20 Nov 2018

School paper published in Japan Journal of Medicine

A paper written by Peter Davey, Evie Fioratou, Vicki Tully and Natalie Lafferty has been published in the Japan Journal of Medicine. The paper, titled Medical Education for Healthcare improvement, recommends service-learning, where students are embedded in an inter-professional learning cohort with both academic clinical mentoring. By making service-learning a “signature pedagogy” for acquiring the habits of an improver, the paper suggests that students and doctors in training could improve the delivery of healthcare services. Read the paper here: uod.ac.uk/081118 Want to know more? Here is som...

13 Nov 2018

Concussion study calls for mandatory head protection in rugby

Rugby players can almost halve the force transferred to their head during an impact by wearing protective headgear, a study by the School of Medicine has revealed. A team from the Institute of Motion Analysis & Research (IMAR) has called for the wearing of headguards to become mandatory at all levels of the game after finding that some mainstream products mitigated impact levels on the head by up to 47%. The findings, published by the BMJ, found that even the least effective device tested could make a significant difference in preventing head injuries, such as concussion. Professor Rami ...

12 Nov 2018

Portable microwave tech used in treating most common type of precancerous skin lesion

A new method of using a Scottish company’s portable microwave technology to treat sun-damaged skin conditions is being tested by researchers at the University of Dundee. It is estimated that 1 in 3 people over 60 years old in the UK has at least one actinic keratosis (AK) lesion - the first appearance of a potential non-melanoma skin cancer. There is a small associated risk that the lesions could progress into a more dangerous form of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. Patients who have actinic keratoses are also more at risk of all types of skin cancer compared to someone of the same a...

5 Oct 2018

School student earns recognition at national conference

A School of Medicine student has earned recognition for his research at a national conference. Aaron Tee was among the winners of the Emily Taylor Travel Fund award at the 27th Annual General Meeting of the Scottish Cardiac Society held in Peebles. The final-year medical student was awarded £200 for the best scientific oral presentation submitted by a medical student for his research project ‘Automated data capture from echocardiography reports to enhance heart failure population research’. The research project was led by Dr Douglas Elder, Dr Ify Mordi, Prof Chim Lang and the team at the ...