The details on this webpage are subject to change for Summer School 2023.

 

You will find further details of what modules are available as part of your summer school offer. Your offer may indicate 1 or more compulsory modules which you must complete as part of your condition. Please ensure you check your UCAS offer before selecting any modules. 

If you wish to select Advanced maths and/or physics, you must have attempted or completed the equivalent at higher.

Main degree programme

Suggested modules

(unless stated as compulsory in your UCAS offer)

Architecture & Urban Planning

No suggested modules

Art & Design

No suggested modules

Business, Management & Marketing and Economics

Globalisation

Education, Social Work and Community Learning & Development

Introductory Mathematics*, Global Citizenship & Health

Engineering

No suggested modules

English

English Literature

European Studies & Languages

No suggested modules

History

History

Law

Globalisation, Psychology, English Literature, History

Life Sciences Introduction to anatomy and physiology for healthcare professionals

Nursing

Introductory Mathematics*, Global Citizenship & Health, Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology for healthcare professionals

Philosophy

No suggested modules

Politics & International Relations

Globalisation

Psychology

Psychology

*Only eligible for those whose UCAS offer states this as a compulsory module.

**Only available to students who are applying for Life Sciences, CAHID or Medicine degrees.

Module Title

Academic Skills Online

Module Leader

Anne-Marie Greenhill 

 

Course Overview

This fully online module is designed for students who have not yet started degree-level study. It is delivered via the University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) My Dundee. The purpose is to prepare you for your studies during Summer School and to enable anyone planning to enter study at the University of Dundee to do so with a clearer understanding of the demands that university study will make on them. This 18-day online module is compulsory for all students engaged on Online Summer School, delivered in advance of your chosen subject modules.

 

Course Aims and Objectives

The module aims to provide you with the background necessary for you to be able to transition into your first experience of university with the required level of understanding, knowledge and practices required for undergraduate study. It further aims to help you identify your strengths and weaknesses and target areas for development before undertaking your chosen Summer School subject modules.

The module aims to introduce you to the skills and practices that are typical for university UG study, for example, the ability to:

  • develop and enhance academic and digital skills and practices;
  • think and act autonomously;
  • engage in online conversation with your peers and tutors;
  • organise your time effectively;
  • reflect on your learning experience;
  • work individually and collaboratively within an online learning environment;
  • analyse complex issues and;
  • express these in writing.

The objectives of the module are:

  • To foster a sense of belonging to the University of Dundee community;
  • To introduce and stress the importance of academic and digital skills and practices;
  • To provide opportunities for students to evidence their participation and engagement, reflectively;
  • To encourage student to develop skills, knowledge and understanding for HE studies;
  • To encourage student to interact with tutors and other students in a variety of ways in a non-threatening, online learning environment;
  • To consider ways to develop and utilise skills and practices;
  • To engage in constructive dialogue with teaching staff and peers;
  • To develop autonomy;
  • To develop understanding of competences required for their studies and;
  • To understand assessment criteria.

 

List of Topics

Part 1

  • Unit 1: University and You
  • Unit 2: Being Critical
  • Unit 3: Lectures and Listening

Part 2

  • Unit 4: Reading and Researching
  • Unit 5: Planning and Writing
  • Unit 6: Assessment and Feedback

 

Course Schedule

Online study begins immediately after the Induction Day and runs for 18 days.

 

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this module, you should have furthered your ability to:

  • study in an online environment
  • develop and enhance academic and digital skills and practices
  • think and act autonomously
  • engage in online conversation with your peers and tutors
  • organise your time effectively
  • reflect on your learning experience
  • work individually and collaboratively within an online learning environment
  • analyse complex issues
  • express these in writing and
  • work effectively as part of a group

 

Assessments

There is no exam for this module.

Assessment is continuous and consists of a series of reflective written exercises at the end of each unit and one summative online quiz at the end of the second week. Your evidence of engagement and participation with the module requirements will be demonstrated through these reflections and also your interactions with your peers and tutors during synchronous and asynchronous discussions.

The module is not graded, but you must evidence a level of engagement and participation expected of a student transitioning into undergraduate study in order to progress.

 

Resources/Materials

All required resources will be available to you through My Dundee and the Library & Learning Centre.

