We support international researchers interested in conducting a research project in the UK. Applicants are invited to express their interest in working with our researchers, in order to increase the likelihood of a successful application.

The Marie Skłodowska-Curie (MSCA) Individual Fellowship can enhance your creative and innovative potential. It is highly flexible, pays a generous salary, and provides you with the opportunity to:

  • acquire and transfer new knowledge in your chosen field of research and innovation in Europe
  • expand your professional networks
  • benefit from the experience of working within a new geographical region of Europe
  • develop your chosen area of research by working with our professional and world-leading experts
  • enhance your skills and diversify your individual competences through advanced training

The fellowship offers 12-24 months full-time research funding covering:

  • living + mobility family allowance for fellows with spouses or dependent children
  • research, training and networking costs
  • management and indirect costs

The 2019 round of applications will open on 11 April 2019 and will close on 11 September 2019

Online application is now closed for 2018. 

Eligibility

There are two main eligibility requirements:

  1. You must have a PhD (or equivalent research experience).
  2. You must not have lived or worked in the UK for more than 12 months within the three years period, prior to the closing date of the application.

Choosing a research field

You have free choice of research field but your application will need to indicate how it fits with our strategic vision.

The University strategy underpins our core aim of transforming lives locally and globally. This strategy focusses on four interdisciplinary themes:

  • Understanding and improving health and wellbeing.
  • Life-enhancing creativity and design.
  • Innovating technological solutions to tomorrow’s problems.
  • Promoting social change to enhance diversity, justice, and socio-economic prosperity.

These themes are at the heart of everything we do at the University and are an important part of the research we take forward.

View the University of Dundee strategy

About the University of Dundee

  • We are number 1 in the UK at influencing innovation (Nature Index 2017 Innovation) and Scotland’s most innovative University (Reuters 2017). This means that we are doing the most to advance science, invent new technologies and help drive the global economy.
  • 76% of research at Dundee was rated ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally renowned’ in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework.
  • Our impressive research performance puts us number 1 in the UK for and number 7 on the global list of most effective publishers (Times Higher Education Young University Rankings 2017)
  • We have a long history of supporting a successful fellowships and currently have fellows working across a wide range of disciplines such as marine renewable energy, T-Cell activation and Water Policy.

Case studies

“The fellowship has strengthened my international academic research profile, enhanced the opportunity of further collaboration and reinforced my transition to full professional maturity.”

Emmanuel Akpabio

Dr Emmanuel Akpabio obtained his PhD in 2007 through the Commonwealth split-site doctoral Scholarship between Lancaster University, UK and the University of Uyo, Nigeria (2004-2006).During his doctoral scholarship, hewas interested in understanding the theoretical and practical aspects of how institutional arrangement shapes the implementation of integrated water resources management (IWRM) practices in Nigeria.This research opened up more interesting perspectives led to comparative studies of how individual and group experiences in developing countries are reproduced and propagated in developed countries.

Why did you apply for a Marie Curie Fellowship?

My interest in the Marie Curie fellowship on science-policy interface in the water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH) arose from past findings indicating a dangerously yawning gap between scientific facts and policies on WaSH in sub-Saharan Africa, leading to interest on how such gaps could be bridged in complex cultural settings. It is a very generous funding channel. I knew it would open a new chapter in my career allowing me to reinforce my networking capabilities, strengthen my competences in fieldwork, teamwork, inter-disciplinary and cross-sectoral collaboration.

What was/is your Marie Curie associated research project?

My project focuses on ‘Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Understanding Policy and Practice’ (WaSH-UPP), and is expected to explore the grand challenge of ‘water and sanitation for all’, recently codified in UNESCO’s Sustainable Development Goal 6 with particular focus on sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), exploring how formal and informal institutions intersect to shape policy practices.

Why did you choose the University of Dundee?

Dundee’s UNESCO Centre for Law, Policy and Science is the only Category II water centre in the UK and has an established track-record of translating research into policy. Dundee is the perfect space to prosecute this project.

What benefits have/will you gained as a result of the Marie Curie Fellowship?

The fellowship will allow me to develop specific competences and to improve my networking skills. It will open up new opportunities for teamwork, fieldwork, leadership and further collaboration to facilitate full career internationalization and professional development. Specifically, it will open new career paths in development research and advocacy science.

