Culture & Arts Forum

The Culture & Arts Forum is an informal network which aims to support and promote the various departments within the University that are involved in cultural activity. At present the following departments, units and services are represented on the Forum:

Click on any of the above to find out what each of us is up to.






2014 Culture Day - Wednesday 1 October

Heroes & Villains

The Tenth Annual University of Dundee Culture Day

 

Organised by the Culture & Arts Forum in collaboration with the Centre for Scottish Culture

Part of Scottish Heroes & Villains Month

Wednesday 1 October 2014

Baxter Room 1.36, Tower Building

 

Free admission – all welcome

 

1.30     Welcome

1.35     Graeme Stevenson (Music) – The Sounds of Victory

Graeme will be performing music composed to commemorate Admiral Duncan's victory at the Battle of Camperdown, including Dussek’s The Naval Battle and Total Defeat of the Grand Dutch Fleet by Admiral Duncan

1.55     Eddie Small (Creative Writing) - The Villainous Hero: McGonagall the Spoilsport

Debate rages over McGonagall's ‘poetry’ : was it intentionally, and therefore Villainously, bad, or did our Hero simply strive to do his best, stoically oblivious to criticism, abuse and derision? By examining contemporaneous sources, we will now definitively solve this age-old conundrum once and for all.

2.10     Jan Merchant (Archive Services) - My Hero, the Archivist

Archives are the repositories of our personal and community histories and identities. The mission for archivists is to care, manage and provide access to records that tell stories, provide evidence, and offer insights into our history. This talk illustrates the heroic range of projects, enquiries and activities that archivists do to engage, inform, educate and testify.

2.25     Billy Kenefick & Derek Patrick (History)Architect of Victory?: Douglas Haig and the Great War

Douglas Haig remains a divisive figure. For many Haig is largely responsible for tens of thousands of Great War dead, an obstinate and detached commander-in-chief, whose refusal to engage with new technology cost the lives of many of his men. Criticised by later politicians and pilloried by historians, Haig’s reputation has suffered, conditioning public perceptions of the man who arguably led the British army to its greatest victory. However, in the wake of the Great War, the Field Marshal enjoyed unprecedented popularity, working tirelessly for veterans’ charities. This paper will explore the man and the myth in an attempt to establish whether he was a hero or villain.

2.40     Break for Refreshments

3.00     Matthew Jarron (Museum Services) – The Celtic Revival in Dundee – heroes in art at the turn of the century

Led by the painter John Duncan, Dundee became one of the major centres for the Celtic Revival movement in the late 19th and early 20th century. This talk will explore this fascinating period of art and culture, and show that many of the paintings and murals created during this period depicted great heroes of Scottish history and legend.

3.15     Neil Paterson (Botanic Garden) – Sweden 0 England 1: Carl Linnaeus, John Ray and the Naming of Names

The Swedish botanist Linnaeus enjoys a largely undeserved reputation as the father of scientific plant classification; in this talk Neil will argue that that honour should belong to the almost unknown Englishman John Ray.

3.30     Dominic Smith (Philosophy) – Committed to the Flames: David Hume, Hero or Villain?

David Hume was a man of many real or apparent contradictions – a proud Scot who ardently supported Union with England; one of the most celebrated British philosophers, who, to this day, is still listed as an ‘historian’ in his official citation at the British Library; and a librarian who famously claimed that certain types of book should be ‘commit[ted]… to the flames’. This talk will attempt to lay out some of the contradictions surrounding Hume, and to see through some of their ‘villainous’ and ‘heroic’ implications. Above all, Hume was a great debunker of myth and mysticism, and this, Dominic will argue, is where his true ‘heroism’ (or is it ‘villainy’?) resides for us. 

3.45     Rebecca Brown (Continuing Education) – Shakespeare’s Heroes and Villains

In this presentation, Rebecca will offer a (very) brief exploration of the divided self of Shakespeare's tragic figures.

4.00     Break for Refreshments

4.15     Susan Mains (Geography) – Pirates of the Caribbean: Resistance, Security and Nostalgia in Jamaican Seascapes

In recent years we have come to associate images of Caribbean pirates with big budget Hollywood depictions of witty scoundrels and subversive heroes. Exploring the context of Jamaica, this presentation digs a little deeper to explore some of the hidden stories surrounding a range of historical and contemporary pirates, and the implications these have for our understandings of local, national and transnational geographies.

