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Judith Kahl, European Studies student
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European Studies

MA (Hons)

You live and you will work in a new political, social and economic environment shaped by the Europe of the twenty-first century. Yours is a society in which national boundaries within Europe are becoming increasingly fluid, and in years to come there will be much lively debate about future directions.

By taking European Studies you will look at the forces which have moulded Europe and which will influence its, and your, future.

Why study European Studies at Dundee?

Here at Dundee, we have a long and well-established reputation in teaching European Studies.

We have been commended for our strongly interdisciplinary approach. During your studies, you will have opportunities to combine perspectives from economists, geographers, historians, lawyers, linguists, philosophers, cultural study specialists, as well as political analysts.

We will give you the historical background, but you will also look at issues that matter in Europe now, such as integration, migration, cultural identity, economic policy and governance.

The focus of our core courses is Europe-wide, including Russia, and the wide range of optional modules allows you to specialise. You can choose from a wide range of additional modules from within the School of Humanities and the College of Arts and Social Sciences.

What's so good about European Studies at Dundee?

You can combine your joint Honours European Studies degree with the study of French, German or Spanish should you wish to do so. (A range of other languages are also available as additional modules.)

We have also recently introduced a new degree: MA European Studies and European Languages & Culture, which allows you to study 2 languages from French, German or Spanish (one of which could be taken as a beginner from Level 1).

Ilze Plavgo graduated in 2009 with MA (Hons) European Studies and International Relations. She says:
"You are studying in a truly multi-cultural environment - both students and lecturers come from various countries, representing different cultures, with their personal insights and experiences, which made the learning process a lot more interesting."

Erasmus Exchanges

As a European Studies student, you will be particularly encouraged to go on an Erasmus exchange to one of our partner universities in Europe.

Judith Kahl is a 4th year student taking European Studies with French. She says:
"The option of studying European Studies with a language is a great opportunity. I find the cultural aspect of European studies really interesting so I decided to go to Grenoble in France on an Erasmus exchange in 3rd year. Even though I will admit that it was one of the hardest things I have ever done I am so glad I went and I have taken away so many insights and good memories, it was more than worth it."

More European Studies student and graduate profiles »

Field trips

We organise field trips to Brussels or Strasbourg from time to time.

Degree Combinations

Degree combinations with a language (choose from French, German, or Spanish)

  • MA European Studies and European Languages (two languages)
  • MA European Studies and English with one language
  • MA European Studies and History with one language
  • MA European Studies and International Relations with one language
  • MA European Studies and Philosophy with one language

Teaching & Assessment

This course is taught by the European Studies team based in the School of Humanities.

How you will be taught

The teaching and assessment methods vary between Levels. Initially the teaching is mainly lectures, where we will introduce a topic to you; you will be asked to find out more about the topic, and you will discuss the lectures and your own findings in tutorials.

As you deepen your understanding, the focus moves to seminars in which you will play a leading part by introducing your own research. At all stages we encourage teamwork in small groups.

What you will study - European Studies with a Foreign Language

Honours Degree

An honours degree normally takes four years, full time, you study levels 1-4, as described below.

Advanced Entry Honours Degree

It is possible to study for most of our honours degrees in three years if you have the required grades and subjects as listed in the Entry Requirements section. You study levels 2-4 below. There are definite advantages to considering this route as the time needed to study is reduced by one year which enables you to start working and earning earlier.

Typical Degree Programme

Visit the MA overview page for general information on our MA degree programme.

Level 1

Modules include:

  • The Globalising World: HU12001
    Semester 2, 20 credits
    This module highlights the connections between political, economic, social and cultural aspects of life in an increasingly "globalised" international environment and explores and evaluates the arguments surrounding the nature and extent of the process of globalization in the contemporary international system. The following key areas will be explored; the cold war world, decolonization, theories of post-colonialism and post-colonialism culture, power in the post-cold war world order, the processes of globalization, the united nations system, European integration, new security challenges and the emerging world economic order.

