Finance BFin / BIFin

  • For Entry: September
  • UCAS Code: N300
  • Duration: 4 years
  • College: Arts & Social Sciences
  • School: Business

A degree in Finance or International Finance will equip you with the basic skills and techniques that are necessary to embark on a career in the financial sector - a sector in which many of our staff have practical experience.

Our degrees have been designed to offer exemptions from a number of professional bodies in the UK. This can help you to find a job at the end of your studies because you are exempt from some of the examinations which these organisations require entrants to take.

Why study Finance at Dundee?

At Dundee we aim to help you develop the skills and techniques needed for a variety of exciting careers in finance. The term finance is normally used to refer to the management of money and a major part of modern finance study involves examining the way in which large corporations use their funds to generate income and wealth in the future. The programme emphasises the role played by capital markets both in the UK and overseas in this wealth creation process and highlights their importance in the global economy.

Students studying finance are taught by staff who have either practical experience working in the financial sector or who have gained insights into financial practices through research of analysts, company directors and market traders. These insights from practice help inform the teaching of finance at Dundee.

Our staff are committed to providing a stimulating, supportive and friendly environment for students.

BFin or BIFin?

Where the BFin (Bachelor of Finance) addresses financial issues relating to UK and Irish companies, the BIFin (Bachelor of International Finance) will provide you with the necessary analytical skills to understand the environment within which multinational firms operate. It will also enable you to understand how these firms select, assess, and finance their projects internationally and provide you with a foundation to appreciate how financial risks are managed by international firms.

We aim to show you how vital the financial sector is both in the UK and overseas. We will show you all aspects of the financing process from the raising of funds by companies through to the complex operation of, and links between, different capital markets.

What's so good about Finance at Dundee?

Student visits

We organise student visits to the financial centres of both London and Edinburgh to help you appreciate the 'real world' application of the discipline.

Professional accreditation

The BFin is an accredited degree and allows exemptions from professional examinations from the following bodies:

  • The Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA)
  • The Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA)
  • The Association of International Accountants (AIA)

The BFin degree is also likely to gain exemption from certain professional examinations of the following bodies:

  • The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Scotland (ICAS)
  • The Institute of Chartered Accountants of England and Wales (ICAEW)
  • The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ireland (ICAI)
  • The Chartered Institute of Bankers in Scotland (CIOBS)

Transatlantic Student Exchange scheme

Finance students may also apply to spend a year of their degree in Canada or North America on the Transatlantic Student Exchange scheme or a semester in Australia or Hong Kong.

Dundee University School of Business Society (DUSBS)

All new students are encouraged to join our School of Business Society.

The Society arranges a number of social and other events including a welcome party for new students, an Annual Ball and careers presentations from visiting firms.

Student life in the School of Accounting & Finance »

Degree Combinations

  • International Finance BIFin

Related Courses

This course is taught by staff based in the School of Business.

Our programmes are delivered using a variety of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, projects and hands-on computer labs. Assessment is by a mixture of coursework (for example, an essay), computer labs, projects based on group assignments and exams.

In Level 1 and 2 of the BFin and the BIFin, three subjects are delivered per semester, each having approximately 5 hours of classes. Consequently, there is approximately 15 hours of contact time from Monday to Friday of each week. We expect students to undertake an additional 20 hours of individual study per week to prepare for classes and revise material covered in lectures or tutorials.

Honours Degree

An honours degree normally takes four years, full time, you study levels 1-4, as described below.

Advanced Entry Honours Degree

It is possible to study for the BFin honours degrees in 3 years (levels 2-4 below), if you have the required grades and subjects as listed in the Entry Requirements section. There are definite advantages to considering this route as the time needed to study is reduced by one year which enables you to start working and earning earlier.

Level 1
  • Introductory Financial Accounting - where the basic concepts of accounting practice, including bookkeeping and the production of external financial reports, are introduced
  • Introductory Management Accounting - where students are introduced to the foundations of costing and accounting for planning and control
  • Statistics - where statistical methods such as probability theory and regression analysis are presented, as well as other quantitative techniques relevant to modern business activity
  • Information Systems - provides hands-on experience of the modern software applications relevant to accounting and finance as well as introducing students to some of the theoretical concepts relevant to the processing of information in large organisations.
  • Global Economic Perspectives - uses practical examples to illustrate how economic principles apply to real world situations, for example the manner in which modern competitive markets operate.
  • Foundations of Economic Analysis - introduces students to fundamental economic concepts such as pricing theory, resource allocation and fiscal policy.
Level 2

The modules in Level 2 are designed to build on and develop the theoretical and practical material covered at Level 1.

  • Intermediate Financial Accounting - builds on Level 1 by introducing students to UK regulatory requirements and some key contemporary accounting issues such as accounting for goodwill
  • Intermediate Financial Management - builds on some of the material covered in Level 1 by introducing students to techniques used in practice to appraise financial and capital investments as well as discussing working capital management and long-term fund raising
  • Financial Decision Analysis - examines the modern techniques used in financial decision analysis including linear programming, queuing and inventory modelling
  • Microeconomics - builds on the material by considering topics such as business interaction in competitive markets and the link between corporate decisions and the cost of goods and services.
  • Macroeconomics and Economic Statistics - adds depth to the issues covered in Level 1 by introducing students to the debate about appropriate monetary and fiscal policies as well as explaining the methods used in analysing open economies. This module also comprises a section on the use of statistical techniques in economic analysis.
  • Management and Information Systems - discusses contemporary management theories and case studies as well as developing the information technology skills and systems theory introduced in Level 1.
    The fifth and sixth modules build on the economics modules from Level 1.
Level 3

Performance in the first two Levels helps to determine whether students are offered the chance to study for the Honours version of the degree (awarded after four years) or the non-Honours version (awarded after three years). In both cases, the material builds directly on issues covered in earlier years. Students taking both the Honours and the non-Honours versions of the degree take five modules at Level 3. Honours students proceed to take a range of compulsory and elective modules at Level 4.

  • Microeconomic Analysis
  • Advanced Financial Management
  • International Capital Markets
  • Taxation
  • Econometrics
Level 4
  • Financial Management Theory
  • Financial Economic Analysis

plus

  • Three optional modules with at least two optional modules at Level 4

Level 4 modules may include:

  • Social & Environmental Accounting
  • Financial Statement Analysis
  • Security Analysis and Portfolio Management
  • Dissertation
  • Fiscal Studies
  • Advanced Management and Information Systems
  • Government and Business
  • Economics of Globalisation
  • Business Strategy
  • International Finance

(Not all options will be available in any one year).

Honours Degree

An honours degree normally takes four years, full time, you study levels 1-4, as described below.

Advanced Entry Honours Degree

It is possible to study for the BIFin honours degrees in 3 years (levels 2-4 below), if you have the required grades and subjects as listed in the Entry Requirements section. There are definite advantages to considering this route as the time needed to study is reduced by one year which enables you to start working and earning earlier.

Level 1
  • Introductory Financial Accounting - where the basic concepts of accounting practice, including bookkeeping and the production of external financial reports, are introduced
  • Introductory Management Accounting - where students are introduced to the foundations of costing and accounting for planning and control
  • Statistics - where statistical methods such as probability theory and regression analysis are presented, as well as other quantitative techniques relevant to modern business activity
  • Information Systems - provides hands-on experience of the modern software applications relevant to accounting and finance as well as introducing students to some of the theoretical concepts relevant to the processing of information in large organisations.
  • Global Economic Perspectives - uses practical examples to illustrate how economic principles apply to real world situations, for example the manner in which modern competitive markets operate.
  • Foundations of Economic Analysis - introduces students to fundamental economic concepts such as pricing theory, resource allocation and fiscal policy.
Level 2

The modules in Level 2 are designed to build on and develop the theoretical and practical material covered at Level 1.

