Science and forensic science: The same, or different?

Join us for our Annual Lecture, an open talk about science and forensic science. Everyone is welcome. 

Because the raison d'être for law and science are polar opposites, fireworks are guaranteed when they meet in a court of law, as each half of this two headed hydra struggles for control of the relationship. 

Science is most notably conscripted into the law when an act of violence is perpetrated, for it is in this circumstance that physical evidence is typically present, stakes are high, and the law has a clear and strong motive for justice. Oddly for scientists, but rationally for lawyers, the law dictates which aspects of science are permitted in front of the fact-finder in such a case. This has broad and wide ranging consequences for the scientist in all aspects of the examination and reporting of results. 

Using casework examples, novel DNA analysis techniques, and current research at the Leverhulme Research Centre Forensic Science, this talk will illustrate the use of science in the context of legal disputes, examining the challenges that face science and scientists while assisting in the resolution of legal issues, all while attempting to ensure that science and forensic science differ as little as possible.

Keith Inman has over 40 years of experience performing forensic science casework, and is an Associate Professor at California State University in the US, teaching and researching a variety of forensic science issues. He is currently exploring the sources of variation in complex DNA samples at the Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science.

The talk will take place in the Medical Science Institute Small Lecture Theatre at the Unversity of Dundee on Wednesday 12 December at 12. 

FREE, no tickets required.

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