10 May 2022

LRCFS Professor to Chair Independent Expert Group for the Scottish Government on Public Sector Data Use

 Professor Angela Daly from the Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science and Dundee Law School will be chairing the newly created Independent Expert Group for the Scottish Government on Unlocking the Value of Public Sector Data for Public Benefit in 2022.   The group was recently established and will use a citizen-led approach to develop framework of guidance to aid ethical decision making by data controllers. This is to ensure that the use of public sector data has the trust and confidence of the public.   The use of data can support better decision making in governance and...

1 Jul 2022

The Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science (LRCFS) has published a new research paper which has highlighted a lack of data availability in fibre research.

Fibres in forensic science have long been recognised as a trace evidence type in investigations.  They are analysed to determine what they are made of and can be compared with fibres recovered from other surfaces providing linkage information in criminal investigations. A new research paper from LRCFS has highlighted a lack of data availability in fibre research.  Link to research paper  Literature reviews and studies are essential to developing an understanding of a field of research and how it may be improved by identifying potential information gaps. The large volume of information availa...

8 Jul 2022

New PhD Opportunity at LRCFS

Don't miss this chance to complete your PhD at the #1 university for Forensic Science in the UK!The aim of this project is to develop highly sensitive, low-cost, rapid and non-destructive optical biosensors for the analysis of body fluids using advanced nanostructured materials. Detector technology capable of identifying traces of body fluids recovered at a crime scene plays an important role in several forensic investigations. Fluids such as saliva, semen or blood can be very valuable in identifying a suspect or victim, and they can assist in piecing together the circumstances surrounding an alleged ...

LRCFS Professor to Chair Independent Expert Group for the Scottish Government on Public Sector Data Use

 Professor Angela Daly from the Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science and Dundee Law School will be chairing the newly created Independent Expert Group for the Scottish Government on Unlocking the Value of Public Sector Data for Public Benefit in 2022.  

The group was recently established and will use a citizen-led approach to develop framework of guidance to aid ethical decision making by data controllers. This is to ensure that the use of public sector data has the trust and confidence of the public.  

The use of data can support better decision making in governance and policy.  

The members of the group include 

  • Angela Daly, University of Dundee (Chair) 

  • Annie Sorbie, University of Edinburgh 

  • Ruchir Shah, Open Government and Civil Society Activist 

  • Esperanza Miyake, University of Strathclyde 

  • James Stevenson, Duo Verre Partnership LLP 

  • Colin Birchenall, Digital Office, Scottish Local Government 

  • Charlie Mayor, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde 

  • MahletZimeta (‘Milly’), The Open Data Institute 

  • Carol Young, Deputy Director of the Coalition for Racial Equality and Rights 

  • Alexander Weir, Canon Medical Research Europe Ltd. 

  • Ronnie Kelly, Fujitsu UK 

Professor Daly joined the University of Dundee in 2021 and leads research in the regulation and governance of digital technologies. The research work with LRCFS explores the interaction between legal frameworks, the legal system and new digital technologies in areas such as evidence, crime investigations and human rights.  

The Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science (LRCFS) has published a new research paper which has highlighted a lack of data availability in fibre research.

Fibres in forensic science have long been recognised as a trace evidence type in investigations.  They are analysed to determine what they are made of and can be compared with fibres recovered from other surfaces providing linkage information in criminal investigations. A new research paper from LRCFS has highlighted a lack of data availability in fibre research. 

Link to research paper 

Literature reviews and studies are essential to developing an understanding of a field of research and how it may be improved by identifying potential information gaps. The large volume of information available within citation databases has become a challenge to manage and distil in all areas of research.

A scientometric approach was applied to fibres as an evidence type using information contained in two research databases, Scopus and Web of Science combined, to generate a more comprehensive list of references. A comparison was made with the references listed in the INTERPOL International Forensic Science Managers Symposium Science (IFSMS) reports (2004–2019).

By carrying out an analysis of keywords provided by references, this study has pointed out a difference between the vision of the IFSMS authors to report on the need to develop a database for fibres and other evidence types and the trends observed in the records indexed in citation databases.

This study has highlighted that data availability and location are generally omitted in publications that look at fibre evidence: the forensic science community has an opportunity to change this culture and lead the way in making their data available, aligning with the ideals of fairness, openness and transparency of the underpinning data upon which scientific developments are based.

Research paper

Galais, V, Fleming, H, Nic Daéid, N & Ménard, H 2022, 'Scientometric analysis of the forensic science literature for fibre as an evidence type: Access and data availability', Forensic Science International: Synergy, vol. 5, 100269. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fsisyn.2022.100269

New PhD Opportunity at LRCFS

Don't miss this chance to complete your PhD at the #1 university for Forensic Science in the UK!

The aim of this project is to develop highly sensitive, low-cost, rapid and non-destructive optical biosensors for the analysis of body fluids using advanced nanostructured materials.

Detector technology capable of identifying traces of body fluids recovered at a crime scene plays an important role in several forensic investigations. Fluids such as saliva, semen or blood can be very valuable in identifying a suspect or victim, and they can assist in piecing together the circumstances surrounding an alleged criminal event. The aim of the project is to develop highly sensitive, low-cost, rapid and non-destructive optical biosensors for the analysis of body fluids using advanced nanostructured materials. Optical biosensors using affinity-based systems with nanomaterials including plasmonic nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, quantum dots and carbon nanomaterials will be used to construct state-of-the-art colourimetric and fluorescent-based biosensors for body fluid identification.

We are looking for a research-driven, problem-solving and highly motivated student with an excellent degree in chemistry, materials science or chemical biology to join our interdisciplinary team working at the forefront of challenges in forensic science. The ability to think outside the box and come up with cutting-edge research ideas will be a unique advantage. 

The studentship is based at the Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science (LRCFS), University of Dundee and would involve collaboration with Dr Zhugen Yang at the Cranfield Water Science Institute, Cranfield University. Informal inquiries can be made to Dr Oluwasesan Adegoke () and Prof Niamh Nic Daéid ().

Funding Notes

Scottish/rest of the UK and Irish students are eligible for fully-funded studentships including fees and an annual stipend. International students as defined by the University fee status assessment (View Website) may be admitted to the programme but will be required to pay full overseas fees and costs if accepted

The deadline is 31 August.