You will work through the module at your own pace and at a time that fits your schedule.

You will need a reliable internet connection, a suitable device and Microsoft Word. We advise you to work through the learning materials and activities on a PC or laptop rather than a tablet or mobile device. Although the module is accessible on these devices, the smaller screens mean that some of the content (such as interactive activities) will be difficult to read and engage with fully.

As you work through the module, you are advised to save and file your formative work electronically, or in hard copy, as some of the activities in subsequent units will require you to refer back to that work. This will also provide you with useful resources for your learning experiences in future studies.

Module Title

English Literature

 

Module Leader

Hope Roulstone

 

Course Overview

This course introduces you to lyric poems, shorter prose fictions, and drama/film, all of which will centre upon the theme of 'living in a networked world'. The chosen texts will focus on such aspects of our networked lives as personal relationships, life within the family, and living alongside people of different cultural backgrounds/beliefs/outlooks.

You will be encouraged to read the selected texts carefully in the light of those issues; and to begin to develop a sense of what each genre (poetry, prose, drama) can do that the others can't or don't do. The course will also reveal levels of aptitude for English studies at university level.

 

Course Aims and Objectives

1. Research Skills

You should emerge from this course with an enhanced awareness of the differences between the three main genres of poetry, prose and drama; and the distinctive ways in which poets, novelists, dramatists and film-makers engage with the issues facing us as we go about our often complex lives in a networked and world.

2. Critical thinking skills

Types of literary-critical thinking. The reading skills required for the appreciation of poetry are in some ways quite different from those required for assessing a story, and different again for the assessing of drama/film. In all cases, however, what is important is the level of attention you bring to significant detail. Across the three main genres, therefore, close reading will be encouraged at all times.

As a result, you should emerge from the course not only with an enhanced sense of the differences between the genres, but with a better idea of your own attention levels, and where these might be improved.

3. Group work

You will be required to work alone and as part of a group. Friendly and respectful discussion and debate are a key part of university life and are vital in helping you with your critical thinking skills. You will be encouraged to offer your opinion on texts and other course materials as well as participate in close analysis and close reading exercises in order to prepare you for weekly tests.

 

List of Topics

Personal relationships and poems (Week 1)

Gendered Ideology and shorter fiction (Week 2)

Social, political and gendered relations in drama (Week 3)

Communication, identity, and adaptation (Week 4)

 

Course Schedule

Personal relationships and poems (Week 1)

People instinctively reach for lyric poetry when they wish to express their deepest thoughts about personal relations. But what is a poem; and how do poems behave? How do poets manage to translate private experience into public verse?

Gendered Ideologies and shorter fiction (Week 2)

In week 2 we will analyse Charlotte Perkins Gilman's short story, 'The Yellow Wallpaper' which examines the position of women in Victorian Society.

Social, political and gendered relations in drama (Week 3)

Tennessee Williams' 'A Streetcar Named Desire' deals with fantasy vs reality, dependence, and gendered relations. Drama is among the most public of arts; and much can be learned about how such issues are perceived in general culture.

Communication, identity, and adaptation (Week 4)

Woody Allen's 'Blue Jasmine' is loosely based on Williams' play. We will explore the ways in which this adaptation has been modernised in order to speak to life in the 21st century.

 

Learning Outcomes

Students will emerge from the course with the ability to research and analyse different literary genres and forms. The will have enriched their interpretative and communication skills as well as their ability to work individually and as part of a group.

 

Assessments

There is no exam for this course, so assessment will be weekly and continuous. It will consist of written exercises done towards the close of each week, each of which will be worth 25% of your overall grade. Exercises will be returned graded at the first meeting after each exercise, or in the case of the final exercise, on request. These will become part of your course portfolio. The skills required for such exercises will have been rehearsed in discussion earlier in each week of the course. The same will hold true of the following three exercises in weeks two through four.

Close Reading (end of weeks 1, 2, and 3) = 25% each

Close Analysis (end of week 4) = 25%

 

Resources/Materials

For week one of the English module the poems will be distributed online ; 'The Yellow Wallpaper' and 'A Streetcar Named Desire' are available as E-Texts online. A film version of 'A Streetcar Named Desire' will be made accessible through Box of Broadcasts, as will Woody Allen's film 'Blue Jasmine'.