    Read more about HU12001

  • Two Level 1 modules in *Practical French or German or Spanish
  • One Level 1 core module in your other joint Honours subject
  • One of the following:
    • Age of Revolution c.1750 to 1850: HY11004
      Semester 2, 20 credits
      What do we mean by the term 'revolution' and are there differing definitions of what is meant by revolution when applied to events taking place across Europe and North America during the period 1750 to 1850? This module aims to address such questions by examining the political and social impact of revolution in America and France, the causes and consequences of Industrial Revolution in Britain, the revolution in ideas during the Enlightenment, over the period 1750 and 1850, and debates and interpretations about this 'age of revolution'. This module will also promote an awareness of a range of different approaches and sources which are available for the study of the past through a broad comparative survey of different peoples and different states.

      Find out more about HY11004

    • Plato and the Good Life: PI11006
      Semester 1, 20 credits
      This module introduces philosophy through the works of Plato and by asking the question: what is the good life? This question and Plato's answers to it are among the most enduring themes in the Western tradition of thought. The module will introduce Plato with a variety of philosophical texts focused on the 'good life'. Students will be exposed to a range of philosophical methods and approaches, from Platonic dialogue to recent essays, and will be introduced to key skills in philosophical reading and critical assessment.

      Find out more about PI11006

    • Descartes, Thought and Reality: PI11007
      Semester 2, 20 credits
      This module will study the main concepts and methods of Descartes' Meditations and compare different philosophical conceptions of the relation between thought and reality, and mind and body. Students will develop a critical understanding of Descartes' position in modern western philosophy. The module will expose students to a range of philosophical methods and approaches, from Meditations to philosophical letters and essays, and will build key skills in philosophical reading and critical assessment.

      Find out more about PI11007

    • Politics and Public Policy: PO11001
      Semester 1, 20 credits
      This module looks at UK politics. It has three sections:

      • Political and civil institutions in the UK. Who actually governs the UK and how?
      • How we choose and influence our leaders and how civil society is maintained (e.g. law and order)
      • UK public policy in action

      Read more about PO11001

  • One other MA module

*Please note: There are two languages streams in French, German and Spanish: one for those with a Higher or an A-Level; the other for complete or near beginners. In German there is only one stream for those with a Higher or A-Level.

Level 2

Modules include:

  • Contemporary Challenges for Europe: EU21002
    Semester 1, 20 credits
    The European Union faces many challenges including constitutional issues, the management of the single currency, the consequences of enlargement and the questions of national identity posed by migration. This module draws on ideas from geography, history, economics and politics to offer a unique perspective on important contemporary issues affecting the future of Europe.

    Read more about EU21002

  • One of the following:
    • Europe in Transition, 1870-1922: HY22004
      Semester 2, 20 credits
      How did Europe become 'modern'? Globalisation started already in the 19th century with the transition from slow moving agricultural societies to modern, fast-moving, inter-connected, industrial societies with mass-politics and mass-culture, extending from Europe across the globe. This module provides you with a survey of the major aspects of political, economic, social and cultural developments in Europe from 1870 to 1922. This was an age of rapid transition from pre-democratic, agricultural village society to urban mass-society, globalising economic structures, rising prosperity and political democratisation.

      Find out more about HY22004

    • Hume and Recent European Philosophy (problems of the self): PI22002
      Semester 1, 20 credits

      This module covers two topics: the work of the great Scottish philosopher, David Hume, and the Continental tradition of phenomenology. Hume wrote during the Enlightenment, a period in which the European intellectual climate was characterised by a rejection of dogmatism and superstition, a stress on human nature, faith in science, and optimism in the use of reason as a power by which humans may understand the universe. While Hume fully embraces the first three of these, he aimed to curb over-inflated confidence in the power of reason. We study his arguments critically and in depth. In the second part of this module we enquire into the nature of subjectivity in the phenomenological and existentialist philosophy, of Edmund Husserl, Jean-Paul Sartre, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Simone de Beauvoir. Through their radical understanding of perception, embodiment and freedom, we will re-think many of the traditional philosophical approaches to meaning and reality.