  • Intermediate Financial Accounting - builds on Level 1 by introducing students to UK regulatory requirements and some key contemporary accounting issues such as accounting for goodwill
  • Intermediate Financial Management - builds on some of the material covered in Level 1 by introducing students to techniques used in practice to appraise financial and capital investments as well as discussing working capital management and long-term fund raising
  • Financial Decision Analysis - examines the modern techniques used in financial decision analysis including linear programming, queuing and inventory modelling
  • Microeconomics - builds on the material by considering topics such as business interaction in competitive markets and the link between corporate decisions and the cost of goods and services.
  • Macroeconomics and Economic Statistics - adds depth to the issues covered in Level 1 by introducing students to the debate about appropriate monetary and fiscal policies as well as explaining the methods used in analysing open economies. This module also comprises a section on the use of statistical techniques in economic analysis.
  • International Accounting and Finance
Level 3

Performance in the first two Levels helps to determine whether students are offered the chance to study for the Honours version of the degree (awarded after four years) or the non-Honours version (awarded after three years). In both cases, the material builds directly on issues covered in earlier years. Students taking both the Honours and the non-Honours versions of the degree take five modules at Level 3. Honours students proceed to take a range of compulsory and elective modules at Level 4.

  • Microeconomic Analysis
  • Advanced Financial Management
  • International Capital Markets
  • Taxation
  • Macroeconomic Analysis
Level 4
  • Financial Management Theory
  • International Finance

plus

  • Three optional modules with at least two optional modules at Level 4

Level 4 modules may include:

  • Social & Environmental Accounting
  • Financial Statement Analysis
  • Security Analysis and Portfolio Management
  • Dissertation
  • Fiscal Studies
  • Advanced Management and Information Systems
  • Government and Business
  • Economics of Globalisation
  • Business Strategy
  • Financial Economic Analysis

(Not all options will be available in any one year)

The weightings allocated to assessed coursework and the final examination vary from module to module. Typically 80% is allocated to the final exam but this is less in some modules and more in others.

Our programmes were developed after discussions with employers and are tailored to the theoretical and practical issues most relevant to the modern financial environment.

The BFin and BIFin can enhance your employability by developing your numeracy and analytical abilities, enhancing your IT skills and improving your interpersonal and communication skills. Many students go on to work in the financial services sector either as analysts, fund managers or on the trading floors of investment banks. A large number take professional examinations such as those of the Chartered Institute of Bankers in Scotland or the Chartered Financial Analyst Association.

The BFin and the BIFin degrees act as an excellent stepping stone into both of these professions, but also cover much of the material required for a number of other professional financial qualifications, including the professional accountancy bodies.

In addition, a number of visiting guest speakers, drawn from practice, are invited to talk about the investment trust sector specifically and the fund management industry in general.

The following are the minimum requirements, please note qualifications have to be obtained at the first sitting of examinations.

Please note that the entry requirements in our printed prospectus may be subject to change. The entry requirements listed below are up to date and should be referred to in case of any discrepancy.

Courses starting September 2015

Level 1 Entry

Qualification Minimum Grade Typical Grade
SQA Higher BBBC ABBB
GCE A-Level BCC BBB
ILC Higher ABBB
IB Diploma 30 points (including 5, 5, 5 at Higher Level)
Essential Subjects English and Mathematics at Standard Grade at 2, National 5/Intermediate 2 at C, GCSE at B, ILC Ordinary at B, IB Subsidiary Level at 5
EU & International Visit our Your Country webpages for entry requirements tailored to your home country
Other Qualifications
SQA A relevant HNC with B in the Graded Unit
Scottish Baccalaureate Pass with CC at AH
SWAP Access
EDEXCEL A relevant BTEC Extended Diploma with DDM
A relevant HND with Merits in appropriate modules
Advanced Diploma Grade B with ASL-A Level at B
Welsh Baccalaureate Pass with A-Levels at BB
European Baccalaureate