 

"Being a Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellow is a unique opportunity to explore my own ideas and pursue this challenging research supported by not one but two excellent supervisors and mentors."

Dr Aida Rodrigo Albors

Dr Aida Rodrigo Albors grew up in Spain, curious about animals, plants,and every living thing. She studied biology at the University of Valencia and became fascinated with axolotls and their unique regenerative ability. She completed her PhD in the world’s leading axolotl lab: Elly Tanaka, Center for Regenerative Therapies in Dresden (Germany). Her research focused on understanding how neural stem cells in axolotls(akaependymal cells) are mobilised upon injury to faithfully regenerate thespinal cord. This research then brought Aida to the lab of Kate Storey at the School of Life Sciences, in Dundee.

Why did you apply for a Marie Curie Fellowship? 

To support my research and multidisciplinary training. From the very beginning, it felt like a little victory: by asking the right questions, the application process made me think deeply, shape, and plan carefully my research project. Fortunately, being awarded the Fellowship is now making all the research/plans happen!

What was/is your Marie Curie associated research project?

I want to characterise in detail the identity, function, and potential of spinal cord ependymal cells – this time, in a non-regenerative species: the mouse. Because the messenger RNA inside a cell reflects the cell's identity and informs about its function, I'm using cutting-edge single-cell RNA-sequencing to perform a systematic analysis of the genes expressed in individual ependymal cells. A better understanding of ependymal cell biology may provide clues about why mice, like humans, are much worse than axolotls at resolving spinal cord injuries.

Why did you choose the University of Dundee?

The School of Life Sciences is equipped with top-class research facilities: including the flow cytometry and cell sorting facility, the advanced light microscopy facility, and high-performance computing. However, nobody carried out single-cell RNA-sequencing experiments in Dundee before so, to deliver the project successfully, we teamed up with computational biologist and expert in the single-cell biology field Chris Ponting (from the neighbouring Institute of Genetics & Molecular Medicine and the University of Edinburgh).

What benefits have/will you gained as a result of the Marie Curie Fellowship?

Being a Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellow is a unique opportunity to explore my own ideas and pursue this challenging research supported by not one but two excellent supervisors and mentors. It is also a unique opportunity to acquire and develop further the skills for my continuing development as an all-round independent researcher.

“The MSCA fellowship opportunity at The University of Dundee is very prestigious and offered me lots of opportunities (scientific, networking, soft skill development) which will now benefit me in future career opportunities.”

Dr Benjamin Cerfontaine

Before moving to Dundee, Dr Benjamin Cerfontaine obtained his PhD in Civil Engineering at the University of Liège in Belgium. His work was dedicated to the numerical modelling of sand behaviour while subjected to cyclic loading. He then completed a postdoc related to the numerical modelling of the cyclic behaviour of rock materials.

Why did you apply for a Marie Curie Fellowship? 

The Marie-Curie fellowship was particularly adapted to what I need in order to fulfil my career objectives. It gave me the opportunity to move abroad and allowed me to acquire new knowledge. It also ensured that my previous experience could be transferred to the host team.

What was/is your Marie Curie associated research project?

My project focuses on investigating the behaviour of a new type of offshore anchor for marine renewable energy devices (wind, waves, tides). The idea is that several floating devices might be linked to a single anchor to decrease the global cost of foundations. In turn the load applied at each anchor is increased and more complex (combination of vertical and horizontal loads, cyclic loading). I will study this behaviour through a combination of numerical simulations and experimental modelling in the centrifuge facilities of the Discipline of Civil Engineering in the School of Sciences & Engineering.

Why did you choose the University of Dundee?

The School of Science and Engineering at The University of Dundee offers several assets pertinent to my project: cutting-edge centrifuge testing facilities (less than 15 in Europe), a very dynamic team, previous experience/research on the topic.

What benefits have/will you gained as a result of the Marie Curie Fellowship?

The most valuable advantage of the MSCA fellowship is freedom. I have no short-term deadlines, I have funding to attend conferences or pay for experiments, I am free to take some time to focus on a more fundamental question, etc. In addition the salary was large enough to plan moving with my partner, even she had not found a job here before our arrival. So it is possible to reconcile family and professional life.

I only started 7 months ago but I can imagine this fellowship will help me in the longer term in my career in a number of ways.