      Read more about PI22002

    • Comparative Politics: PO22002
      Semester 2, 20 credits
      This module provides an introduction to the study of comparative politics. It explores areas such as power, political culture, party systems and political behaviour. It does this through the study of:

      • Comparative methodology: how do we compare political systems?
      • Two case studies (usually two of Russia, the USA and Spain)

      Find out more about PO22002

  • Two Level 2 modules in Practical French or German or Spanish
  • One Level 2 core module in your other joint Honours subject
  • Additional MA module
Level 3

A total of 4 modules, including:

Please note: Alternatively, the whole or part of Level 3 can be spent studying at a partner university in Denmark, France, Germany, Poland, Spain or Turkey.

Level 4

A total of 4 modules, including:

What you will study - European Studies without a Foreign Language

Honours Degree

An honours degree normally takes four years, full time, you study levels 1-4, as described below.

Advanced Entry Honours Degree

It is possible to study for most of our honours degrees in three years if you have the required grades and subjects as listed in the Entry Requirements section. You study levels 2-4 below. There are definite advantages to considering this route as the time needed to study is reduced by one year which enables you to start working and earning earlier.

Typical Degree Programme

Visit the MA overview page for general information on our MA degree programme.

Level 1

Modules include:

  • The Globalising World: HU12001
    Semester 2, 20 credits
    This module highlights the connections between political, economic, social and cultural aspects of life in an increasingly "globalised" international environment and explores and evaluates the arguments surrounding the nature and extent of the process of globalization in the contemporary international system. The following key areas will be explored; the cold war world, decolonization, theories of post-colonialism and post-colonialism culture, power in the post-cold war world order, the processes of globalization, the united nations system, European integration, new security challenges and the emerging world economic order.

    Read more about HU12001

  • One of the following:
    • Age of Revolution c.1750 to 1850: HY11004
      Semester 2, 20 credits
      What do we mean by the term 'revolution' and are there differing definitions of what is meant by revolution when applied to events taking place across Europe and North America during the period 1750 to 1850? This module aims to address such questions by examining the political and social impact of revolution in America and France, the causes and consequences of Industrial Revolution in Britain, the revolution in ideas during the Enlightenment, over the period 1750 and 1850, and debates and interpretations about this 'age of revolution'. This module will also promote an awareness of a range of different approaches and sources which are available for the study of the past through a broad comparative survey of different peoples and different states.

      Find out more about HY11004

    • Plato and the Good Life: PI11006
      Semester 1, 20 credits
      This module introduces philosophy through the works of Plato and by asking the question: what is the good life? This question and Plato's answers to it are among the most enduring themes in the Western tradition of thought. The module will introduce Plato with a variety of philosophical texts focused on the 'good life'. Students will be exposed to a range of philosophical methods and approaches, from Platonic dialogue to recent essays, and will be introduced to key skills in philosophical reading and critical assessment.

      Find out more about PI11006

    • Descartes, Thought and Reality: PI11007
      Semester 2, 20 credits
      This module will study the main concepts and methods of Descartes' Meditations and compare different philosophical conceptions of the relation between thought and reality, and mind and body. Students will develop a critical understanding of Descartes' position in modern western philosophy. The module will expose students to a range of philosophical methods and approaches, from Meditations to philosophical letters and essays, and will build key skills in philosophical reading and critical assessment.

      Find out more about PI11007

    • Politics and Public Policy: PO11001
      Semester 1, 20 credits
      This module looks at UK politics. It has three sections:

      • Political and civil institutions in the UK. Who actually governs the UK and how?
      • How we choose and influence our leaders and how civil society is maintained (e.g. law and order)
      • UK public policy in action

      Read more about PO11001

  • One Level 1 core module in your other joint Honours subject
  • Additional modules: visit the MA overview page for more information
Level 2

Modules include:

  • Contemporary Challenges for Europe: EU21002
    Semester 1, 20 credits
    The European Union faces many challenges including constitutional issues, the management of the single currency, the consequences of enlargement and the questions of national identity posed by migration. This module draws on ideas from geography, history, economics and politics to offer a unique perspective on important contemporary issues affecting the future of Europe.

    Read more about EU21002

  • One of the following:
    • Europe in Transition, 1870-1922: HY22004
      Semester 2, 20 credits
      How did Europe become 'modern'? Globalisation started already in the 19th century with the transition from slow moving agricultural societies to modern, fast-moving, inter-connected, industrial societies with mass-politics and mass-culture, extending from Europe across the globe. This module provides you with a survey of the major aspects of political, economic, social and cultural developments in Europe from 1870 to 1922. This was an age of rapid transition from pre-democratic, agricultural village society to urban mass-society, globalising economic structures, rising prosperity and political democratisation.

      Find out more about HY22004

    • Hume and Recent European Philosophy (problems of the self): PI22002
      Semester 1, 20 credits

      This module covers two topics: the work of the great Scottish philosopher, David Hume, and the Continental tradition of phenomenology. Hume wrote during the Enlightenment, a period in which the European intellectual climate was characterised by a rejection of dogmatism and superstition, a stress on human nature, faith in science, and optimism in the use of reason as a power by which humans may understand the universe. While Hume fully embraces the first three of these, he aimed to curb over-inflated confidence in the power of reason. We study his arguments critically and in depth. In the second part of this module we enquire into the nature of subjectivity in the phenomenological and existentialist philosophy, of Edmund Husserl, Jean-Paul Sartre, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Simone de Beauvoir. Through their radical understanding of perception, embodiment and freedom, we will re-think many of the traditional philosophical approaches to meaning and reality.

      Read more about PI22002

    • Comparative Politics: PO22002
      Semester 2, 20 credits
      This module provides an introduction to the study of comparative politics. It explores areas such as power, political culture, party systems and political behaviour. It does this through the study of:

      • Comparative methodology: how do we compare political systems?
      • Two case studies (usually two of Russia, the USA and Spain)

      Find out more about PO22002

  • One Level 2 core module in your other joint Honours subject
  • Additional MA modules: visit the MA overview page for more information
Level 3

A total of 4 modules, including:

Level 4

A total of 4 modules, including:

What you will study - European Studies and European Languages & Culture

Honours Degree

An honours degree normally takes four years, full time, you study levels 1-4, as described below.

Advanced Entry Honours Degree

It is possible to study for most of our honours degrees in three years if you have the required grades and subjects as listed in the Entry Requirements section. You study levels 2-4 below. There are definite advantages to considering this route as the time needed to study is reduced by one year which enables you to start working and earning earlier.

Typical Degree Programme

Visit the MA overview page for general information on our MA degree programme.

Level 1

Modules include:

The Globalising World: HU12001
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module highlights the connections between political, economic, social and cultural aspects of life in an increasingly "globalised" international environment and explores and evaluates the arguments surrounding the nature and extent of the process of globalization in the contemporary international system. The following key areas will be explored; the cold war world, decolonization, theories of post-colonialism and post-colonialism culture, power in the post-cold war world order, the processes of globalization, the united nations system, European integration, new security challenges and the emerging world economic order.

Read more about HU12001

  • Language 1 - Two Level 1 modules in *Practical French or German or Spanish
  • Language 2 - Two Level 1 modules in *Practical French or German or Spanish

Plus one of the following modules:

  • Age of Revolution c.1750 to 1850: HY11004
    Semester 2, 20 credits
    What do we mean by the term 'revolution' and are there differing definitions of what is meant by revolution when applied to events taking place across Europe and North America during the period 1750 to 1850? This module aims to address such questions by examining the political and social impact of revolution in America and France, the causes and consequences of Industrial Revolution in Britain, the revolution in ideas during the Enlightenment, over the period 1750 and 1850, and debates and interpretations about this 'age of revolution'. This module will also promote an awareness of a range of different approaches and sources which are available for the study of the past through a broad comparative survey of different peoples and different states.