Courses starting September 2015

Advanced Entry (to Level 2)

Qualification Grade
SQA Advanced Higher BBB
GCE A-Level BBB
IB Diploma 30 points (including 5, 5, 5 at Higher Level)
Essential Subjects Mathematics, Economics and Accounting (AH or A-Level or IB Higher Level) and English at Standard Grade at 2, National 5/Intermediate 2 at C, GCSE at B, ILC Ordinary at B, IB Subsidiary Level at 5
EU & International
Other Qualifications
SQA A relevant HND with BB in the Graded Units
Scottish Baccalaureate
SWAP Access
EDEXCEL
Advanced Diploma
Welsh Baccalaureate
European Baccalaureate

There have been many changes to the arrangements for funding students entering higher education in recent years, yet a degree from the University of Dundee, with its high rate of employment success, remains a cost-effective option.

The fees you pay will, in most cases, depend on your current country of residence.

The fee shown is annual, and may be subject to an increase each year.

Fee categoryFees for students starting September 2015
Scottish students £1,820 per year of study (for Sept 2014 entry). Fees for September 2015 will be confirmed by the Scottish Government in early 2015.
Rest of UK students £9,000 per year, for a maximum of 3 years, even if you are studying a four year degree. See our scholarships for rest of UK applicants."
EU students £1,820 per year of study (for Sept 2014 entry). Fees for September 2015 will be confirmed by the Scottish Government in early 2015.
Overseas students (non-EU) £12,950 per year of study. See our scholarships for international applicants."

Scottish and EU students can apply to the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) to have tuition fees paid by the Scottish Government.

Rest of the UK students can apply for financial assistance, including a loan to cover the full cost of the tuition fees, from the Student Loan Company.

  • The main objective of finance professionals is the provision and dissemination of financial information for planning, control and decision-making purposes. Therefore, any student who is thinking of studying finance must be numerate and have excellent verbal and written communication skills as well as strong inter-personal skills.
  • An awareness of current affairs and the general subject area is essential. Potential finance students may find that reading broadsheet newspapers, such as the Financial Times, may help in this regard.
  • In their day-to-day working life, finance professionals face many challenges that require them to have good problem-solving skills. Applicants therefore need to be able to view and analyse problems from different perspectives, and think clearly as to how an overall solution can be achieved.
  • Evidence suggests that, as well as academic ability and excellent communication skills, employers expect potential employees to have integrity, motivation and enthusiasm. During your time at university you should be willing to involve yourself in non-academic activities that allow you to demonstrate these qualities.
  • If you wish to gain advanced entry into second year (and complete your honours degree in 3 years) you should have an HND in Accounting or Advanced Higher or A-Level passes in Accounting, Economics and Mathematics.
  • Your personal statement should explain why you are interested in studying finance. You should also tell us of any practical experience you have in the field e.g. acting as a club or society treasurer or taking part in a business enterprise activity at school. We also like to know of your ambitions beyond university and any career plans you may have already formed.
  • Your application should contain a prediction of the marks that you are likely to achieve for any exams that you are studying towards at the time of your application. An explanation of the subjects covered in non-UK qualifications gained is also useful.
  • Referees should indicate whether they feel an applicant's skills and personality are suited to their choice of course. It is also beneficial to know if an applicant engages in a wide range of extra-curricular activities and if they have been granted any positions of responsibility.
  • If you are unsure whether you satisfy the advanced entry requirements for the 3 year honours degree you should apply for this degree alone. Any application that does not meet the requirement for the 3 year programme but does satisfy the qualifications for the 4 year programme will automatically be considered for the latter.

Please apply via UCAS



DegreeUCAS CodeKIS Data
International FinanceN390