"The MSCA fellowship at The University of Dundee provided the best way for me to gain an abroad experience in an excellent scientific centre and to complete the best possible training for my scientific career."

Dr Katarzyna Knop

Dr Katarzyna Knop obtained her PhD at Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan (Poland) where she discovered new elements of microRNA biogenesis regulation, resulting in co-first authorship of a research publication in Nucleic Acids Research journal. During her graduate career she project managed two grants, including the prestigious “Preludium” intended for the best pre-doctoral researchers to launch their scientific career. She was also successful in several fellowship applications, including ETIUDA where she spent six months at the Simpson Lab, developing her idea for the Marie Curie Fellowship project.

Why did you apply for a Marie Curie Fellowship?

It is one of the most prestigious fellowships in Europe and what makes it unique is that it aims to support the career development of each fellow. It offers a generous budget to fully develop young researcher scientific skills through training, developing transferable skills, writing publications and attending (and participating in) conferences. In my opinion, this fellowship is the best way for me to gain an abroad experience in an excellent scientific centre and to complete the best possible training for my scientific career.

What was/is your Marie Curie associated research project?

My project explores in detail the role of the m6A, the most abundant mRNA methylation in the cell, in tuning expression of important plant immune response genes. Using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model, together with state of the art approaches (like ChIP-Seq, iCLIP-Seq, Oxford Nanopore Direct RNA-Seq, WGBS, and MeRIP-Seq), I will characterize a newly discovered interplay between gene silencing, methylation and transcription termination.

Why did you choose the University of Dundee?

University of Dundee is an international environment of excellent scientists and is considered to be one of the most dynamic international centres for molecular cell biology. GRE, where I work on my Marie Curie project, bring together people with backgrounds in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, computer science, who work collaboratively in the field of gene function regulation. By working in open labs and organising weekly seminars (hosting worldwide known scientists and GRE members) and an annual symposium, GRE guarantees the free-flow of ideas and fluent transfer of knowledge and skills between researchers. In my opinion, GRE within the University of Dundee is the best place for my postdoctoral training and I am happy that thanks to Marie Curie fellowship I have an opportunity to work there.

What benefits have/will you gained as a result of the Marie Curie Fellowship?

I am convinced that the Marie Curie fellowship will be a valuable asset for my scientific career. It will allow me to develop further my knowledge and skills as a scientist and project manager. Also, it will expose me to new collaboration opportunities. Altogether, this fellowship will be a crucial step on my way to become mature, independent and highly-skilled scientist with my own research team, which is my long-term career goal.

"The University of Dundee has given me the opportunity to grow as a scientist – by allowing me to expand into a new area of research and to learn from the very best in my field."

Dr Julia Marchingo

Dr Julia Marchingo obtained her PhD from the University of Melbourne in 2015, from work in the laboratory of Professor Philip Hodgkin at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute on how the immune response is controlled to target disease. She used an innovative combination of biological experiments and mathematical modelling to uncover and predict how immune cells integrate a multitude of external signals to control our defence against infectious or cancerous threats. Julia moved to Dundee, Scotland in 2016 to undertake her Marie Curie Fellowship and is working as a postdoctoral scientist in the laboratory of Prof. Doreen Cantrell in the School of Life Sciences at the University of Dundee. 

Why did you apply for a Marie Curie Fellowship? 

I felt a fellowship would give me greater intellectual independence and security in my postdoctoral research position; also it is an excellent thing to have on your CV.  The Marie Curie fellowship offered a generous stipend as well as funding for travel, career development opportunities and some lab consumables. 

What was/is your Marie Curie associated research project?

My project uses cutting-edge quantitative proteomic technology to investigate how the PIM kinase family of proteins integrates with other protein signalling pathways to control the T cell immune response. 

Why did you choose the University of Dundee?

There were a lot of reasons. Mainly, it provided the opportunity to receive scientific training under the mentorship of a world-renowned expert in the field of T cell signalling whose work I greatly admired and more broadly the excellent quality of research and cutting-edge scientific technology available within the entire school of Life Sciences.  It also has such a nice vibe and I felt I could be part of the community here.

What benefits have/will you gained as a result of the Marie Curie Fellowship?

This fellowship has given me the luxury of time and (relative) independence to receive a broad training in a range of new technologies as well as to follow my research where it leads (even though that is not where we had originally expected!) Not only is the stable salary with additional funding for travel and career development great but it has also linked me in with an entire network of Marie Curie fellows and alumni. 