Module Title

Global Citizenship and Health

Module Leader

Kirsty Dalrymple

 

Course Overview

This module will explore the globalising processes that influence citizenship with particular attention to health and its wider context.

Course Aims and Objectives

This fascinating module seeks to increase your understanding of the links and synergies between health determinants for individuals and the wider global communities they live in. The learning will be participatory and transformative in its approach. Teaching will be delivered online using a blend of synchronous and asynchronous teaching. It will encourage reciprocal learning from students. This means that students will be encouraged to share their relevant insights and experiences throughout the module for the enrichment of the learning experience.

Objectives

  • Understanding what global citizenship means in its broadest terms
  • Exploring your attitude to being a global citizen in the 21st century
  • Key factors which influence global citizenship and global health
  • Salutogenesis and Asset-based approach to community health
  • Contemporary global perspectives

List of Topics

  • Globalisation
  • Global Citizenship
  • Global Communities
  • Health and Wellbeing
  • Health in a Digital Age

Course Schedule

Week 3
This week you will consider what being a global citizen means. How do you view your place in the world?

Week 4
This week you will consider the issues related to health from individual, national and global perspectives.

Week 5
This week you will examine the concept of wellbeing from a range of perspectives and how this relates to health.

Week 6
For the final week you will explore the impact of technology on health and wellbeing across the globe.

 

Learning Outcomes

  • For the student to explore the concept of global citizenship
  • Identify key factors which influence the wellbeing of the global citizen and their communities
  • Recognise assets on an individual, community and global level
  • Interpret current global issues in the media from a global citizenship perspective

 

Assessments

There are two means of assessment:

Weekly blogs(weeks 3,4,5) - This summative assessment element will be weighted at 30% of the total mark. Each week there is a requirement to post a blog for 10% of the total mark. (10 out of 100). The three weekly blogs will deliver 30% of the mark. (30 out of 100). The assessed elements of the blogs will be made available to the student at the commencement of module within the assessment folder.

Virtual Presentation at the end of week 5This summative assessment should enable the student to demonstrate their understanding of the module subject matter by selecting relevant module material to support a virtual PowerPoint presentation of a topic that is selected by the student. This will be weighted at 70% of the total module mark. Guidelines for indicative content in the presentation is detailed in the student guidance within the module assessment folder.

 

Resources/Materials

Ewles, L. and Simnett, I. (2017) Promoting Health: A Practical Guide. 7th Ed. London: Elsivier.

Hopkins, T. and Rippon, S. (2015). Head, hands and heart: asset-based approaches in health care. The Health Foundation: www.health.org.uk.

Illingworth, P. (2020). Global citizenship: an exploration of the relevance to UK health and social care professions. British Journal of Nursing, 29(4), pp. 242-244.

Naidoo, J. and Wills, J. (2016) Foundations for Health Promotion. 4th Ed. London: Elsevier. Nicholson, B., McKimm, J., & Allen, A. (2015). Global health (1st edition.). SAGE Publications Ltd.

Taylor, S. (2018) 'Global Health: meaning what?'. BMJ Global Health 3:e000843. The Health Foundation (2018) 'What makes us healthy'. London: The Health Foundation.

World Health Organization. (2020) WHO and Global Citizen announce: 'One World: Together at home' Global Special to support healthcare workers in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. Available at the World Health Organization website

Module Title

Globalisation

 

Module Leader

Dr Abdullah Yusuf

 

Course Overview

This course examines the concept of ‘globalisation’. What exactly is globalisation? What processes do we associate with it? Is it something to be welcomed or feared? What impact does it have upon states and societies? How does globalisation affect our ability to deal with the major social and political issues of the 21st century?

 

Course Aims and Objectives

This module aims to introduce students to the concept of ‘globalisation’ and to encourage them to think about how it is relevant to today’s big political issues. This module will encourage students not only to understand the events which are making headline news today; it will also forge a broader appreciation of how these issues have been affected by the forces which are commonly referred to as ‘globalisation’.