    Find out more about HY11004

  • Plato and the Good Life: PI11006
    Semester 1, 20 credits
    This module introduces philosophy through the works of Plato and by asking the question: what is the good life? This question and Plato's answers to it are among the most enduring themes in the Western tradition of thought. The module will introduce Plato with a variety of philosophical texts focused on the 'good life'. Students will be exposed to a range of philosophical methods and approaches, from Platonic dialogue to recent essays, and will be introduced to key skills in philosophical reading and critical assessment.

    Find out more about PI11006

  • Descartes, Thought and Reality: PI11007
    Semester 2, 20 credits
    This module will study the main concepts and methods of Descartes' Meditations and compare different philosophical conceptions of the relation between thought and reality, and mind and body. Students will develop a critical understanding of Descartes' position in modern western philosophy. The module will expose students to a range of philosophical methods and approaches, from Meditations to philosophical letters and essays, and will build key skills in philosophical reading and critical assessment.

    Find out more about PI11007

  • Politics and Public Policy: PO11001
    Semester 1, 20 credits
    This module looks at UK politics. It has three sections:

    • Political and civil institutions in the UK. Who actually governs the UK and how?
    • How we choose and influence our leaders and how civil society is maintained (e.g. law and order)
    • UK public policy in action

    Read more about PO11001

*Please note: There are two languages streams in French and Spanish: one for those with a Higher or an A-Level; the other for complete or near beginners. In German there is only one stream for those with a Higher or A-Level.

Level 2

Modules include:

Contemporary Challenges for Europe: EU21002
Semester 1, 20 credits
The European Union faces many challenges including constitutional issues, the management of the single currency, the consequences of enlargement and the questions of national identity posed by migration. This module draws on ideas from geography, history, economics and politics to offer a unique perspective on important contemporary issues affecting the future of Europe.

Read more about EU21002

  • Language 1 - Two Level 2 modules in *Practical French or German or Spanish
  • Language 2 - Two Level 2 modules in *Practical French or German or Spanish

Plus one of the following modules:

Modules include:

The Globalising World: HU12001
Semester 2, 20 credits
This module highlights the connections between political, economic, social and cultural aspects of life in an increasingly "globalised" international environment and explores and evaluates the arguments surrounding the nature and extent of the process of globalization in the contemporary international system. The following key areas will be explored; the cold war world, decolonization, theories of post-colonialism and post-colonialism culture, power in the post-cold war world order, the processes of globalization, the united nations system, European integration, new security challenges and the emerging world economic order.

Read more about HU12001

Plus one of the following:

  • Europe in Transition, 1870-1922: HY22004
    Semester 2, 20 credits
    How did Europe become 'modern'? Globalisation started already in the 19th century with the transition from slow moving agricultural societies to modern, fast-moving, inter-connected, industrial societies with mass-politics and mass-culture, extending from Europe across the globe. This module provides you with a survey of the major aspects of political, economic, social and cultural developments in Europe from 1870 to 1922. This was an age of rapid transition from pre-democratic, agricultural village society to urban mass-society, globalising economic structures, rising prosperity and political democratisation.

    Find out more about HY22004

  • Hume and Recent European Philosophy (problems of the self): PI22002
    Semester 1, 20 credits

    This module covers two topics: the work of the great Scottish philosopher, David Hume, and the Continental tradition of phenomenology. Hume wrote during the Enlightenment, a period in which the European intellectual climate was characterised by a rejection of dogmatism and superstition, a stress on human nature, faith in science, and optimism in the use of reason as a power by which humans may understand the universe. While Hume fully embraces the first three of these, he aimed to curb over-inflated confidence in the power of reason. We study his arguments critically and in depth. In the second part of this module we enquire into the nature of subjectivity in the phenomenological and existentialist philosophy, of Edmund Husserl, Jean-Paul Sartre, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Simone de Beauvoir. Through their radical understanding of perception, embodiment and freedom, we will re-think many of the traditional philosophical approaches to meaning and reality.

    Read more about PI22002

  • Comparative Politics: PO22002
    Semester 2, 20 credits
    This module provides an introduction to the study of comparative politics. It explores areas such as power, political culture, party systems and political behaviour. It does this through the study of:

    • Comparative methodology: how do we compare political systems?
    • Two case studies (usually two of Russia, the USA and Spain)

    Find out more about PO22002

*Please note: There are two languages streams in French and Spanish, depending on your qualifications/ experience on entry.