4.30     Karen Petrie (Computing) – The Women of Station X

Bletchley Park was the central location for the UK's code breaking efforts during World War Two. It is not well-known that women made up the majority of the personnel and made a significant contribution to the code breaking.‚Äč This talk (organised by the University’s Revealing Research) will try to tell some of these women's stories. 

4.45     Brian Hoyle (Film Studies) – Henry Fonda Shot Me in the Face While James Cagney Tap-Danced and Other Unusual Tales of Hollywood Heroes and Villains

The Hollywood studio system carefully cultivated the images of its stars and were often reluctant to allow them to display the full range of their acting talents in order to preserve that image. However, many of the most memorable performances by Hollywood stars came in works where they were cast against type, with the heroes exploring their darker side or screen heavies displaying disarming charm and kindness. This paper will look at the roles of several great actors including Henry Fonda, James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, Fred MacMurray, Kirk Douglas and Lee Marvin.  

5.00     JOOT Theatre Company – Herod the Great

The company will end our event with a dramatised reading of the mediaeval Mystery pageant Herod the Great from the Wakefield Cycle

5.30     End


2013 Culture Day - Wednesday 16 October

 

Forbidden Fruit: Appetite & Desire

A free afternoon event featuring a fascinating range of talks, music and drama

Wednesday 16 October 2013, 1.45-5.30pm
Baxter Conference Room 1.36, Tower Building, University of Dundee

Admission Free - all welcome!

Programme

1.45 welcome

2pm  Graeme Stevenson (Music) – Bach’s Coffee Cantata

The Coffee Cantata is about the closest Bach came to opera. Written to be performed in Zimmermann’s Coffee House in Leipzigit tells the tale of Herr Schlendrian and his daughter Lieschen. She is addicted to coffee and her father is trying to persuade her to give up the “evil drink”. Our soloists are Jill Harrison (soprano),Mike Towers (tenor) and Alister Allan (bass) and the band is made up of students led by Beth Wyllie.

2.30pm Neil Paterson (Botanic Garden) - Eat at your peril!: taste, poison and mimicry in evolution

A very long time ago, the Plant Kingdom made a momentous decision to adopt a sedentary lifestyle.  This means that plants have evolved chemical defences against animals and other plants leading to bad tastes and poisons. Unpalatability also features as a defence mechanism in the Animal Kingdom leading to the evolution of the amazing phenomenon of mimicry.

2.45pm Jackie Malcolm (Design, DJCAD) – Food as a Trigger for Memory

Our food is driven by our culture and it can offer us a rich source of information about life as it is has been lived and is being lived. This talk will provide insights into life in Dundee, through natural conversations recorded with elderly people, at four sheltered housing locations in the city. Looking back to the 1950s we will observe just how much our food has changed.

3pm break

3.20pm  Trevor Harley (Psychology) - Living to a budget

How much do we need to spend on food to live healthily? How easy it is to stick to a budget? What can be done to make it more likely that we will follow our budget and our good intentions? I review my recent attempt to live economically for a month.

3.35pm  Caroline Brown (Archive Services) – Chicago, Dundee and Paris: the passions and prejudice of a 19th-century Dundonian

John James Dalyell was born in France in 1835 but lived most of his life in Dundee and Angus. Using one of his many letter books held by the University Archives this talk will examine his interests and concerns over a period of four years between 1868 and 1872. Dalyell was a keen cricketer and golfer, with an interest in foreign affairs, particularly in America and France. Sadly in 1872 Dalyell began suffering with severe head pains which were to lead to his admission to Sunnyside Asylum in Montrose where he stayed until his death.

3.50pm  Brian Hoyle (English) - In America they wash their Oysters. It kills the taste: Food, Sex and Death in European Cinema

This talk will examine references to food and eating in the work of some of the great European filmmakers, ranging from mouth-watering feasts the pepper the films of Claude Chabrol; to the cibophobia of Jan Svankmajer; to the surreal, scatological world of Luis Bunuel. 

4.05pm break

4.30pm  Dominic Smith (Philosophy) - The Appetite for Paradox: Critical Reflections on Contemporary Internet Culture

Since the dawn of philosophy with Plato, paradoxes have been emphasised as important provocations for thought and creativity. This talk will examine how contemporary online culture relates to this. Does the Internet expose us to too few paradoxes, or to too many?

4.45pm Annie Tindley (History) - Appetites of the Flesh: scandal, money and inheritance in the British Aristocracy, 1880-1895

In September 1892, the 3rd Duke of Sutherland, one of Britain’s richest patrician landowners, died, leaving his multi-million pound inheritance to his second wife, the Duchess Caroline. His son, the 4th Duke, was forced to take her to court for his inheritance, a process that saw one of them jailed, and was finally settled out of court. This talk will explore this episode, feverishly followed by the media, and will consider the nature of sensation and celebrity gossip in the high Victorian age.

