Sarah Gardiner

Fine Art BA (Hons)

Sarah Gardiner's work explores the ability of abstract art to create a universal language.

About

Art is a means of self-expression and can help an individual convey emotions which are difficult to verbalize. Research suggests that when given opportunities to explore and express who we are, we gain confidence that translates into success. The act of creating art allows us to think beyond boundaries and gain new perspectives. It is important that we start to treat art as a journey. It is a process and not a destination.

The purpose of my art is to channel my thoughts and emotions through abstract self-expression. My work does not attempt to represent an accurate depiction of a visual reality but instead balances the arrangement of elements such as line, shape, and colour to achieve its effect. 

I choose to create abstract, non-representational work because I find the creative process natural and spontaneous. A single line on a blank surface provides a starting point for the means to express myself. Conscious thinking is eliminated, and I am both lost and found in the pure freedom of creating. 

It is my responsibility as an artist to use my imagination to look beyond what we can physically see and translate intangible emotions onto a surface. It is then down to the audience to connect to my intentions and free their own mind of visual restrictions. What emerges on the surface is a visual language that is highly emotional and personal, yet at the same time universal.

A series of three painted canvases side by side with an array of red and black geometric lines that stretch from either side to collide in the middle. The red and black lines stand out boldly against a white background. Each painting is connected by the travelling lines and the three fit together like a puzzle.
This is a close up image of the first of the three paintings. Busy red and black lines sprout from the left hand side of the canvas and travel diagonally towards the top right corner and appear to leave the image. The lower half of the canvas sits empty.
This is a close up image of the second of the three paintings. This canvas appears quieter and calmer than the first with less lines. One large red line has continued from the first canvas, stretching across the middle of the painting and appearing to leave the image.
This is a close up image of the third of the three paintings. Busy red and black lines sprout from the right hand side of the canvas and travel diagonally towards the left hand side of the canvas. The red line from the first and second canvases finishes in the bottom left hand corner of this one and collides with the smaller lines sprouting from the right hand side of the image.

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