17 Feb 2017

‘Brutally murdered’ Pictish man brought back to life by CAHID team

Researchers from the University of Dundee’s Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) have reconstructed the face of a Pictish man they showed to have been brutally murdered 1,400 years ago. Archaeologists excavating a cave in the Black Isle, Ross-shire, were astonished to find the skeleton of a man buried in a recess of the cave. The body had been placed in an unusual cross-legged position, with large stones holding down his legs and arms. The bones were sent to CAHID’s world-renowned forensic anthropologist Professor Dame Sue Black, whose team – including Dr Christopher Rynn a...

‘Brutally murdered’ Pictish man brought back to life by CAHID team

9 Feb 2017

Support for health professionals reduces unnecessary antibiotic use in hospitals

A major international review led by the University of Dundee’s Professor Peter Davey has identified effective and safe ways to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in hospitals. The updated Cochrane Review published today concludes that guidelines and policies to pinpoint the patients in need of antibiotics have the greatest impact when doctors are supported to change their prescribing behaviour. Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial infections, such as pneumonia, but antibiotic resistance has become a major public health problem with some infections no longer treatable using currently available d...

Support for health professionals reduces unnecessary antibiotic use in hospitals

17 Jan 2017

Skin cancer model boost for prevention and treatment

Researchers at the University of Dundee have found that skin cancers in mice can closely mirror those found in humans, offering a model that could be used to help develop new drugs and find new ways of preventing the disease. Skin cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and is on the rise. In the 10-year period from 2001 to 2011, Scotland saw an increase of more than 50 per cent in the incidence of the disease with around 3,000 new cases now diagnosed annually. In many cases skin cancers can be removed but they are still a major cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in certain high-risk populatio...

Skin cancer model boost for prevention and treatment

5 Jan 2017

‘Molecular volume control’ may help combat tumours

A ‘molecular volume control’ may one day be used to manipulate enzyme activity in order to control the development and treatment of cancer, according to research at the Universities of Dundee and Bath. The researchers have uncovered new functions of an enzyme called Dual-specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5), which will help scientists to better understand how tumours develop. DUSP5 is known to switch off the activity of another enzyme, called ERK, which controls cell growth in a number of cancers, including colon, lung and melanoma. This would suggest that DUSP5 is a tumour suppressor, but studies...

‘Molecular volume control’ may help combat tumours

20 Dec 2016

Biomarker found for bronchiectasis chest infections

A study conducted by the University of Dundee has shown for the first time that a simple test can predict chest infections before they occur in patients with bronchiectasis, a common lung condition which affects people of all ages and leads to thousands of hospital admissions every year in the UK. Bronchiectasis is a long-term chronic condition where the airways of the lungs become abnormally widened, leading to a build-up of excess mucus that can make the lungs more vulnerable to infection. Patients can suffer from a persistent cough and breathlessness as well as persistent chest infections. The condition...

Biomarker found for bronchiectasis chest infections