Level 3

A total of 4 modules, including:

Please note: Alternatively, the whole or part of Level 3 can be spent studying at a partner university in France, Germany or Spain

Level 4

A total of 4 modules, including:

How you will be assessed

At all Levels exam and continuous assessment marks are combined to arrive at your final grade. For continuous assessment at Levels 1 and 2, you usually write essays on topics chosen by your tutor, but by the time you are in Levels 3 and 4 you will often tackle projects and presentations on subjects of your own choice.

Careers

As a European Studies graduate, you will have gained a range of transferable skills during your studies, including skills in research, written and oral presentation, and intercultural mediation skills.

Our graduates work in a range of areas, including education, archives, politics, government services, journalism, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), with some starting their own businesses.

Pawel Jurczak, from Poland, graduated with a degree in Contemporary European Studies and now works in event management.

Pawel says: "Studying European Studies outside Poland among other international students couldn't have been a better lifetime experience. It helped me develop my communication skills, and boost my confidence and cultural awareness. All these factors count a lot in my current job."

See more European Studies student and graduate profiles »

Postgraduate study

Some graduates have continued their studies with us at postgraduate level, studying one of a range of MLitt Humanities programmes on offer.

Entry Requirements

The following are the minimum requirements, please note qualifications have to be obtained at the first sitting of examinations.

Please note that the entry requirements in our printed prospectus may be subject to change. The entry requirements listed below are up to date and should be referred to in case of any discrepancy.

Courses starting September 2014

Level 1 entry

Qualification Minimum Grade Typical Grade
SQA Higher BBBB AABB
GCE A-Level BCC BBB
ILC Higher AABB
IB Diploma 30 points (including 5, 5, 5 at Higher Level)
Essential Subjects None, but see requirements for other Joint Honours subjects
EU & International Visit our EU and International webpages for entry requirements tailored to your home country

Advanced Entry (to Level 2)

Qualification Grade
SQA Advanced Higher AB (Advanced Higher) + BB (Higher) in different subjects
GCE A-Level ABB
IB Diploma 34 points (including 6, 6, 5 at Higher Level)
Essential Subjects None, but see requirements for other Joint Honours subjects

Other Qualifications

Qualification Grade
SQA A relevant HNC with grade B in the Graded Unit (Level 1 entry)
A relevant HND with grade BB in the Graded Units (Level 2 entry)
Scottish Baccalaureate Pass with CC at Advanced Higher (Level 1 entry)
Distinction with AB at Advanced Higher (Level 2 entry)
SWAP Access Programmes Relevant subjects with ABB grades to include English Literature/Language at SCQF Level 6 and Communication 4 plus Literature 1 (Level 1 entry)
EDEXCEL A relevant BTEC Extended Diploma with DDM (Level 1 entry)
A relevant BTEC Extended Diploma with DDD (Level 2 entry)
Advanced Diploma Grade B with ASL-A Level at B (Level 1 entry)
Grade A with ASL-A Level at B (Level 2 entry)
Welsh Baccalaureate Pass with A Levels at BB (Level 1 entry)
Pass with A Levels at AA (Level 2 entry)
European Baccalaureate

70% overall with 7 in English (Level 1 entry)
75% overall with 7.5 in English (Level 2 entry)

Entry to English Literature courses requires Higher at B, A-Level at C or equivalent in English/English Literature.
Applicants with alternative overseas qualifications should visit the relevant country page on our International website.

Joint Honours Degrees

For details of typical entry requirements for joint honours degrees, please visit the relevant webpage for the other subject.