“The University of Dundee provides excellent support and facilities for my research, which is a perfect combination.“

Dr Barbara Mojsa-Kolodziejska

Dr Barbara Mojsa-Kolodziejska, completed an MSc in Biotechnology from the Jagiellonian University in Krakow in Poland before completing her PhD in biology of health at the University of Montpellier, where she worked under the supervision of Dr Solange Desagher at the IGMM. Barbara’s projects in France focused on the regulation of apoptosis by TRIM proteins, which may actas SUMO and ubiquitin E3 ligases.

Why did you apply for a Marie Curie Fellowship? 

The fellowship was actually recommended to me by Prof Hay, just after my PhD Viva. It proved to be a great idea, as I am now extremely happy to work under his guidance on a joint project that balances well my expertise and the know-how of the host lab.

What was/is your Marie Curie associated research project?

I am focusing on the impact of SUMOylation and its regulation on various cellular processes. I am also investigating the functional and structural characteristics of a potential SUMO E3 ligase.

Why did you choose the University of Dundee?

The University of Dundee provides excellent support and facilities for my research, which is a perfect combination.

What benefits have/will you gained as a result of the Marie Curie Fellowship?

This experience along with others has allowed me to gainhands-on experience in various laboratories around Europe, which has made it easier for me to understand the importance of collaboration and scientific exchange between countries.

“Applying to the University of Dundee for a Marie Curie Fellowship, has given me a unique opportunity to become part of the most prestigious European network, which is known to encourage and support the career development of young researchers.”

Dr Federico Tinarelli

After graduating in Pharmaceutical Biotechnology at the University of Perugia in 2011, Dr Federico Tinarelli gained his PhD in Neuroscience and Brain Technologies, at the Italian Institute of Technology (IIT) Italy which had a strong emphasis on epigenetics of circadian rhythms in vivoandin vitrousing primary cultures of neurons, glia and oligodendrocytes. In 2013 he moved to the University of Dundee and is currently investigating on cell cycle defects in developmental diseases as a postdoctoral researcher.

Why did you apply for a Marie Curie Fellowship?

I felt a fellowship would give me greater intellectual independence and security in my postdoctoral research position; also it is an excellent thing to have on your CV. The Marie Curie fellowship offered a generous stipend as well as funding for travel, career development opportunities and some lab consumables.

What was/is your Marie Curie associated research project?

I am currently combining embryonic cell cultures, advanced Flow Cytometry (FACS), microscopy and proteomic approaches to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the Meier-Gorlin developmental syndrome, which shows mutations in the DNA replication machinery.

Why did you choose the University of Dundee?

The School of Life Sciences (SLS) at the University of Dundee was the perfect institute to support my fellowship. SLS and its support facilities are internationally recognised in the field of DNA replication and chromatin biology. The School provided a unique opportunity to become part of the most prestigious European network, which is known to encourage and support the career development of young researchers.

What benefits have/will you gained as a result of the Marie Curie Fellowship?

During my Marie Curie fellowship, I will acquire and master a distinctive and diversified combination of skills. My work will help in the understanding of a broad spectrum of developmental diseases and it will contribute to shed light on molecular pathways of extreme relevance for new therapeutic approaches in cancer research. Therefore, the new and stimulating scientific discoveries that will emerge from this project will lead to important publications that will be essential for my futurecareer as an independent investigator.

“The host laboratory here in Dundee fits well with my research program. My supervisor Professor Angus Lamond is recognized as an international leader...”

Dr Harunori Yoshikawa

Dr Harunori Yoshikawa completed his PhD in Agriculture at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan in 2011, where heworked on ribosome biogenesis in human cells. He then worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the same laboratory in TUAT for 3 years. He joined the Lamond laboratory in Centre for Gene Regulation and Expression, School of Life Sciences in 2014 which was supported initially by Naito Foundation and Uehara Memorial Foundation in Japan.

Why did you apply for a Marie Curie Fellowship?

It gave me a unique and flexible opportunity to develop my own research project, to learn new techniques from the host laboratory and institute and to build new connections and collaborations. The Marie Curie Fellowship also provides me with a support for my family living together here in Dundee.

What was/is your Marie Curie associated research project?

