22 May 2017

Awards recognise impact of skin disease research at Dundee

The international impact of dermatological research from the University of Dundee has been recognised by two major awards to Irene Leigh CBE, Professor of Cellular and Molecular Medicine. Professor Leigh has been awarded the British Society of Investigative Dermatology Medal, the highest honour in UK dermatological research. She has also been given the highest honour of the Society of Investigative Dermatology, the leading US research society at their recent meeting in Portland, Oregon. The awards recognise contributions to research in skin cancer, genetic disease and tissue engineering. Professor Lei...

Awards recognise impact of skin disease research at Dundee

12 May 2017

A mother’s touch may help to bond with unborn babies

Babies may be able to recognise their mother’s touch while still in the womb, helping them to bond even before birth, according to new research carried out at the University of Dundee. Researchers from the University’s Psychology department used 4D ultrasound videos to record the reaction of unborn children when different people touching their mother’s stomach during pregnancy. They found that babies were most likely to reach out and touch the wall of the uterus when their mother caressed her bump. The response was nowhere near as strong when strangers or even the child’s father rub...

A mother’s touch may help to bond with unborn babies

12 May 2017

Scientists unlock secret of chromosome copier

University of Dundee scientists have solved a mystery concerning one of the most fundamental processes in cell biology, in a new discovery that they hope may help to tackle cancer one day. The process by which cells copy their own chromosomes and then make new cells is vital to all of life. Chromosomes contain the genetic blueprint that makes us what we are and this information must be copied perfectly for new cells to survive and carry out their function. When the copying process goes wrong, it can lead to cancer as abnormal cells are created. Proteins in the cell combine to build a molecular ‘machi...

Scientists unlock secret of chromosome copier

10 May 2017

Dundee scientists help provide UK stem cell resource

One of the largest sets of high quality human induced pluripotent stem cell lines from healthy individuals has been produced by a consortium led by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and involving the researchers from the School of Life Sciences at Dundee.  Comprehensively annotated and available for independent research, the hundreds of stem cell lines are a powerful resource for scientists studying human development and disease, the authors report in the journal Nature. With collaborative partners from King’s College London, the European Bioinformatics Institute, the University of Dundee...

Dundee scientists help provide UK stem cell resource

10 May 2017

‘Protein missile’ raises possibility of disease breakthroughs

University of Dundee researchers have shown that it is possible to rapidly target and destroy specific proteins in cells, raising the possibility of developing new ways of targeting ‘undruggable’ proteins in diseases. Proteins, known as the building blocks of life, are vital to our existence and are found in every cell on Earth. They come in a huge variety of forms and perform a wide range of functions, including defending against diseases. In the vast majority of human diseases, amplification or genetic mutations alter the protein function in cells and this is what causes the damage that disea...

‘Protein missile’ raises possibility of disease breakthroughs