Explore our projects below to find out how we are addressing some of the key challenges in forensic science.

The Curse of the Burial Dagger - Virtual Game

The Curse of the Burial Dagger is an interactive graphic novel murder mystery, suitable for players aged 10+. Help Susie uncover different types of forensic evidence, solve puzzles and weigh up contrasting hypotheses. The game is suitable for families or school groups to play in groups and you can play it at any time. When everyone is a suspect, and a killer is on the loose, is anybody safe? A mansion near Dundee, 1923. Susie Sato finds herself investigating a murder when her great-uncle and host Lord Hamilton is found dead in his private museum, an ancient Egyptian burial dagger protruding from his back. Could it be the curse of the dagger, an object Lord Hamilton was warned not to remove from the tomb? Or could something else have caused his death?  ...

The Curse of the Burial Dagger - Virtual Game

Inside Forensic Science Podcast

Inside Forensic Science tells the story of a crime scene investigation through the eyes of forensic scientists. This first series focuses on a historical unsolved murder case from 1912 and asks forensic scientists ‘what would you do differently today?’ The podcast was commissioned by the Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science (LRCFS) at the University of Dundee. LRCFS works to disrupt conventional thinking, embrace new opportunities, and drive innovation that enables reliable science to be used in the delivery of justice. The series is narrated by Pennie Latin, the researcher was Heather Doran (Public Engagement Manager, LRCFS) consultant Pauline Mack (Digital Learning Technology Lead, LRCFS). Inside Forensic Science is an Adventurous Audio production. The podcast was funded by The...

Inside Forensic Science Podcast

Knuckle Down ID

Knuckle Down ID is part of a three year PhD project, assessing human variation in the knuckle creases on the back of the fingers and the impact of finger bending on their appearance in digital images. The images collected through this citizen science project will be used to develop a suitable AI algorithm to replicate the process of identifying perpetrators from digital images using knuckle creases.  ...

Knuckle Down ID

The Evidence Chamber

There’s been a murder. The police have a suspect but the evidence doesn’t paint a clear picture. In an online jury deliberation room, you watch the testimonies, scrutinise the evidence, discuss with your fellow jurors – and reach your verdict. The decision you make will change someone’s life: what verdict will you choose? If you’re a fan of crime fiction or true crime, this is the show for you. The Evidence Chamber is a collaboration between forensic scientists at the Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science and digital story studio Fast Familiar. Content Warning: The Evidence Chamber contains strong language and a reference to domestic violence.  ...

The Evidence Chamber

Sole Searching

We need your help to investigate how footwear marks are made. This activity will help us discover what marks are made by different shoes as people move in different ways. It's suitable to use as a classroom activity or try at home and we expect this activity to take around an hour (including discussion). This activity was part of the British Science Week 2019 pack of experiments for Secondary Schools!...

Sole Searching

H-unique, In search of uniqueness - harnessing anatomical hand variation

H-unique is a five year, €2.5m programme of research that will be the first multimodal automated interrogation of visible hand anatomy, through analysis and interpretation of human variation via images. It is an interdisciplinary project, supported by anatomists, anthropologists, geneticists, bioinformaticians, image analysts and computer scientists. ...

H-unique, In search of uniqueness - harnessing anatomical hand variation

Forensic Science in Schools

We are offering the opportunity for schools and pupils to get involved with leading forensic science research. The activities are suitable for secondary school age groups (S1-S6) and bring research to life in the classroom. All the activities are free and contribute to research in the area of Transfer and Persistence of evidence.  Our focus in the activities is on good scientific practice and the use of maths in the real world. The sessions involve visits from researchers from LRCFS and involve pupils working through a forensic science scenario, undertaking experiments that help us to better understand the environments in which we live. The sessions vary in length from 1 - 2hrs. Activities can also be run as a series over a number of weeks. ...

Forensic Science in Schools

Citizens' Jury

Our Citizens' Jury plays a major role in influencing and supporting the way in which forensic science research is planned, conducted and communicated. It is made up of representatives from members of the public from Dundee and the surrounding areas. The Citizens' Jury works in partnership with other members of the public, our researchers and some of our stakeholders (these include the judiciary, forensic scientists and the police) to help us plan our research and to aid in the communication of forensic science to the public. The recruitment for the Jury is now closed but we plan to reopen the opportunity to others each summer. A term on the Jury will last 12 - 18 months.  Further details about the Citizens' Jury can be found in the Citizens' Jury role description.  The position is volunt...

Citizens' Jury

DNA Methylation Analysis for Forensic Applications with Nanopore Sequencing

We are inviting participants (Staff and students at the University of Dundee) to take part in a new research project at the Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science.  The project will test whether biological age can be estimated through a DNA sample alone and, if so, how such information might be utilised in a forensic science context. The research is looking specifically at methylation sites on DNA. DNA methylation is part of the natural process which controls which genes are switched on or off.  As we age, the number of methylation groups on our DNA changes as the genes and the amount we use them changes. There is some evidence that some of this methylation is directly related to a person’s age. If you agree to participate in this project, we will need you to travel to the Univ...