Dundee Literary Festival 2013 - Thursday 24th October

24
Oct

Theatre Studies Workshop

9am

theatre

If you’ve ever thought about working for the theatre, this free workshop will take you on a whirlwind tour of the jobs involved - try your hand at directing, stage design, playwriting. We’ll have experts from the University of Dundee on hand to help develop your skills. This event is supported by the brand new degree in Theatre Studies at the University of Dundee - bringing students, actors and theatre professionals together in a rich creative mix. For more information about the degree, go to www.dundee.ac.uk

24
Oct

Mary Lily Walker - Forgotten Visionary of Dundee

Eddie Small

10am

 

Come and find out about Dundee’s best-kept secret. Eddie Small’s recently published book about Mary Lily sold out within days (don’t worry – the publishers have reprinted!) and Eddie will talk about her life and times, and explain her disappearance from the consciousness of the public of her home city.

Dr Suzanne Zeedyk, who led the ‘Mary Lily Walker Project’, will be in conversation with the author about the research and the writing of this book about a remarkable lady who did so much for the women and children of Dundee.

24
Oct

Writing Family Histories Workshop

Eddie Small

11am

 

Researching your family history, or anybody else’s for that matter, is a fascinating and ever more popular pursuit. Many archives, including the excellent one at the University of Dundee, have opened welcoming arms to the public to encourage genealogy hunters.

But how do you convert this research into a piece of writing? Eddie Small will conduct this workshop which will explain how to make the most of your research material. And if you have some material to bring along on the day, so much the better.

24
Oct

Robert Alan Jamieson

Talking Poetry

12noon

 

Robert Alan Jamieson was born in 1958 in the crofting community of Sandness on Shetland. After publishing two novels (Soor Hearts and Thin Wealth) and a collection of poetry, Shoormal, during the 1980s, he studied English Literature at the University of Edinburgh as a mature student, before taking up the William Soutar Fellowship in Perth (1993-96). He currently teaches on the Creative Writing course at Edinburgh University.

His most recent publications are the poetry collection, Nort Atlantik Drift (Luath, 2007) and Da Happie Laand, his epic ‘strange masterpiece’ from 2011. Here he talks to Dundee’s own Kirsty Gunn about his work with words.

24
Oct

A Poem and a Piece

Michael Hulse

1pm

 

Michael Hulse has won numerous awards for his poetry, and has earned the praise of Simon Armitage, C. K. Stead, the late Peter Porter and many others. His books of poetry include Knowing and Forgetting (1981), Propaganda (1985), Empires and Holy Lands (2002) and, most recently, The Secret History (2009). A new collection, Half-Life, is forthcoming. His best-selling anthology The Twentieth Century in Poetry (co-edited with Simon Rae, 2011) was described by The Guardian as 'magnificent'. He has translated more than sixty books from the German, among them works by Goethe, Rilke, W. G. Sebald and Herta Müller

24
Oct

Blossom: A Journey Beyond Independence

Lesley Riddoch

2pm

 

Covering topics including housing, health, language and culture, acclaimed journalist and broadcaster Lesley Riddoch looks at the way in which Scots identify themselves and how this needs to change in order for the country to 'Blossom' - as an independent nation or a strongly devolved one. Arguing that limited access to security and wealth has left Scots feeling like outsiders in their own country, this book tackles fundamental and personal issues of identity that matter to ordinary Scots.

Designed to incite discussion and debate, this book will appeal to those who believe larger issues of self esteem and power lurk beneath the complexities of the independence debate and want to delve deeper.

24
Oct

Sarah Hall & Ruth Thomas

The Long and the Short of It

3pm

 

Join us for an afternoon with two writers equally adept at novels and short stories. Acclaimed novelist Sarah Hall’s latest book - her first collection of short stories - The Beautiful Indifference, takes us from the heathered fells and lowlands of Cumbria to an eerily still lake in the Finnish wilderness and places in between in seven uniquely disturbing and deeply erotic stories.

Award-winning short story stylist Ruth Thomas’s second novel The Home Corner is a funny, tender exploration of feeling adrift when facing the ‘real world’ for the first time, the way we create our own identities in the light of other people’s, and queries the distinctions that are made between the absent and the present, the real and the imagined.

24
Oct

Michael Hulse

Found in Translation

4pm

 

'A poet, I believe, is always stronger for having a genuine love of language, literatures, the visual arts, music, history, the natural world, and a wish to pursue substance rather than surface effect, and these requirements fire my own writing.' Michael Hulse is a translator, teacher, editor, magazine publisher and critic, as well as a poet. He has translated titans of German literature - including Goethe, Rilke, Jakob Wassermann, Elfriede Jelinek, W. G. Sebald and Herta Müller – and championed the work of others through his editorship of literary magazines, such as Stand and The Warwick Review. In his event he will share his love of language and thoughts on the landscape of literature with Kirsty Gunn.

24
Oct

James Adair

Rowing Across the Indian Ocean

5pm

 

‘Always do sober what you said you’d do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut’ - Ernest Hemingway

Over a boozy Sunday lunch, flatmates James Adair and Ben Stenning made a promise to row across an ocean. At first they considered the Pacific, then the Atlantic, but once James Cracknell and Ben Fogle completed the high-profile Atlantic Rowing Race, their thoughts turned to the Indian Ocean, longer and tougher than the Atlantic and having seen fewer people row across its waters than have walked on the Moon. Join James as he gives a fascinating illustrated talk based on their record-breaking journey.

24
Oct

Kari Herbert

Polar Exploration

7pm

 

Kari Herbert’s book Heart of the Hero tells the fascinating untold stories of the remarkable women who married polar explorers, acting not only as their inspiration but also as their travel companions, administrators, publicists, fundraisers and more. The book was launched right here in Dundee on board the Discovery.

The polar explorers of the Victorian and Edwardian eras were superstars in their day. Exploration was a male domain, and most women encountered the wilder parts of the world only second-hand. For those intrepid few who joined the men on these extreme frontiers, life was every bit as dangerous, gruelling and thrilling – yet their stories had gone untold.

Kari Herbert blends accounts of longing, betrayal and hope with moments of breathtaking peril all the while drawing on her own experience of life in a polar family (her father, pioneering explorer Sir Wally Herbert, took Kari and her mother to live in Greenland when she was 10 months old...). Join Kari for an unforgettable, illustrated talk and Q&A.