Twinning European and South Asian River Basins to enhance capacity and implement adaptive management approaches (BRAHMATWINN)

Twinning European and South Asian River Basins to enhance capacity and implement adaptive management approaches The EU-funded Framework 6 BRAHMATWINN project ran from 2006 to the end of 2009, involving partners from Europe and Asia and led by Prof. Wolfgang Fluegel of Friedrich Schiller University, Jena. It examined the potential impact of climate change on the hydrology of two major glacier-fed rivers, and the corresponding effects on communities living in the respective basins. The project focused on the Danube and Brahmaputra rivers, and particular sub-catchments were chosen in each basin: in the Danube, the Lech and the Salzach in Austria; and in the Brahmaputra, the Wang (Bhutan), along with part of the catchment in the Indian state of Assam and in Tibet.  The final summary proceedings of the project were released in April 2011.

Brahmatwinn was a highly interdisciplinary project that combined the downscaling of global and regional climate models to sub-catchment level, with the DANUBIA hydrological model, and to integrate detailed analysis of human vulnerability into these projections. Stakeholder priorities were incorporated through an elaborate cycle of delphi analyses and workshops, culminating in the application of the Mulino decision support tool. The work done by the IHP-HELP Centre involved the development of a highly detailed series of governance indicators relevant to both water and to the broader governance context, policy and planning assessment, and the development of assumptions regarding the nature of governance frameworks that might be expected for each of the IPCC SRES scenarios. Each basin state could then have its governance environment critically and quantitatively evaluated, and compared with the short and medium term governance characteristics that the SRES scenarios imply.