Courses starting September 2015

Level 1 entry

Qualification Minimum Grade Typical Grade
SQA Higher BBBB AABB
GCE A-Level BCC BBB
ILC Higher AABB
IB Diploma 30 points (including 5, 5, 5 at Higher Level)
Essential Subjects None, but see requirements for other Joint Honours subjects
EU & International Visit our EU and International webpages for entry requirements tailored to your home country

Advanced Entry (to Level 2)

Qualification Grade
SQA Advanced Higher AB (Advanced Higher) + BB (Higher) in different subjects
GCE A-Level ABB
IB Diploma 34 points (including 6, 6, 5 at Higher Level)
Essential Subjects None, but see requirements for other Joint Honours subjects

Other Qualifications

Qualification Grade
SQA A relevant HNC with grade B in the Graded Unit (Level 1 entry)
A relevant HND with grade BB in the Graded Units (Level 2 entry)
Scottish Baccalaureate Pass with CC at Advanced Higher (Level 1 entry)
Distinction with AB at Advanced Higher (Level 2 entry)
SWAP Access Programmes Relevant subjects with ABB grades to include English Literature/Language at SCQF Level 6 and Communication 4 plus Literature 1 (Level 1 entry)
EDEXCEL A relevant BTEC Extended Diploma with DDM (Level 1 entry)
A relevant BTEC Extended Diploma with DDD (Level 2 entry)
Advanced Diploma Grade B with ASL-A Level at B (Level 1 entry)
Grade A with ASL-A Level at B (Level 2 entry)
Welsh Baccalaureate Pass with A Levels at BB (Level 1 entry)
Pass with A Levels at AA (Level 2 entry)
European Baccalaureate

70% overall with 7 in English (Level 1 entry)
75% overall with 7.5 in English (Level 2 entry)

Entry to English Literature courses requires Higher at B, A-Level at C or equivalent in English/English Literature.
Applicants with alternative overseas qualifications should visit the relevant country page on our International website.

Joint Honours Degrees

For details of typical entry requirements for joint honours degrees, please visit the relevant webpage for the other subject.

English Language Pre-Sessional Programmes

We offer Pre-Sessional programmes and Foundation Programme(s) which are designed to prepare you for university study, the 24 week and 10 week programmes provide additional English Language tuition for students who do not meet our minimum English Language requirements by up to 1.0 IELTS and 0.5 IELTS respectively. Successful completion of these programmes guarantees progression to various degrees at the University of Dundee as long as you hold a relevant offer. The 30 week (one Academic Year) Foundation Programme(s) allow applicants who have not met our typical academic entry requirements, and require additional English Language support by up to 1.0 to 1.5 IELTS, to gain the necessary qualifications to enter the University of Dundee degree programmes in the following year.

Fees and Funding

There have been many changes to the arrangements for funding students entering higher education in recent years, yet a degree from the University of Dundee, with its high rate of employment success, remains a cost-effective option.

The fees you pay will, in most cases, depend on your current country of residence.

The fee shown is annual, and may be subject to an increase each year.

Fee category Fees for students starting September 2014
Scottish students £1,820 per year of study.
You can apply to the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government.
Students from the rest of the UK £9,000 per year, for a maximum of 3 years, even if you are studying a four year degree.
You can apply for financial assistance, including a loan to cover the full cost of the tuition fees, from the Student Loan Company.
EU students £1,820 per year of study.
You can apply to the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government.
Overseas students (non-EU) £10,700 per year of study.

Scholarships and Bursaries

Fee category Scholarships & Bursaries applicable
Scottish students
Students from the rest of the UK
EU students
Overseas students (non-EU)

Living Costs

  • Dundee is ranked as one of the most affordable places for students to live in the UK, and the cost of living is around 15% cheaper than the UK average.
  • Increasing numbers of students are successfully undertaking part-time work to supplement their income. You can get advice from our Careers Service, both about job opportunities and how to find a suitable study/work/life balance. EU and international students are also allowed to work up to 20 hours per week.
  • As a student in Scotland, you have free access to the National Health Service. Visits to doctors and hospitals, as well as prescriptions, sight tests and dental checkups, are available free of charge.