Various readings will be designated for each week’s study – these will be assigned at the beginning of the course. Aside from those readings recommended by their tutor, students will also be expected to conduct their own independent research and will be encouraged to source and analyse contemporary media and political analysis of each week’s topic. Students will thus not only develop a solid understanding of today’s major international issues; they will also develop key research skills.

 

List of Topics

  1. What is globalisation?
  2. Debates over globalisation:  a force for good or the curse of the poor?
  3. Empowering the people? Globalisation, politics & revolution: a case study. How events in Egypt (The Egyptian Revolution of 2011 – don’t get confused this with the counter-revolution of July 2013, led by the Egyptian army chief) have been influenced by globalisation.
  4. A new way of war? Dealing with international terrorism in the post-9/11 era

 

Course Schedule

Week1. What is globalisation?

Week 2. Debates over globalisation:  a force for good or the curse of the poor?

Week 3. Empowering the people? Globalisation, politics & revolution: a case study. How events in Egypt (The Egyptian Revolution of 2011 – don’t get confused this with the counter-revolution of July 2013, led by the Egyptian army chief) have been influenced by globalisation.

Week 4.  A new way of war? Dealing with international terrorism in the post-9/11 era

 

Learning Outcomes

Various readings will be designated for each week’s study – these will be assigned at the beginning of the course. Aside from those readings recommended by their tutor, students will also be expected to conduct their own independent research and will be encouraged to source and analyse contemporary media and political analysis of each week’s topic. Students will thus not only develop a solid understanding of today’s major international issues; they will also develop key research skills.

 

Assessments

Assessment will be by the completion of week-to-week tasks (first three weeks - 500 words essay) and by a 1000-1200-word essay to be submitted by week 4.

All assignments need to be properly referenced (I don't insist on any one style of referencing, but you must use the same style consistently throughout the essay. You can use either footnotes or Harvard- style system (author, year, date), not the both in the same essay). For more see the "Referencing examples - pretend essay” in My Dundee under "Course Information” folder.

One of the purposes of the weekly-assignment is to familiarise students with the skills necessary to discover and cite relevant source material on their own initiative. Citations from the existing reading from the handbook should be regarded as permissible, but you should bear in mind that to achieve the best possible mark, amongst other things, your lecturer will expect to see evidence that you can go beyond the reading list provided and discover and cite relevant sources yourself.

To upload your weekly essay/work in the Turnitin System, follow the links under the Assignments Section in My Dundee Module site (LD02010 Globalisation (SUM 19/20).

 

Resources/Materials

Key Readings:

Heywood, Andrew. Global Politics, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. ProQuest Ebook Central, https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/dundee/detail.action?docID=4763355

John Baylis, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (eds.), The Globalization of World Politics (8th edition, 2019).

‘Environment & Globalisation: Understanding the Linkages’:
http://faculty.cbu.ca/aburke/pols291/Environment_and_Globalization.pdf

Globalisation.  Key facts (The BBC): http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/guides/457000/457022/html/

Poverty in Africa: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/africa/05/africa_economy/html/poverty.stm

Wale Ghonim (a Google man), speaking about Egypt’s uprising: https://www.ted.com/talks/wael_ghonim_inside_the_egyptian_revolution

Clay Shirky: How social media can make history: https://www.ted.com/talks/clay_shirky_how_social_media_can_make_history?language=en

Kellner D. (2005) Globalization, Terrorism and Democracy: 9/11 and its Aftermath. In: Hayden P., el-Ojeili C. (eds) Confronting Globalization. International Political Economy Series. Palgrave Macmillan, London

Module Title

The British Atlantic Empire c 1500 - c 1783

Module Leader

Stuart Salmon

Course Overview

This history module will introduce students to the study of History. The main focus will be on the settlement and development of colonies in America by Britain, from the first attempts at colonisation in the 16th century to the American Revolution in the late 18th century. The module will focus on several key themes including exploration, migration, race, slavery and revolution. How Britain's experience fits in with the development of other European colonial empires and the involvement of Scots in America will also be explored.

Course Aims and Objectives

  • To provide an understanding of what History is, and how it is studied.
  • To introduce students to issues of historical methodology and debates.
  • To introduce students to various kinds of historical sources.
  • To provide students with an understanding of the key forces that shaped the development of Britain’s Atlantic empire.
  • To provide students with a grounding in the key transferable skills they will need at University.