My Marie Curie research project aims to:

  1. to develop a new method for fractionation of polysomes/ribosomes using uHPLC, an accessible alternative to the conventional sucrose density gradient method
  2. to elucidate the whole process of ribosome biogenesis using the developed method combined with proteomic approach
  3. to examine the role of identified proteins in both ribosome biogenesis and oncogenic transformation

Why did you choose the University of Dundee?

The host laboratory here in Dundee fits well with my research program.My supervisor Professor Angus Lamond is recognized as an international leader in the field of proteomics and nuclear structures includingnucleolus where ribosome biogenesis occurs in the nucleus.I discovered this whilst preparing my application for a Marie Curie Fellowship and the RIS team at the University of Dundee werevery supportive and helpful. Dundee is a good place to live, particularly with family. This is the first time we’ve lived outside Japan. It is a good sized city, with lots of nice places and nature nearby.

What benefits have/will you gained as a result of the Marie Curie Fellowship?

It has opened so many opportunities for me. In particular, a work placement secondment has allowed me to think outside of academia and also about how to make the most of my work withinacademia. I hope that the fellowship will help me establish my own research group in future. I think moving to another country is a massive benefit as we learn about cultural differences and the way to do research in another country etc... everything is interesting.

“A Marie Curie Fellowship is one of the strongest and most prestigious fellowships to start a research career as a postdoc in Europe. The School of Life Sciences of the University of Dundee offers a world-class environment to carry out research at the highest level.”

Dr Xavier Lucas

Dr Xavier Lucas studied chemistry in Spain before completing an MSc in Bioinformatics at the University Pompeu Fabra, Spain, and his MSc thesis in Poland. He then moved to the University of Freiburg to do his PhD in Structural Bioinformatics. There he worked with cheminformatics and structure-based methods for the modulation of protein–protein interactions. Xavier came to the University of Dundee to start a postdoc in the field of targeted protein degradation. After a year, he was awarded a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions Individual Fellowship.

Why did you apply for a Marie Curie Fellowship?

I applied for the Marie Curie Fellowship because it is one of the strongest and most prestigious fellowships to start a research career as a postdoc in Europe. Even though it is a highly competitive scheme, I really valued the degree of flexibility it ensures by providing some extra funding for research expenses.

What was/is your Marie Curie associated research project?

I apply computational chemistry and biology approaches to discover new binding sites in protein surfaces. These fit well in the bigger picture of targeted protein degradation, of which the Ciulli group are experts, because they can potentially be used to design small molecules that induce the controlled elimination of proteins of interest within a cell.

Why did you choose the University of Dundee?

The School of Life Sciences of the University of Dundee offers a world-class environment for carrying out research. In particular, it has attracted scientists who have created a strong hub for the study and modulation of the proteasome–ubiquitin system. The School attracts national and international funding and is helped by an expert team who tailor research proposals prior to submission. Help from this team and from my supervisor, Prof. Alessio Ciulli was instrumental to the success of my Marie Curie proposal.

What benefits have/will you gained as a result of the Marie Curie Fellowship?

It has given me the opportunity to carry out semi-independent research in the computational field whilst allowing me to benefit from being part of a mainly experimental lab. This has allowed me to challenge myself and develop skills out with my typical comfort zone. Additionally, my team have worked hard to integrate my computational skills with the experimental expertise within the group. I believe the knowledge I have gathered during my Marie Curie will be crucial to succeed in my future career.

Living and working in Dundee

Coined as the UK’s ‘coolest little city’ (GQ magazine), Dundee is friendly, compact, and bustling. With a population of 150,000 it isn’t overwhelmingly big however does have all of the culture and leisure activities you would expect from a larger city – and some would argue even more.

Learn more about Dundee 

Application

 

We offer a straight-forward pre-application process for this fellowship that aims to increase the potential of your final application:

 

  1. Download and complete* our Fellowship Pre-Application Form
  2. Email your completed form along with a copy of your CV to fellowships@dundee.ac.uk by 30th June 2019.
  3. Your application will then be assessed internally and you will be informed of the outcome.
  4. If successful, you will be invited to work alongside a supervisor to develop the full MSCA application.  All applicants will be supported by our dedicated European Proposal Development Team who will advise on how to maximise proposal potential.

 

 *please note that you are required to outline your proposed project, how it aligns to our strategy and who your preferred supervisor will be.