19 Aug 2016

Diabetes drug could help reduce cardiovascular disease.

The world’s most commonly used Type 2 diabetes drug, Metformin, may be ‘repurposed’ to treat non-diabetic conditions according to researchers from the University of Dundee. The international study led by Professor Chim Lang and Dr Graham Rena at the Division of Molecular and Clinical Medicine at Dundee suggests that there is now strong evidence that the drug exhibits an anti-inflammatory action which may prove significant in non-diabetic cardiovascular disease. Inflammation is understood to contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD) but existing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID...

Diabetes drug could help reduce cardiovascular disease.

15 Aug 2016

Is this the face of the notorious Lord Darnley?

A University of Dundee Masters student has stepped back through the mists of time to recreate the face of one of the most notorious figures from Scotland’s history, solving an ancient mystery in the process. Emma Price (23) has recreated the face of Henry Stuart, better known as Lord Darnley, as part of her MSc Forensic Art & Facial Identification course at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, part of the University. Her work will be one of the exhibits at this year’s Masters Show, which opens at Duncan of Jordanstone this weekend. Lord Darnley rose to infamy as the second husba...

Is this the face of the notorious Lord Darnley?

10 Aug 2016

Research supports targeting enzyme group to treat autoimmune diseases

New research from the University of Dundee has shown that targeting a specific group of enzymes could be a viable strategy for treating autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, which affect millions of people. Autoimmune diseases develop when the immune system, which defends the body against disease, is convinced that our healthy cells are foreign. As a result, the immune system then attacks the healthy cells. Researchers led by Dr Simon Arthur in the School of Life Sciences at Dundee examined the way that a drug called dimethylfumarate (DMF), which is licensed in the UK as Tecfidera, ...

Research supports targeting enzyme group to treat autoimmune diseases

10 Aug 2016

Dundee research explains drug resistance in ovarian cancer

Scientists at the University of Dundee have uncovered important information about how ovarian cancer becomes resistant to certain treatments. The researchers found that a gene called ABCB1, which is known to play a role in resistance to the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel in ovarian cancers, also causes resistance to other ovarian cancer treatments. Women with ovarian cancer are commonly treated with a combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel, but if their cancer stops responding, doctors need other options. For many women, particularly those with faults in their BRCA genes, a new family of drugs called PARP...

Dundee research explains drug resistance in ovarian cancer

2 Aug 2016

Appendix and tonsil removals lead to higher pregnancy rates, study shows

Women who have their appendix or tonsils removed when they are young are more likely to get pregnant, and do so sooner, than the rest of the population, a new study led by the University of Dundee has shown. The study examined the anonymised medical records of hundreds of thousands of women in the United Kingdom. Pregnancy rates were significantly higher among those who had had an appendectomy (54.4%), tonsillectomy (53.4%) or both (59.7%) than those in the rest of the population (43.7%). Time to pregnancy was also shortest among those who had both an appendectomy and tonsillectomy, followed by appendectom...

Appendix and tonsil removals lead to higher pregnancy rates, study shows