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MA Degree Structure and Overview

What is the MA degree?

The four-year MA (Honours) degree at Dundee offers a range of subjects from business, the environment, humanities, and psychology which may be studied for either a single or joint Honours degree. It has been designed to maximise flexibility in course choices both for the specialist and the generalist.

Well-qualified applicants may gain advanced entry to Level 2 of the degree programme and achieve an Honours degree in just three years.

The degree pathways illustrated here demonstrate the range of subjects available. Although there are compulsory core modules in all degree programmes, there is a large range of modules to choose from at Levels 3 and 4 in all subject areas. It is also possible to study the more generalist MA Arts & Social Sciences (without Honours) in three years.

As well as the main degree subjects illustrated here, it is also possible to continue studying a European language (French, German or Spanish) throughout all years of your degree. Alongside these subject-based modules are also optional skill-based ones such as Career Planning, Communications and Information Technology and Academic Study Skills which help support you in your chosen field of study and career aspirations.

Programme Content

The MA possesses the flexibility of the traditional Scottish degree structure in which students take at least two main subjects in both Levels 1 and 2 (Level 2 only for the Advanced Entry Honours degrees) and do not have to finalise their choice of degree course until Level 3 when they are better able to appreciate both the nature of the subjects they are studying and the relationships between them. We strongly recommend that students remain on at least two pathways at least until the end of Level 2.

The academic year is organised into two semesters, each semester consists of eleven teaching weeks with an examination period at the end. Students take six modules in Levels 1 and 2, and four larger modules in the more specialised Levels 3 and 4.

MA Degree Pathways

 

Entry with Highers

LEVEL 1
Choose six modules, usually two from your main subject, two from any joint honours and the rest from across other MA subjects or from selected BSc subjects.

Entry with Advanced Highers
or A Levels

LEVEL 2
Choose six modules, again two from your main subject, two from any joint honours and the rest from across other MA subjects.

LEVEL 3
Specialise in your chosen subject(s) with a range of module choices to suit your particular interests

GRADUATE
MA Arts & Social Sciences (without Honours)

LEVEL 4
MA Honours - Usually a dissertation in an area of your chosing, plus modules chosen to reflect your interests in your chosen subject.

GRADUATE
MA (Honours)

 


Value Added

It is also possible to customise your degree even further with the following options:

General MA Modules

 

Level 1

The Globalising World: HU12001
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module highlights the connections between political, economic, social and cultural aspects of life in an increasingly "globalised" international environment and explores and evaluates the arguments surrounding the nature and extent of the process of globalization in the contemporary international system. The following key areas will be explored; the cold war world, decolonization, theories of post-colonialism and post-colonialism culture, power in the post-cold war world order, the processes of globalization, the united nations system, European integration, new security challenges and the emerging world economic order.

Read more about HU12001

 

Level 2

America: Land of the free? - AM22003
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module explores American society, politics and culture by drawing upon the theme of 'freedom'. It examines how the meaning of freedom has been challenged and shaped by different groups and events over the course of American history, and how it has helped to shape American identity into the twenty-first century. The idea of freedom is fundamental to the identity of the American nation, and a central term in American political vocabulary. Eric Foner has described the history of freedom in America as "a tale of debates and disagreements and conflicts and controversies...the meaning of freedom has been fought out, battled over, at every level of society".

Read more about AM22003

Economic Studies Modules

 

Level 1

Global Economic Perspectives: EC11002
Semester 1, 20 credits
Why does half the world's population live on less than $2 a day and can we do anything about world poverty? Is Climate change inevitable and if not how can we use economics to find a solution? In this module we show how elementary economics is used to get answers to contemporary and historical economic questions. No previous exposure to economic analysis is assumed.

Foundations of Economic Analysis: EC12003
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module develops the tools for analysing modern economy. It demonstrates how these tools can be used to analyse the behaviour of firms and households in the market place. It also analyses cases where markets break down and how government might intervene to prevent monopolies, pollution and exploitation, while promoting social welfare. In addition to this, the module also looks at the economy as a whole.

 

Level 2

Microeconomics: EC21001
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module covers the micro aspects of the economy by focusing, initially, on the basic theories of consumer and firm behaviour. These provide the basis for the derivation and analysis of market demand and supply in various settings. The module then examines these settings by looking more closely at the market structure, and attempts to highlight: i) the conditions under which markets will or will not produce desirable outcomes; and ii) the role of government in improving the operation of markets.

Macroeconomics & Economic Statistics: EC22002
Semester 2, 20 credits
In the macroeconomics part of this module we provide an overview of the functioning of the macro-economy in a global context and an understanding of the key policy issues of the United Kingdom in particular. The module goes on to consider how and why money markets are important in the real world. The module also provides a short section on statistics where we introduce you to a selection of statistical procedures commonly used in economics and business and discuss the nature and limitations of some of the indicators conventionally used to measure economic performance.

Economic Studies degree information

English/English and Film Studies Modules

 

Level 1

Introduction to Literary Study: EN11001
Semester 1, 20 credits
What makes a novel a novel? What is distinctive about poetry? How do you analyse a play in performance? The course explores a diverse range of drama, fiction and poetry in order to suggest answers to these questions.

Read more about EN11001

Early Modern to Early Romantic Literature, 1564 - 1789: EN11006
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module surveys the development of English Literature from the Early Modern period to the end of the Eighteenth century in relation to the ideas of the Enlightenment and the emergence of modern culture, with its concerns about identity, gender, religion, and power. This module will explore Early Modern drama, including texts by William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlow, John Webster; metaphysical poetry including work by John Donne, Andrew Marvel, John Milton and the rise of the novel form, including work by Daniel Defoe or Samuel Richardson.

Read more about EN11006

Reading the Screen: An Introduction to Film Studies: EN11003
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module will focus on how films are created, concentrating on topics such as mise en scene, editing, auteur theory, genre and the styles of key Directors.

Read more about EN11003

Perspectives and Movements in Cinema: EN12005
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module builds on Reading the Screen by focusing on examples from a number of distinct movements in the history of the cinema, such as Italian Neo-realism, the French New Wave, Japanese cinema of the 1950s, and British Cinema of the 1940s.

Read more about EN12005

 

Level 2

Romantic to Victorian Literature, 1789 - 1901: EN22002
Semester 1, 20 credits
The module explores Romantic and Victorian Literature paying particular attention to the way fiction, poetry and drama develops out of earlier traditions and tendencies and how they break from earlier movements. The work of the Romantic poets is read along with a series of nineteenth-century texts which link closely with the themes and moods of the poetry. Some of these texts will bring out the powerful strand of Gothic Romanticism which is the counterweight to the social realism of the Victorian novel. Poets such as John Keats, Samuel Coleridge, William Wordsworth, Lord Byron, Percy Shelley and Alfred Tennyson, novelists such as Emily Bronte, Charles Dickens, Bram Stoker, Robert Louis Stevenson and playwrights such as Oscar Wilde will be included.
Find out more about EN22002

Introduction to Creative Writing Practice: EN21005
Semester 1, 20 credits
Think of yourself as a writer? Either one who hasn’t necessarily written anything much so far but who has something to say? Or one who has already put together some poems or pieces of prose but isn’t sure how to take that work further? Or do you wish to improve the standard of your non-fiction work? Whatever kind of writing you are interested in producing, this introductory module, taught in a combination of intensive workshops and down-the-line tutorials, will make you more aware of the quality of the work you produce, helping you improve and refine it and build up a portfolio of writing by the end of the semester that you can be proud of.
Find out more about EN21005

Modernist to Contemporary Literature, 1901 - Present Day: EN21004
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module examines 20th and 21st century writing, paying particular attention to the way fiction, poetry and drama develops out of earlier traditions and tendencies and how they break from earlier movements. It examines how the forces of modernity - industrialisation, urbanisation, technological changes, war, empire, migration challenges previous ways of structuring and making sense of the world through a range of 20th and 21st century texts.
Find out more about EN21004

Classic Hollywood Cinema - An Excessively Obvious Cinema: EN21003
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module examines the Golden Age of Hollywood from 1930-1960 looking at the role of the studio system alongside social, political and historical concerns across a range of genres. From screwball comedy and the western to crime, war films and science-fiction, this module will explore this rich and lively period of film-making in its creation of an apparently seamless, unambiguous cinematic narrative (the Hollywood style). Some of the very best films which have ever emerged from Hollywood are studied here.
Find out more about EN21003

Film Noir: The Dark Side of the Street: EN22004
Semester 2, 20 credits
The phrase “Film Noir” conjures up images of moody crime thrillers shrouded in shadow, with gun-toting femme fatales, vicious hoodlums and hapless private detectives, but as it will show, Noir is much more complicated than that, representing a counter tradition within Hollywood and reflecting the cultural climate of repression and paranoia engendered by wartime and cold war policies. This module will analyse the distinct visual style and aesthetics of Film Noirs of the classic period (1941-1958), and Neo-Noirs in the decades that followed. Of central importance will be the influence of emigre filmmakers, who bought with them the influence of German Expressionism and French Poetic Realism when fleeing Nazi tyranny.
Find out more about EN22004

English degree information

Environmental Science Modules

 

Level 1

The Physical Environment: EV11001
Semester 1, 20 credits
The foundation of environments in all parts of the globe is a physical one, determined by geological and terrestrial processes, and flows of water and energy. These processes provide the habitat in which all species live and evolve, and provide the baseline against which change resulting from human agency can be measured. As the pace of human change accelerates in all parts of the world, an appreciation of how these influences control the nature and evolution of environments is increasingly valuable.

Environments for Life: EV12002
Semester 2, 20 credits
Earth as a planet is experiencing change which, in many respects, is unprecedented on a geological timescale. Many of these changes are truly global in scale and have diverse impacts on living systems. Global warming, ozone layer destruction, the pollution of air and water and loss of species due to land and marine management policies are just some of the issues causing worldwide concern. Managing all these issues requires a knowledge of the scientific principles and processes that maintain a sustainable environment.

The Environments for Life module aims to provide this basic understanding in a range of accessible formats, through a programme of lectures, tutorials and practical classes focussing on environmental chemistry, atmospheric processes, weather and climate, terrestrial ecosystems, biodiversity, aquatic science and urban green space management.

 

Level 2

Management and Monitoring: EV21001
Semester 1, 20 credits
Environmental resource management is described as an essential process of decision making incorporating the setting of environmental objectives, monitoring and assessment of current environmental conditions and the prediction of future change. Students will study resource management issues in relation to Mineral Resources and in a wider context, the protection of Scotland's natural resource base as a whole. The design of environmental monitoring programmes is considered in terms of supplying information required for management. In particular, the use of Remote Sensing techniques is examined in this module.

Mechanisms and Measurements: EV22002
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module serves as an introduction to the science of aquatic, atmospheric and terrestrial processes and emphasizes physical, chemical and biological mechanisms and their measurement. The range of topics taught in the module gives students their first opportunity to study oceanography, incorporating ocean circulation and global heat transfer and leading in to the productivity of the marine environment. Of equal importance are terrestrial processes. Terrestrial ecology is studied through exploration of vegetation adaptation, land reclamation and restoration. Finally, the chemistry of atmospheric pollution, water pollution and water treatment are examined.

Environmental Science degree information

Environmental Sustainability Modules

 

Level 1

Sustainable Development and the Environment: TP11003
Semester 1, 20 credits
The need for a more responsible approach to resource use is established and the achievement of sustainable development is considered at the international, national and local scale. This module explores the relationship between the concept of sustainable development and the application of policies designed to deliver sustainable outcomes. It considers the interface between sustainability and economic growth, and how this has been interpreted through policy initiatives at international, European, national and local level. Of particular interest is the way in which sustainability is being applied and implemented within the UK.

Countryside Planning and Management: TP12004
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module introduces students to the principal institutions concerned with the environment. It explores the practice of planning and development in the countryside and examines some of the major issues and concerns that have a bearing on planning and environmental management processes, such as affordable housing provision, wind farm developments and community land ownership.

The Physical Environment: EV11001
Semester 1, 20 credits
The foundation of environments in all parts of the globe is a physical one, determined by geological and terrestrial processes, and flows of water and energy. These processes provide the habitat in which all species live and evolve, and provide the baseline against which change resulting from human agency can be measured. As the pace of human change accelerates in all parts of the world, an appreciation of how these influences control the nature and evolution of environments is increasingly valuable.

Environments for Life: EV12002
Semester 2, 20 credits
Earth as a planet is experiencing change which, in many respects, is unprecedented on a geological timescale. Many of these changes are truly global in scale and have diverse impacts on living systems. Global warming, ozone layer destruction, the pollution of air and water and loss of species due to land and marine management policies are just some of the issues causing worldwide concern. Managing all these issues requires a knowledge of the scientific principles and processes that maintain a sustainable environment.

The Environments for Life module aims to provide this basic understanding in a range of accessible formats, through a programme of lectures, tutorials and practical classes focussing on environmental chemistry, atmospheric processes, weather and climate, terrestrial ecosystems, biodiversity, aquatic science and urban green space management.

 

Level 2

Management in the Built and Natural Environments: TP21009
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module examines management for environmental (built and natural) professionals and environmental projects.

Introduction to Environmental Law: TP22004
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module introduces students to statutory controls in relation to the environment, and considers the relationship between planning law and environmental regulation.

Management and Monitoring: EV21001
Semester 1, 20 credits
Environmental resource management is described as an essential process of decision making incorporating the setting of environmental objectives, monitoring and assessment of current environmental conditions and the prediction of future change. Students will study resource management issues in relation to Mineral Resources and in a wider context, the protection of Scotland's natural resource base as a whole. The design of environmental monitoring programmes is considered in terms of supplying information required for management. In particular, the use of Remote Sensing techniques is examined in this module.

Mechanisms and Measurements: EV22002
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module serves as an introduction to the science of aquatic, atmospheric and terrestrial processes and emphasizes physical, chemical and biological mechanisms and their measurement. The range of topics taught in the module gives students their first opportunity to study oceanography, incorporating ocean circulation and global heat transfer and leading in to the productivity of the marine environment. Of equal importance are terrestrial processes. Terrestrial ecology is studied through exploration of vegetation adaptation, land reclamation and restoration. Finally, the chemistry of atmospheric pollution, water pollution and water treatment are examined.

Environmental Sustainability degree information

European Studies Modules

 

Level 1

The Globalising World: HU12001
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module highlights the connections between political, economic, social and cultural aspects of life in an increasingly "globalised" international environment and explores and evaluates the arguments surrounding the nature and extent of the process of globalization in the contemporary international system. The following key areas will be explored; the cold war world, decolonization, theories of post-colonialism and post-colonialism culture, power in the post-cold war world order, the processes of globalization, the united nations system, European integration, new security challenges and the emerging world economic order.

Read more about HU12001

 

Level 2

Contemporary Challenges for Europe: EU21002
Semester 1, 20 credits
The European Union faces many challenges including constitutional issues, the management of the single currency, the consequences of enlargement and the questions of national identity posed by migration. This module draws on ideas from geography, history, economics and politics to offer a unique perspective on important contemporary issues affecting the future of Europe.

Read more about EU21002

European Studies degree information

Geography Modules

 

Level 1

A World in Crisis? Population and Environment: GE11001
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module opens up some major areas in Geography to students from a wide range of educational backgrounds. It is about the perceived crises associated with a rapid increase in the global population and its co-incidence with processes resulting in global, regional and local damage to the physical environment. Specific themes explored in the module include: causes of human population increase; connection between migration and urbanization; relation between population and development as well as environment; and, air and water pollution; natural and human-induced disasters; loss of bio-diversity; and impacts of environmental problems on the economies of less developed and developed countries. The module comprises a series of lectures, tutorials and workshops.

A World of Plenty? Environment and Development: GE12002
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module examines the nature of environmental resources and considers how access to resources has shaped the world economy into its present state of geographically unequal development at a local, urban-regional and international scales. The module comprises a large range of exciting topics including appreciation of renewable and non-renewable resources, principles of sustainable development, the impacts of globalisation on both developed and less developed countries and processes of global urban development and the emergence of world cities. The module comprises a series of lectures, fieldwork (in the form of student-led ‘city walks’), and workshops/seminars examining the physical setting, development history and sustainable future of the City of Dundee.

 

Level 2

Dynamic Human Worlds: GE21001
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module examines how space and place interact with social, cultural and economic processes. For example, it considers how different social groups define themselves geographically in terms of racial and class segregation, gated communities and 'gang-land' territories; and it looks at how firms decide where to locate and why some parts of the world are more affluent than others.

Dynamic Physical Worlds: GE22002
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module covers key concepts used in geomorphology and hydrology, focusing on rivers, slopes and glaciers and the processes acting to create different landscapes. It also includes a residential field trip to the Scottish Highlands.

Geography degree information

History Modules

 

Level 1

The Rise of Atlantic Empires, 1500-1750: HY11005
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module will provide a comparative understanding of the development of European Empires in Africa and the Americas between 1500-1750. It will also examine the origins of modern "globalisation" and improve students' abilities to read original sources (in English translation) and use them towards constructive argument. You will have an understanding of the major forces that shaped the expansion of Europe from the 15th to the 18th centuries and an appreciation of the comparative development of British, French, Spanish and Dutch empires.

Read more about HY11005

Age of Revolution c.1750 to 1850: HY11004
Semester 2, 20 credits
What do we mean by the term 'revolution' and are there differing definitions of what is meant by revolution when applied to events taking place across Europe and North America during the period 1750 to 1850? This module aims to address such questions by examining the political and social impact of revolution in America and France, the causes and consequences of Industrial Revolution in Britain, the revolution in ideas during the Enlightenment, over the period 1750 and 1850, and debates and interpretations about this 'age of revolution'. This module will also promote an awareness of a range of different approaches and sources which are available for the study of the past through a broad comparative survey of different peoples and different states.

Find out more about HY11004

 

Level 2

The Great War and History: Debates and Perspectives: HY21003
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module uses the First World War as a case study of different approaches to the study of History. Its main aims are (1) to provide a critical perspective on how different historical schools have approached the conflict from 1918 to the present, (2) to explore how and why national cultures understand the war differently from one another, (3) to examine global and transnational perspectives on the war, and (4) to reflect critically on key debates about the conflict in light of the above aims. Specific themes include: the development of Great War historiography since 1918; global and colonial contexts of the war; the economic, political, and cultural impacts; the frontline experience; the civilian experience; gender and medical histories of the conflict; bereavement and mourning; public histories, including official commemoration and popular media portrayals; local histories of the Great War; legacies.

Find out more about HY21003

Europe in Transition, 1870-1922: HY22004
Semester 2, 20 credits
How did Europe become 'modern'? Globalisation started already in the 19th century with the transition from slow moving agricultural societies to modern, fast-moving, inter-connected, industrial societies with mass-politics and mass-culture, extending from Europe across the globe. This module provides you with a survey of the major aspects of political, economic, social and cultural developments in Europe from 1870 to 1922. This was an age of rapid transition from pre-democratic, agricultural village society to urban mass-society, globalising economic structures, rising prosperity and political democratisation.

Find out more about HY22004

History degree information

Languages

 

Level 1

Practical French/German/Spanish Intensive 1A: PF11001/PG11001/PS11001
Semester 1, 20 credits

  • Basic grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation
  • Informal letter writing; speaking about oneself and others; asking for information, answering questions, expressing an opinion

Topic areas include family life, education, employment, leisure.

Read more about PF11001, PG11001 and PS11001

Practical French/German/Spanish 1A: PF11003/PG11003/PS11003
Semester 1, 20 credits

  • Reading comprehension, dictionary skills, and précis skills, CV and formal e-mail re employment
  • Giving your opinion, expressing preferences, oral presentation skills; telephone skills; job interview skills

Topic areas include education and student life, employment, geography and regional differences.

Read more about PF11003, PG11003 and PS11003

Practical French/German/Spanish Intensive 1B: PF12002/PG12002/PS12002
Semester 2, 20 credits

  • Reading comprehension; dictionary skills; summary skills
  • Listening, finding out, and giving instructions; oral presentation; basic telephone skills

Topic areas include health, travel and transport, regional differences, historical personalities and events.

Read more about PF12002, PG12002 and PS12002

Practical French/German/Spanish 1B: PF12004/PG12004/PS12004
Semester 2, 20 credits

  • Listening comprehension, note taking, summary skills and individual written project
  • Investigative and interviewing skills, skills of oral presentation and persuasion

Topic areas include environment and tourism, media and publicity, historical events and political structures.

Read more about PF12004, PG12004 and PS12004

 

Level 2

Practical French/German/Spanish Intensive 2A: PF21001/PG21001/PS21001
Semester 1, 20 credits

  • Reading comprehension, advanced dictionary skills, and contextualised report writing; formal letter writing
  • Giving your opinion, expressing preferences, oral presentation skills; telephone skills; job interview skills

Topic areas include education and student life, business and employment, geography and regional differences.

Read more about PF21001, PG21001 and PS21001

Practical French/German/Spanish 2A: PF21003/PG21003/PS21003
Semester 1, 20 credits

  • Reading comprehension and advanced dictionary skills, formal letter writing and textual synthesis
  • Interview skills and analysis of findings, debating skills

Topic areas include education and student life, business and employment, current affairs, contemporary social and cultural issues.

Read more about PF21003, PG21003 and PS21003

Practical French/German/Spanish Intensive 2B: PF22002/PG22002/PS22002
Semester 2, 20 credits

  • Listening comprehension, note taking and contextualised summary, individual written project
  • Investigative and interviewing skills and analysis of findings, skills of oral presentation and persuasion

Topic areas include environment and tourism, media and publicity, historical and political events.

Read more about PF22002, PG22002 and PS22002

Practical French/German/Spanish 2B: PF22004/PG22004/PS22004
Semester 2, 20 credits

  • Critical reading/listening and contextualised summary, individual written project
  • Organising and conducting opinion poll and evaluating data, advanced oral presentation skills

Topic areas include publicity, tourism, geography and regional differences, historical and political events, current affairs, contemporary social and cultural issues.

Read more about PF22004, PG22004 and PS22004

Languages degree information

Mathematics

 

Level 1

Mathematics 1A: MA11001
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module comprises Calculus component: Functions, Differential Calculus. Algebra and Geometry Component: Polynomials, Series, Trigonometry.

Mathematics 1B: MA12001
Semester 2, 20 credits
Calculus component: Application of differentiation to curve sketching, Integral Calculus. Algebra and Geometry Component: Vector and matric Geometry, Matrices and Linear Equations, Three dimensional Geometry.

 

Level 2

Mathematics 2A : MA21001
Semester 1, 20 credits
Geometry in three-dimensional space, vectors in three dimensions, linear equations and matrices, differential equations and functions of one variable, differentiation and integration.

Mathematics 2B: MA22001
Semester 2, 20 credits
Independence and bases, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear transformations, functions of several variables, multivariable calculus.

Discrete Mathematics: MA22003
Semester 1, 20 credits
Data analysis, statistical relationships, probability, binomial and normal distributions, difference equations, roots of a non-linear equation, Markov chains and game theory.

Mathematics degree information

Philosophy

 

Level 1

Plato and the Good Life: PI11006
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module introduces philosophy through the works of Plato and by asking the question: what is the good life? This question and Plato's answers to it are among the most enduring themes in the Western tradition of thought. The module will introduce Plato with a variety of philosophical texts focused on the 'good life'. Students will be exposed to a range of philosophical methods and approaches, from Platonic dialogue to recent essays, and will be introduced to key skills in philosophical reading and critical assessment.

Find out more about PI11006

Descartes, Thought and Reality: PI11007
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module will study the main concepts and methods of Descartes' Meditations and compare different philosophical conceptions of the relation between thought and reality, and mind and body. Students will develop a critical understanding of Descartes' position in modern western philosophy. The module will expose students to a range of philosophical methods and approaches, from Meditations to philosophical letters and essays, and will build key skills in philosophical reading and critical assessment.

Find out more about PI11007

 

Level 2

Existential Themes in Technology, Culture and Film: PI21004
Semester 1, 20 credits
Existentialism was a philosophical movement that reached its height of popularity in the mid-twentieth century and grew as a reaction to its philosophical predecessors whom it claimed had lost touch with the fundamental aim of philosophy—namely, to understand what it means to exist. Existentialism was also a reaction to the false optimism of progress that followed on from the Enlightenment and the sense of spiritual loss and political cynicism generated by the two World Wars.

This module will explore different types of existential philosophies and how the concerns they raise can be seen in contemporary forms of society and culture, such as technology, art and film. Students will therefore gain an understanding of a major movement within twentieth century philosophy and be able to apply this understanding critically in assessing significant forms of contemporary culture.

Find out more about PI21004

Aesthetics: PI22006
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module introduces the wide range of philosophical debates relating to Art and Aesthetics. Part One will focus on "Language and Aesthetics", Part Two focuses on Enlightenment Aesthetics and will introduce the principal tenets of Kant's aesthetics, and Part Three will discuss Kant's distinction between the beautiful and the sublime with reference to such contemporary philosophers as Lyotard. Part Four will introduce issues relating specifically to Art and Religion.

Find out more about PI22006

Philosophy degree information

Politics, European Politics and International Relations

 

Level 1

Politics and Public Policy: PO11001
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module looks at UK politics. It has three sections:

  • Political and civil institutions in the UK. Who actually governs the UK and how?
  • How we choose and influence our leaders and how civil society is maintained (e.g. law and order)
  • UK public policy in action

Read more about PO11001

The Globalising World: HU12001
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module highlights the connections between political, economic, social and cultural aspects of life in an increasingly "globalised" international environment and explores and evaluates the arguments surrounding the nature and extent of the process of globalization in the contemporary international system. The following key areas will be explored; the cold war world, decolonization, theories of post-colonialism and post-colonialism culture, power in the post-cold war world order, the processes of globalization, the united nations system, European integration, new security challenges and the emerging world economic order.

Read more about HU12001

 

Level 2

International Relations: PO21001
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module introduces you to the structures and processes which underlie the relationships between states and other actors in the contemporary international system. It looks at:

  • The international 'system': what it is and how it has developed
  • How the political world 'works' through examining the competing international relations theories
  • The processes that keep international relations 'moving': diplomacy, international law, international organisations and conflict

Find out more about PO21001

Comparative Politics: PO22002
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module provides an introduction to the study of comparative politics. It explores areas such as power, political culture, party systems and political behaviour. It does this through the study of:

  • Comparative methodology: how do we compare political systems?
  • Two case studies (usually two of Russia, the USA and Spain)

Find out more about PO22002

Politics degree information

Psychology

 

Level 1

Introductory Psychology 1: PY11001
Semester 1, 20 credits

  • Social psychology
    • dealing with the ways in which people influence one another and behave in groups
    • Learning Memory in Animals and Humans
    • Individual Differences with special reference to human personality
  • Science and Psychology
    • the influence science has on current thinking

Introductory Psychology 2: PY12002
Semester 2, 20 credits

  • Cognition - the process of perception, memory, imagination and language
  • Biological Psychology - the dependence of behaviour on the structure and functioning of the brain and nervous system
  • Developmental Psychology concerned with the emergence of thought, language and social awareness in infancy and childhood

 

Level 2

Neuropsychology and Language: PY21001
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module provides a grounding in theory and method in contemporary experimental psychology and emphasises (i) cognitive neuropsychology, the study of the effects of focal brain damage on perception, memory and thinking, (ii) human performance, especially attention, working memory and action; and (iii) psycholinguistics, including animal language, language acquisition, and language processing. Research skills are developed in each area through practical work and study of the principles of experimental design, statistical analysis of data, interpretation of results, and scientific reporting writing.

Perception and Development: PY22002
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module develops the study of theory and method in specific topics in contemporary experimental psychology. These include an introduction to visual perception and an overview of issues in developmental psychology. Students undertake practical projects in relation to each topic and apply their research skills in the design and interpretation of experiments and the statistical analysis and reporting of data.

Research skills for Psychologists : PY22003
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module covers the entire research process, from designing an experiment through to analysing the date that you collect. The course is split into three sections. In the 'Critical Thinking' section you will be taught how to find and critique existing psychological research. Within this module you will also learn more general academic skills such as finding/reading papers and writing critically about research. In the 'Research Methodology' section you will gain a solid grounding in the issues behind psychological research and methodology, including ethics. Finally, the course will include a section of 'Statistical Analysis'. Within this section you will learn some of the more advanced analyses used in psychological research, how to run them SPSS and how to write up and effectively present the analysis.

Psychology degree information

Town and Regional Planning

 

Level 1

Planning for Sustainable Cities: TP11001
Semester 1, 20 credits
Sustainable cities are places where people want to live and work. This module explores the challenge of creating liveable and sustainable cities and considers the role that urban planning can play in achieving this goal. It examines the origins of town planning, the historical context to planning and design, and the operation of land and property markets and explores contemporary and innovative examples of placemaking, including smart growth, eco-communities and neighbourhood governance.

Design and the Environment: TP12002
Semester 2, 20 credits
Good design can help society achieve a range of social, economic and environmental goals, creating places that are successful and sustainable. This module considers the main principles of design in the built environment. These design principles, such as scale, proportion, shape, form, colour, texture, pattern and composition are related to the components of the public realm, notably buildings, spaces and movement patterns.

Sustainable Development and the Environment: TP11003
Semester 1, 20 credits
The need for a more responsible approach to resource use is established and the achievement of sustainable development is considered at the international, national and local scale. This module explores the relationship between the concept of sustainable development and the application of policies designed to deliver sustainable outcomes. It considers the interface between sustainability and economic growth, and how this has been interpreted through policy initiatives at international, European, national and local level. Of particular interest is the way in which sustainability is being applied and implemented within the UK.

Countryside Planning and Management: TP12004
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module introduces students to the principal institutions concerned with the environment. It explores the practice of planning and development in the countryside and examines some of the major issues and concerns that have a bearing on planning and environmental management processes, such as affordable housing provision, wind farm developments and community land ownership.

 

Level 2

Design and Development - TP21001
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module develops student understanding of the operation of land and property markets, the pricing of land and land resources, investment in property and issues relating to residential, commercial, retail, recreational and cultural markets.

Planning Theory and Practice - TP22002
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module explores the main theories of planning, from the traditional view of planning as an exercise in physical design to more recent ideas of planning as a form of communicative action.

Management in the Built and Natural Environments: TP21009
Semester 1, 20 credits
This module examines management for environmental (built and natural) professionals and environmental projects.

Town and Regional Planning degree information