Your Application

All applications must be made through UCAS

UCAS Codes

Institution Code: D65

Degree
UCAS Codes
KIS data
MA European Studies and Business Economics with Marketing
LNR0
View KIS data for this course
MA European Studies and Economics
LR18
View KIS data for this course
MA European Studies and English
QR38
View KIS data for this course
MA European Studies and European Languages & Culture
RR89
View KIS data for this course
MA European Studies and Geography
LR78
View KIS data for this course
MA European Studies and History
RV81
View KIS data for this course
MA European Studies and International Relations
LR28
View KIS data for this course
MA European Studies and Philosophy
RV85
View KIS data for this course
MA European Studies and Psychology
CR88
View KIS data for this course

UCAS Application Process


International Applicants

We have information specifically for international applicants on our International website:

What skills, qualities and experience do I need?

The Dundee MA degrees follow the distinctive pattern of many Scottish universities by offering a broad-based education that requires you to study a number of different subjects in Levels 1 and 2 (Level 2 only for Advanced Entry Honours degrees). You do not have to finalise your choice of degree course until you are better able to appreciate both the nature of the subjects you are studying and the relationships between them. However, you must make an initial choice of course on the application form and we would expect you to provide some evidence of your enthusiasm for your chosen course and details of any relevant experience.

We use a range of learning methods at Dundee: you will be expected to respond to the information and advice provided by academic staff, especially in lectures; to prepare for and participate in tutorial discussion or to work in practical classes; to work individually or in groups on set assignments such as essays and projects; and to 'read round' the subject. Consequently, we are looking for evidence that you are capable of working systematically, of responding to the guidance of your teachers, and that you have both the ability and enthusiasm to successfully complete a degree programme.

This is an interdisciplinary programme to which the study of economics, geography, history, law, languages, philosophy and politics all contribute. So it would be helpful if you can indicate any particular experience, or interest, you may have in any of these subjects. Some interest in a historical approach to European matters will be appropriate, but so will an interest in current affairs, as the course is much concerned with the issues which confront Europe at present. Any sort of evidence that you have a serious interest in, and intelligent awareness of, contemporary Europe would be of help to you.

Mature students may relate how any life experiences will enhance their approaches to the study of history.

Tips for your application

What is important to us, in your application, is the evidence provided by the grades you have attained, or are predicted to attain, in your examinations, along with whatever you and your referee can point to indicating both your special interest in any of our subject areas, and your general liveliness of mind.

Your personal statement is an opportunity to say why you should be offered a place to study in Dundee. We are looking for applicants with an ability to express opinions clearly with reasoned support and evidence, who are open to critical guidance, and who have a commitment to high standards of achievement in all they do. These qualities can be demonstrated through academic attainment, paid or voluntary work, and extra-curricular activities of all kinds.

Referees should concisely indicate your analytical abilities, communication skills, capacity for academic work, and commitment to your studies. We will be interested to hear about examples of initiative, leadership, and any evidence of organisational skills. Indicators of a positive outlook and engagement with social and cultural activities will be welcome, as will an assessment of your potential to develop in the university environment.

We will consider applications to one or more MA courses at Dundee: each application will be considered on its merits. We are looking for applicants who either have achieved, or will achieve, the published requirements in terms of Highers, Advanced Highers, A-Levels or acceptable alternative qualifications.

Advanced Entry Honours Degree

It is possible to study for most of our honours degrees in 3 years if you have the required grades and subjects as listed in the Entry Requirements section. There are definite advantages to considering this route as the time needed to study is reduced by one year which enables you to start working and earning earlier.

Any questions?

If you have any further questions about the application process, please contact:

Home / EU applicants

Undergraduate Admissions
Admissions & Student Recruitment
University of Dundee
Nethergate
Dundee
DD1 4HN
Scotland

Telephone: 01382 388074/ 388585/ 384370 (from the UK)
Telephone: +44 1382 01382 388074/ 388585/ 384370 (from outside the UK)

Contact Us

International applicants

International Office
Admissions & Student Recruitment
University of Dundee
Nethergate
Dundee
DD1 4HN
Scotland

Telephone: 01382 388 111 (from the UK)
Telephone: +44 1382 388 111 (from outside the UK)

Contact Us