Nathalie Rosset

Research Assistant in History

Profile

Profile

I am currently Research Assistant for the project 'Scottish Towns and Urban Society in the Age of the Enlightenment, c.1745-1820', which began in 2007 - an AHRC-funded research project conducted in collaboration between the universities of Dundee and Oxford. In 2007, I completed an AHRC-funded PhD at the University of Dundee (begun at Strathclyde) on the subject of 'The "Physiological Turn" of Scottish Philosophy: the Scottish Enlightenment, the Body, and Popular Philosophy in the early Nineteenth Century'. In 2002, I gained an MPhil in Social History (with distinction) on the joint programme between the University of Strathclyde and the University of Glasgow. Prior to that in 1999, I obtained B.A. (Hons.) in Language and Foreign Civilisation with a specialisation in linguistics from the Université Lumière Lyon II. From 2003-4 I taught (as a graduate teaching assistant) on the Level 1 M.A. History course in European History at the University of Glasgow.

My own research interests are varied and include histories of the body, postmodernism, theories of Modernity, the Scottish Enlightenment and its nineteenth century reception, which is the focus of my current interests. I very much welcome ideas and discussion on any of these topics.

Publications

Publications

Negotiating the 'Physiological Turn': Re-Defining the Scottish Enlightenment, the Body, and Practical Philosophy in Scotland, 1820-1860 (VDM Verlag, 2008)

N. Rosset, 'Popular philosophy in early nineteenth century Scotland', Journal of Scottish Historical Studies, Vol. 27, no.2, 2007.

N. Rosset (with L.Paterson), 'The first flying Scotsman: James 'Balloon' Tytler and the Scottish Enlightenment',History Scotland, Vol. 7, no. 5, Sept/Oct 2007, pp. 34-39.

N. Rosset, 'The birth of the "African Glen": blackface minstrelsy between presentation and representation',Rethinking History, Vol. 9, no. 4, December 2005, pp. 415-428.

Book review: M. Pickering, 'Blackface Minstrelsy in Britain' (Ashgate 2008), Cultural and Social History, vol. 7, no. 1, 2010.