Explore our projects below to find out how we are addressing some of the key challenges in forensic science.

Future of Forensic DNA Analysis

We are addressing some of the main difficulties of DNA analysis in forensic science by finding new ways of analysing samples with multiple contributors. When samples are collected at a crime scene and sent for analysis, a complex mix of DNA sequences can be detected; for example if the sample was collected from a bag, multiple people may have touched the bag and the sample can contain DNA from all those individuals....

Future of Forensic DNA Analysis

Better Data in Forensic Science

Forensic science research data has been generated for decades, both in forensic science laboratories and by academic researchers, but much of the raw data is inaccessible or lost.  Traditionally within forensic science there has been little or no culture of sharing or preservation of research data and what data exists is spread across many sources with little organization, centralization or accessibility. Part of the vision of the Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science (LRCFS) is to provide the leadership, organization and funding needed to develop centralized data pools derived from existing data resources.  As far as possible, these data pools will be made openly accessible and freely available across the practitioner and researcher communities to the benefit of all who work in the...

Better Data in Forensic Science

Enhancing the detection of illicit drugs, explosives and bodily fluids

We are creating new ways for law enforcement and forensic scientists to detect illicit drugs, explosives and bodily fluids at the scene using simple tests.  ...

Enhancing the detection of illicit drugs, explosives and bodily fluids

Benchmarking complex DNA mixture analysis software

There are multiple analysis programs designed to make sense of complex DNA mixtures encountered as part of criminal investigations. We are attempting to find out the strengths and weaknesses of the different programs....

Benchmarking complex DNA mixture analysis software

Machine learning and feature extract of DNA profiles

Analysing DNA profiles from crime scenes is a manual process requiring input from a Forensic Investigator before it is put through analysis software to identify potential suspects. We are developing an artificial intelligence or ‘AI’ method to aid the processing of DNA profiles ensuring consistency and reducing variability....

Machine learning and feature extract of DNA profiles

The transfer and persistence of evidence

We are creating and testing methods to detect how materials are transferred from places to people, or from people to people and how long materials can last in the environment once they have transferred. Methods have developed collaboratively by scientists at the LRCFS and over 50 academics from multiple disciplines and the judiciary.  The resultant experimental design were refined in collaboration with academics from six UK institutions and prototyped in four of these institutions....

The transfer and persistence of evidence

Generating information about the background abundance of materials

We have worked with over 50 academics, forensic and other scientists, members of the judiciary, leaders from the Scottish Science Centres and a group of fantastic young people from Monifeith High School to design an initial series of citizen science projects to look at the background abundance of a range of different materials.   ...

Generating information about the background abundance of materials

Education and training in forensic science

We are creating a series of high quality, relevant training modules which will allow current forensic science professionals and students at all stages of education to access the most current, authoritative information associated with forensic science and scientific evidence in the courtroom. ...

Education and training in forensic science

Capturing, communicating and collaborating with Virtual Reality in forensic science

The project aims to look at different aspects of the visualisations of crime scenes. By understanding the current state of the art with regards to image capture, virtual reality and augmented reality, we are exploring how to translate these technologies into crime scene visualisation in an efficient and accurate way. Investigations into how people interact with visual and other digital information will form the basis of new tools which can develop effective communication and collaboration across the crime scene to court process....

Capturing, communicating and collaborating with Virtual Reality in forensic science

Augmented Reality Crime Scene Investigation

Rapid growth in the Virtual Reality (VR) in recent years has stemmed new research and hardware development for the use in Augmented and Mixed Reality. Used as a tool by investigators, examiners and remote specialist Augmented and Mixed reality have a wide range of potential uses to both aid examiners on site and facilitate collaborative efforts remotely. This project will focus on the practicalities, usability, technical challenges and admissibility associated with the use of AR and MR in Crime Scene Investigation and remote environments.  ...

Augmented Reality Crime Scene Investigation

Cognitive Bias

The research will take a psychology approach to investigate the effect of cognitive bias on decision making in both early career and expert practitioners....

Cognitive Bias

H-unique, In search of uniqueness - harnessing anatomical hand variation

H-unique is a five year, €2.5m programme of research that will be the first multimodal automated interrogation of visible hand anatomy, through analysis and interpretation of human variation via images. It is an interdisciplinary project, supported by anatomists, anthropologists, geneticists, bioinformaticians, image analysts and computer scientists.   ...

H-unique, In search of uniqueness - harnessing anatomical hand variation