Activism in the Built Environment: Planning

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Accompanying the City is a Thinking Machine Exhibition in the Lamb Gallery is a programme of three evening events, the third of which takes place Wednesday 09 December 2015, 6pm in the D’Arcy Thompson Lecture Theatre, Tower Building, University of Dundee.

This double bill should be of interest to planners, architects, citizens and other agitators, everyone interested in the city region as a strategic planning unit, its past and its future, for the Tay Valley and Scotland.


CIATM-3‌Greg Lloyd: The demise of strategic planning (again and yet again)

Greg Lloyd is Emeritus Professor of Planning at Ulster University. He has researched and published widely on all aspects of planning, with a particular focus on national, strategic and city-regional planning. Drawing on some forty years in adademia, Greg will take the long-view of strategic planning in Scotland, tracing the evolution of Geddes’ city-regional thinking and imagining its future incarnation in light of the Scottish Government’s 2015 review of land use planning. 

Gordon Reid: TAYplan: City-regionalism in practice

A graduate from Town and Regional Planning at the University of Dundee, Gordon Reid is Team Leader for Development Plans & Regeneration at Dundee City Council. A seasoned practitioner, Gordon has direct experience of the evolution of city-regional planning policy and practice in the Tay Valley region. Reflecting on his experiences, Gordon will discuss how strategic planning has evolved and what can be learned from wider community and stakeholder engagement in regional planning.

The lectures will be followed by questions and answers from the audience.
Between lectures, there will be a wine reception in the Exhibition in the Lamb Gallery.

The event will be recorded and posted on the Geddes Institute website.
The event is free and everyone is welcome.
This event is sponsored by the Geddes Institute at the University of Dundee and the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland