13 Dec 2018

Prestigious behavioural medicine role for Professor Annie Anderson

Annie Anderson, Professor of Public Health Nutrition at the University of Dundee, has been elected President of the UK Society for Behavioural Medicine (UKSBM). Professor Anderson officially took up the role at the UKSBM’s Annual Scientific Meeting in Birmingham on 12-13 December. The election reflects her position as one of the UK’s foremost authorities in behavioural medicine, an interdisciplinary field that draws together experts in psychology, social science, behavioural science, public health and medicine. The Society acts as a forum for presenting research on both public health polic...

28 Nov 2018

Funding award for School project to develop new male contraceptive

The quest of researchers at the University of Dundee to develop a new male contraceptive has been boosted with a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Researchers say the $900,000-plus award will enable significant progress to be made over the next two years in the discovery and development of the first safe and effective male contraceptive drug. The University of Dundee is uniquely positioned to pursue this project. It combines the internationally recognised expertise in male fertility research in the School of Medicine with world-class robotic high-throughput imaging facilities at...

22 Nov 2018

University welcomes Tay Cities Deal announcement

A £40 million investment in two University of Dundee projects from the UK and Scottish Governments will create jobs and attract further investment. Professor Sir Pete Downes, Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University, has welcomed the news that the Tay Cities Deal has agreed to support bids for the Growing Tayside Biomedical Cluster, as well as for JustTech, the world’s first institute for innovation in forensic science. The deal’s Heads of Terms Agreement, revealed on Thursday, announced support of £25 million for the biomedical cluster from the Scottish Government, and a fur...

21 Nov 2018

Antioxidants may prevent cognitive impairment in diabetes

Antioxidants could help to reduce the cognitive impairment that diabetes patients experience as a result of low blood sugar levels, according to new research carried out at the University of Dundee. Repeated episodes of low blood sugar leads to cognitive difficulty for patients with diabetes but the study, led by Dr Alison McNeilly from the University’s School of Medicine, suggests that stimulating antioxidant defences in mice reduces these impairments. This raises the possibility of one day being able to improve the quality of life of diabetics. Dr McNeilly will present her research at the Society f...