List of Topics

Topics covered will include:

  • Thinking about sources and evidence
  • Europe and the Americas
  • The origins of British America
  • Settlement in America
  • Scotland and the Empire
  • Relations with Native Americans
  • Slavery
  • The American Revolution and its legacy

Course Schedule

Week one
An Introduction to History and the Module

Week two
Origins and Early Settlement

Week three
Life in the Empire

Week four
Race, Revolution & Legacy

Learning Outcomes

  • To introduce students to the study of History
  • To explore some of the key forces that shaped the development of England, Scotland and Britain’s involvement in the Americas
  • To introduce different approaches to the study of the past
  • To begin to introduce students to several important historical debates
  • To help students develop the ability to read effectively and critically
  • To introduce students to using a variety of sources
  • To help students develop the ability to think and argue logically and persuasively and to formulate and suggest solutions to historical problems
  • To help students to understand attitudes and ideas in the past different from our own

Assessments

1,500 Word Essay - 50% Overall
3 x Journal Entries of c 250 words - 35% Overall (Written in class)
10 Minute Oral Presentation - 15% Overall

Resources/Materials

Recommended reading –

Taylor, A., American Colonies: The Settling of North America (New York, 2001).

Module Leader


Andrea Mohan

 

Course Overview

This module introduces students to introductory level anatomy and physiology in preparation for undergraduate degree-level learning. The module will be delivered in-person and online with five hours of learning per week over four weeks (20 hours total). Teaching and learning will be in the form of:

  • live, in-person interactive teaching sessions in which students will be expected to do some small-group activities
  • narrated PowerPoint presentations covering the learning content
  • self-directed learning in which students will be expected to read recommended resources and complete activities such as posting on the discussion board
  • live, online recap and feedback sessions which focus on the week’s learning content
  • online activities will also be available, with some activities to facilitate learning. 

 

Students will have access to the module site on My Dundee. Live, online sessions will be held via Blackboard Collaborate on My Dundee.

Course Aims and Objectives

The aim of the module is to provide students with an introduction to Anatomy (study of the structure) and Physiology (study of the function), with a focus on three systems of the human body: the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system and the digestive system.

List of Topics

  •  Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology
  • Introduction to homeostasis
  • Introduction to the levels of organisation in the body and the systems of the human body
  • Exploration of three systems of the human body:
    • Cardiovascular system
    • Respiratory system
    • Digestive system

Course Schedule

Week 1: Introduction to module and module team, homeostasis and levels of organisation of the body
Week 2: Introduction to the Cardiovascular system
Week 3: Introduction to the Respiratory system
Week 4: Introduction to the Digestive system


Learning Outcomes

On completion of the module, students should be able to:

  • Describe the terms, anatomy, physiology, and homeostasis
  • Describe the levels of organisation of the human body
  • Describe and identify the main functions of the systems of the human body
  • Describe the structure and function of the Cardiovascular system, with a focus on the:
    • Heart
    • Blood vessels
    • Composition of blood
  • Describe the structure and function of the main anatomical structures associated with the Respiratory system
  • Describe the structure and function of the Digestive system



Assessments

There will be two formative online assessments and one summative online assessment for this module. The formative assessments will comprise of multiple-choice questions (MCQs) and take place during Weeks 2 and 3. The results from these formative assessments will not count towards the student’s final grade. The summative assessment in Week 4 counts towards the final module grade; this online assessment will comprise of MCQs.



Resources/Materials

The main textbook that will support the module is ‘Ross and Wilson anatomy and Physiology in Health and Illness’ (2018; 13th Edition) by Anne Waugh. This is available with full text online from the Library and Learning Centre.

For further reading, another recommended textbook is ‘Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology for Student Nurses’ (2011) by Ian Peate and Muralitharan Nair, also available with full text online from the Library and Learning Centre.

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Module Title

Introductory Mathematics

 

Module Leader

Dr Hiroko Kamei

 

Course Overview

The course will focus on statistics and probability, units of measurement and basic algebra. The course is held over a four-week period. Lecture Notes, Worksheets and Practice Assignments are made available, together with suggested time of completion. You are expected to read the notes and attempt to work through the problems. Help is available via email and via Teams. Solutions to the problem sheets will be made available so that you can check you understanding of each topic before moving on to the next topic.

 

Course Aims and Objectives

By completing this course, you will demonstrate your potential to work with a basic level of mathematics when encountered in other subjects, and you will gain knowledge, related understanding and the subject-specific skills that will help you use basic mathematics when required.

 

List of Topics

Section 1 – Statistics and Probability: Ways of displaying and summarizing data. Introduction to probability.

Section 2 - Units of measurement: Conversion between different metric units of measurement, conversion between metric and imperial units, relationship between linear units and areas and volumes.

Section 3 – Basic Algebra: Manipulating and simplifying algebraic expressions involving indices and brackets, Solving equations including quadratic equations and simultaneous equations.

 

Course Schedule

Section 1 – Statistics and Probability: week 1- week 2.

Section 2 - Units of measurement: week 2 - week 3.

Section 3 – Basic Algebra: week 3 - week 4

 

Learning Outcomes

Be able to present data graphically.

Be able to calculate summaries of data including measures of average and measures of spread.

Be able to convert between different units of measurement.

Be able to derive and use simple equations connecting different quantities.

Be able to simplify algebraic expressions.

Be able to solve simple algebraic equations.

 

Assessments

There will be four timed assignments. The first two assignments are worth 1/6 of the final grade each and the last two assignments are worth 1/3 of the final grade each.

 

Resources/Materials

None

Module Title

Introduction to Psychology

Module Leader

Anne Scrimgeour

Course Overview

This introductory course gives an overview of Psychology. The course introduces four approaches to the science of mind and behaviour; Cognitive, Biological, Developmental and Social Psychology.

Course Aims and Objectives

The overall aim is to provide students with an understanding of the topics Psychology covers, and the ways in which Psychological theories are developed through research.

List of Topics

Social Psychology

Psychology is the scientific study of behaviour and mental processes. Social Psychology seeks to understand how and why individuals behave, think and feel as they do in social situations. Social psychologists therefore apply experimental and investigative methods to examine the nature and causes of behaviour and thought in social situations. Topics include

      • Crowd Behaviour
      • Terror Management Theory
      • Obedience
      • Social Influence

Biological Psychology

The second section of the course introduces the biological networks which underlie human cognitive processes. You will be learning about the brain as a biological entity and its relationship to behaviour

      • The structure of the brain
      • Localisation of function
      • How the brain is studied
      • Abnormal development and injury to the brain

Developmental Psychology

The main aim of this element of the course is to give you a broader understanding of several of the main topics within the developmental field. We will introduce some of the research methods that are used in this particular field of Psychology and will highlight how different areas of Psychology complement one another, in particular Clinical, Health and Developmental Psychology. Attachment, Piaget, Infant Feeding and Maternal Wellbeing

Cognitive Psychology

This section will briefly cover some of the mental processes involved in Memory, Language, Perception and Attention and will provide an introduction to the methods used in Cognitive Psychology. By the end of this course you should have a basic understanding of some of the key theories and models that have been proposed to explain the processes relating to Memory, Language, Perception and Attention.

Course Schedule

Week 1. Social Psychology and online introductory workshop

Week 2. Biological Psychology and class experiment

Week 3. Developmental Psychology and online lecture

Week 4. Cognitive Psychology and online lecture

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course students should have a better understanding of Psychology as a scientific discipline. The course aims to provide a good knowledge and critical understanding of:

  • Psychology as a scientific discipline
  • A selection of research in Cognitive, Biological, and Social Psychology

Assessments

The course is based on continuous assessment:

  • 1 class workbook worth 80% in total (workbook based on class experiment in second week). Coursework will be submitted to Turnitin
  • 2 Multiple Choice Quizzes - each worth 10%

Resources/Materials

Each member of the teaching team will provide a reading list tailored to their specific course. As an initial point of reference students are advised to consult Holt, N and Bremner, A (2015) Psychology: The Science of Mind and Behaviour. Berks. McGraw-Hill Higher Education or earlier editions.