5pm  JOOT Theatre Company – the Seven Deadly Sins scene from Marlowe's Dr. Faustus

5.30pm finish


2012 Culture Day - Wednesday 3 October

Feeling Good? - Health, Well-Being and the Arts

A free afternoon event featuring a fascinating range of presentations exploring the connections between culture & the arts and health & well-being

Wednesday 3 October 2012, 1.45-5pm
Baxter Conference Room 1.36, Tower Building, University of Dundee

Admission Free - all welcome!

 

Provisional Programme:

1.45pm Welcome

1.50pm

Matthew Jarron (Museum Services)

Art with a Smile: Dentist art collectors in Dundee

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Dundee was one of Britain’s major art centres, with many enthusiastic patrons building up large private collections. Unusually, several of these were involved in dentistry, and this talk will reveal something of their exceptional activities.

2.05pm

Paul Harrison (Visual Research Centre, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design)

Connections: Art, Science and Multi-cultures

This presentation will reflect on some of the recent projects that Paul has undertaken addressing issues at the intersection of art, science and society.

2.20pm

Neil Paterson (Botanic Garden)

On Being Happy: Epicureans in the Garden

Our health is intimately connected to our mental attitudes and approach to life.  The Greeks advocated living the Good Life but what precisely is that to be - Epicurus had an interesting answer.

2.35pm

Brian Hoyle (English, School of Humanities)

Please Mrs Plunket, You're Squashing My Itinerary 

This presentation promises an in-depth reading of some of the Carry On and Doctor films - a plucky tribute to socialised medicine, Hattie and Sid.

2.50pm Refreshments

3.10pm

Sandra Wilson (Jewellery & Metal Design, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design)

Jewellery, Superstition and Well-being

This talk will explore recent research into superstitious jewellery, demonstrating the connections between values, beliefs, materials and ways of working, and suggesting a continued relevance of this approach for well-being in the 21st century.  

3.25pm

Beth Lord (Philosophy, School of Humanities)

Equality, philosophy, and well-being

Many philosophers believe that living a good life requires us to adopt some principle of human equality. But what kind of equality should we aim for to ensure the well-being of individuals, groups, and communities? In this short talk I will suggest that 17th-century philosopher Baruch Spinoza has an interesting and startlingly contemporary answer to this question.

3.40pm

Kenneth Baxter (Archive Services)

Dundee's Doctor Daughters: Early Female Medical Students at University College Dundee

Making use of the University Records and Medical Collections in the Archives, this talk will explore the experiences and remarkable achivements of some of Dundee's early female graduates including Margaret Fairlie and the wider impact they made upon the city and the wider world in a range of ways.

3.55pm  Refreshments

4.10pm

Mary Modeen (Fine Art, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design)

Seeing the Unseen, Hearing the Unheard: Attending to the World, Reflectively

As sentient humans, how we take in the world can make the difference between a healthy attention, a rich curiosity, or a baffling ‘muddling through’ the surroundings in our everyday life. Art has the potential to point to the unseen, and interdisciplinary study offers a rich and complex foundation for uncovering the spectral traces of the invisible in the present.

4.25pm

Billy Kenefick & Derek Patrick (History, School of Humanities)

“Fine Physique and Admirable Bearing”: Image and reality and the Scottish Soldier  

From Waterloo to the Second Boer War the Scottish soldier was praised for his military and physical prowess and throughout portrayed as a stoic defender of Empire. But does this image match up to reality, and is it a fair reflection of the physical health and well-being of the nation as a whole?   

4.40pm

Edward Hall (Geography, School of the Environment)

Making and gifting belonging: creative arts and people with learning disabilities

This talk will argue that the making of arts objects and performances provides opportunities for expression and belonging for people with learning disabilities; that ‘gifting’ these to a wider society can create connection and recognition; and that the safe spaces where art is made can generate senses of belonging.

4.55pm   Finish

Don’t miss the current exhibition in the Lamb Gallery – Human Race: Inside the History of Sports Medicine, funded by the Legacy Trust as an official part of the Cultural Olympiad.

At 6pm in D’Arcy Thompson Lecture Theatre (ground floor, Tower), Vicky Strange will be giving a free public lecture about her work as General Manager, Sports Competition for the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow 2014. All welcome.

 

 

 


Previous Culture Days

 


 

Click here to see the programmes from previous culture days.

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