Novel strategy for enhancing the performance of vaccines

Researchers at the University of Dundee have designed and synthesised a novel, multifunctional protease inhibitor that has the potential to significantly enhance the performance of vaccines through proteolytic modulation.

→ Novel strategy based on proteolytic modulation
→ Modulation obtained by a novel multifunctional protease inhibitor
→ Significantly enhances T cell response
→ Could be co-delivered with vaccine/adjuvant combinations

Background

Researchers at the University of Dundee have designed and synthesised a novel, multifunctional protease inhibitor that has the potential to significantly enhance the performance of vaccines through proteolytic modulation.

The Opportunity

A key requirement for vaccine efficacy is T lymphocyte activation. Protein-based vaccines are taken up by antigen presenting cells (APCs), broken down into peptides by proteases, and then displayed on MHC molecules on the surface of the APC. Researchers have now shown that too much proteolytic processing within APC can compromise antigen/vaccine presentation to T cells. Dundee researchers have used the novel strategy of suppressing proteolytic activity to significantly enhance T cell responses. Modulation of proteolysis is obtained by a novel multifunctional protease inhibitor termed Cystatin-Pepstatin Inhibitor (CPI).

The novel multifunctional endo/lysosomal protease inhibitor inhibits all three families of the endosomal proteases in an endosome-specific manner. This strategy has the potential to provide a novel, highly effective method of improving vaccine performance and work is ongoing to test CPI as an additive to vaccine adjuvants.

Commercial Opportunity

The University is seeking a commercial partner for this technology and contact is welcomed from organisations interested in developing, licensing or exploiting this opportunity.

Download PDF: Novel strategy for enhancing the performance of vaccines

IP Status: This technology is protected by patent (US 9050374) and three patent applications (EP 2744821, CN 103814046 and IN 1822DEN2014).

For futher information, please contact:

research@dundee.ac.uk