?
  • can you use a range of tenses in your speech and writing? (past, present, future, conditional)

If you answered YES to most of these questions in addition to those for Stage 3, this is the right level for you!

If you know more than this, proceed to the next Stage.

Stage 5

Do you have a good ‘A’ level/Advanced Higher? OR Have you attended adult education classes or lived in a country where the language is spoken AND / OR

  • can you arrange social events, holidays etc. confidently by telephone?
  • can you discuss current affairs to a limited extent?
  • can you use a wide range of tenses/moods in your speech and writing? (past, present, future, conditional, subjunctive)
  • can you understand most of what is said in conversations between native speakers?

If you answered YES to most of these questions in addition to those for Stage 4, this is the right level for you!

If you know more than this, proceed to the next Stage.

Stage 6

Have you studied the language over a period of many years, or at University? Have you attended adult education classes to an advanced level or lived in a country where the language is spoken AND / OR

  • can you sustain a conversation, with some hesitation, on a variety of subjects?
  • can you follow most of the news on television/radio?
  • can you read articles from newspapers/magazines/internet without consulting a dictionary (much!) and write on a variety of topics, in a variety of registers eg. formal letters, etc.?

If you answered YES to most of these questions in addition to those for Stage 5, this is the right level for you!

If you know more than this, proceed to the next Stage.

Stage 7

Are you already fluent in the language and would like to practice in order to maintain your fluency?

If you answered YES, this is the right level for you.

Not sure?

If you are still unsure, please Contact Us.

Fees for courses starting in the academic year 2014/15

CourseOne SemesterBoth Semesters
Accredited courses   £270 for the public
£220 for students*
£220 for University of Dundee staff
£220 for over 60's retired
(22 weeks)
Non-accredited courses £130 (11 weeks)

£220 (22 weeks)

January Classes £75 (6 weeks)  
Spring/Summer Classes £75 (6 weeks)  

Only receipt of payment guarantees a place on a course.

* Please note: Students taking 20 credits in Languages for All as part of their degrees/pathways do not have to pay LfA fees in addition to their main tuition fees.

Part-Time Fee Grant

Accredited classes are eligible for a Part-Time Free grant from SAAS.

Please contact the Languages for All office for further details.

Individual Learning Accounts (ILA)

University of Dundee is registered as a Learning Provider with ILA Scotland. This means that you can apply for an Individual Learning Account to help you pay for language courses.

If your personal income is £22,000 or less per year, or you are on certain benefits, you may be eligible for up to £200 a year of funding towards your learning. Our accredited language courses are approved for £200 ILA funding.

ILAs can only be used in September for year long courses. It is extremely important that an ILA account is opened and active prior to the course start date, therefore early registration with ILA is strongly advisable as this process can take several weeks.

To find out more and to open an account, call the ILA Scotland helpline free on 0808 100 1090 or visit the ILA website at www.ilascotland.org.uk.

Note: If an individual enrols on a course using an Individual Learning Account to pay the course fees but fails to attend the course, or if an ILA account isn’t opened and active prior to the course start date, an invoice will be issued for the outstanding fee balance of the course with an administration charge of £10 incurring.

The information below does not apply to Short Courses ...

There have been many changes to the arrangements for funding students entering higher education in recent years, yet a degree from the University of Dundee, with its high rate of employment success, remains a cost-effective option.

The fees you pay will depend on your fee status. Your fee status is determined by us using the information you provide on your application. Find out more about fee status.

Fee categoryFees for students starting 2015
Scottish students
Rest of UK students
EU students
Overseas students (non-EU)

Scottish and EU students can apply to the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) to have tuition fees paid by the Scottish Government.

Rest of the UK students can apply for financial assistance, including a loan to cover the full cost of the tuition fees, from the Student Loans Company.

Tuition fees for Overseas (non-EU) students are guaranteed for the length of your course. This means that the tuition fee you pay in your first year (shown above) is the same fee you will pay for each year of your course. We guarantee that this will not increase while you are studying with us. The only exceptions to this are our MBChB Medicine, BSc Medical Sciences and BDS Dentistry degrees which charge a different tuition for the clinical years.

There are a number of ways you can enrol in a Languages for All course at Dundee:

Online

Our preferred method of enrolment is online via the University's secure online store

By debit or credit card

If you call on 01382 384535 or 385488 (9.00 am - 4.30 pm), you can pay by card over the phone.

By post

For full year courses: download, print out and complete the 2014-15 Languages for All enrolment form

For Spring-Summer courses: download, print out and complete the form at the end of the Spring/Summer Short Course booklet

Then send by post to:

Languages, School of Humanities
University of Dundee
Nethergate
Dundee

DD1 4HN

In person

Drop in and sign up at the School of Humanities Office, 1st floor, Tower Building, University of Dundee  (between 9.00 am and 4.30 pm) to pay by credit/debit card.

 

It is advisable to enrol early to avoid disappointment.  Only receipt of payment guarantees a place on the course.

Languages for All Advice / Registration Session

Thinking of learning a new language, or improving an existing one? Come along to our Languages for All Advice / Registration Session, Sat 12th September 2015, 1-3pm, Humanities Reception, 1st Floor Tower Building.

Cancellations & Refunds

We reserve the right to cancel classes when enrolments are insufficient.

Where more than one class is offered in the same language at the same level, we reserve the right to merge classes if numbers fall short of the minimum requirements.

A refund will only be possible if the course has been over-subscribed, is cancelled or the date of withdrawal from the course precedes the start date of the course.



Degree UCAS Code
Spanish CertificateDIRECT-2014